Favour vs Favor what difference

what is difference between Favour and Favor

English

Pronunciation

  • (UK) IPA(key): /ˈfeɪ.və/
  • (US) IPA(key): /ˈfeɪ.vɚ/
  • Rhymes: -eɪvə(ɹ)
  • Hyphenation: fa‧vour

Noun

favour (countable and uncountable, plural favours)

  1. (British spelling) Standard spelling of favor.

Derived terms

  • out of favour

Translations

Verb

favour (third-person singular simple present favours, present participle favouring, simple past and past participle favoured)

  1. (British spelling) Standard spelling of favor.
    • 1611, KJV, Luke 1:28:
      “And the angel came in unto her, and said, Hail, thou that art highly favoured, the Lord is with thee: blessed art thou among women.” —

Usage notes

  • Favour is the standard British and Commonwealth spelling. Favor is the standard American spelling, and an alternative in Canada.

Translations


Old French

Noun

favour f (oblique plural favours, nominative singular favour, nominative plural favours)

  1. Late Anglo-Norman spelling of favor


English

Alternative forms

  • favour (Commonwealth, Ireland)

Etymology

From Middle English favour, favor, faver, from Anglo-Norman favour, from mainland Old French favor, from Latin favor (good will; kindness; partiality), from faveō (to be kind to). Respelled in American English to more closely match its Latin etymon. Compare also Danish favør (favor), Irish fabhar (favor), from the same Romance source.

Pronunciation

  • (US) IPA(key): /ˈfeɪvɚ/
  • (UK) IPA(key): /ˈfeɪvə/
  • Rhymes: -eɪvə(ɹ)
  • Hyphenation: fa‧vor

Noun

favor (countable and uncountable, plural favors) (American spelling, alternative in Canada)

  1. A kind or helpful deed; an instance of voluntarily assisting (someone).
  2. Goodwill; benevolent regard.
  3. A small gift; a party favor.
    A marriage favour is a bunch or knot of white ribbons or white flowers worn at a wedding.
    • ca. 1599, William Shakespeare, Henry V, Act IV, sc. 7:
      Here, Fluellen; wear thou this favour for me and
      stick it in thy cap: when Alencon and myself were
      down together, I plucked this glove from his helm []
    • 1848, William Makepeace Thackery, Vanity Fair, Chapter 22:
      The rain drove into the bride and bridegroom’s faces as they passed to the chariot. The postilions’ favours draggled on their dripping jackets.
  4. Mildness or mitigation of punishment; lenity.
    • I could not discover the lenity and favour of this sentence.
  5. The object of regard; person or thing favoured.
  6. (obsolete) Appearance; look; countenance; face.
  7. (law) Partiality; bias.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Bouvier to this entry?)
  8. (archaic) A letter, a written communication.
    • 1748, Samuel Richardson, Clarissa, Letter 68:
      I will now take some notice of your last favour; but being so far behind-hand with you, must be brief.
  9. (obsolete) Anything worn publicly as a pledge of a woman’s favor.
  10. (obsolete, in the plural) Lovelocks.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Wright to this entry?)

Usage notes

  • Favor is the standard US spelling, and an alternative in Canada. Favour is the standard spelling in Canada and outside North America.
  • English speakers usually “do someone a favor” (rather than *”make them a favor”, which would be sense 3 only). See Appendix:Collocations of do, have, make, and take for uses and meaning of favor collocated with these words.

Antonyms

  • disfavor
  • discriminate
  • discrimination
  • harm
  • sabotage
  • unfavor

Synonyms

  • aid
  • help
  • lend a hand
  • token

Derived terms

Translations

Verb

favor (third-person singular simple present favors, present participle favoring, simple past and past participle favored) (US, alternative in Canada, transitive)

  1. To look upon fondly; to prefer.
    • 1611, Luke 1:28, King James version
      And the angel came in unto her, and said, Hail, thou that art highly favored, the Lord is with thee: blessed art thou among women.
    • 2007, Bert Casper, Shadow Upon the Dream: Book 1: Barrûn, page 537:
      [] alone, without having to favor his right, uninjured leg, []
  2. To encourage, conduce to
  3. To do a favor [noun sense 1] for; to show beneficence toward.
  4. To treat with care.
  5. (in dialects, including Southern US and Louisiana) To resemble, to look like (another person).
    • 1970, Donald Harington, Lightning Bug:
      ‘Mandy?’ he said, and stared at the girl. ‘Don’t favor her too much.’ ‘Favors her dad,’ Latha said, and looked at him.

Synonyms

  • abet
  • assist
  • endorse
  • sanction

Antonyms

  • disfavor
  • discriminate

Derived terms

Translations


Catalan

Etymology

From Latin favor, attested from the 14th century.

Pronunciation

Noun

favor m or f (plural favors)

  1. favour

Derived terms

  • a favor de
  • afavorir
  • en favor de
  • per favor

References

Further reading

  • “favor” in Diccionari de la llengua catalana, segona edició, Institut d’Estudis Catalans.
  • “favor” in Diccionari normatiu valencià, Acadèmia Valenciana de la Llengua.
  • “favor” in Diccionari català-valencià-balear, Antoni Maria Alcover and Francesc de Borja Moll, 1962.

Kabuverdianu

Etymology

From Portuguese favor.

Noun

favor

  1. favour
  2. pleasure

Latin

Etymology

From faveō (I am well disposed or inclined toward, favor, countenance, befriend).

Pronunciation

  • (Classical) IPA(key): /ˈfa.u̯or/, [ˈfäu̯ɔr]
  • (Ecclesiastical) IPA(key): /ˈfa.vor/, [ˈfɑːvɔr]

Noun

favor m (genitive favōris); third declension

  1. good will, inclination, partiality, favor
  2. support

Declension

Third-declension noun.

Descendants

References

  • favor in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • favor in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • favor in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition, 1883–1887)
  • favor in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré Latin-Français, Hachette
  • Carl Meissner; Henry William Auden (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[3], London: Macmillan and Co.
  • favor in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.

Norn

Alternative forms

  • fa vor (rare)

Etymology

From Old Norse faðir (father) + vár (our), from Proto-Germanic *fadēr + *unseraz, from Proto-Indo-European *ph₂tḗr. Compare Shetlandic fy vor.

Noun

favor

  1. (Orkney) our father

Occitan

Etymology

From Latin favor.

Noun

favor f (plural favors)

  1. favor

Derived terms

  • favorable
  • favorir
  • favorisar
  • favorit
  • favoritisme
  • favorablament
  • afavorir
  • en favor de
  • a favor de
  • per favor
  • faire una favor
  • dar les favors

Antonyms

  • desfavor

Portuguese

Etymology

From Latin favor (favour; good will), from faveō (I favour), from Proto-Indo-European *gʰoweh₁ (to notice).

Pronunciation

  • (Portugal) IPA(key): /fɐ.ˈvoɾ/
  • (Brazil) IPA(key): /fa.ˈvoʁ/, [fɐ.ˈvoχ]
  • Hyphenation: fa‧vor

Noun

favor m (plural favores)

  1. favour (instance of voluntarily assisting someone)
  2. favour; goodwill (benevolent regard)
    Synonyms: (obsolete) favorança, graça, mercê

Derived terms

  • a favor de
  • em favor de
  • fazer o favor de
  • por favor

Related terms

Adverb

favor (not comparable)

  1. (before a verb in the infinitive) please (seen on warnings and the like)

Romanian

Noun

favor n (plural favoruri)

  1. Alternative form of favoare

Declension


Spanish

Etymology

From Latin favor (genitive singular favōris).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /faˈboɾ/, [faˈβ̞oɾ]
  • Hyphenation: fa‧vor

Noun

favor m (plural favores)

  1. favor/favour

Derived terms

Related terms

  • favorable
  • favorecer
  • favoritismo
  • favorito

Venetian

Etymology

Compare Italian favore

Noun

favor m (plural favuri)

  1. favour

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