fawn vs kowtow what difference

what is difference between fawn and kowtow

English

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /fɔːn/
  • Rhymes: -ɔːn
  • Homophone: faun

Etymology 1

From Middle English foun, fawne, from Old French faon, from Vulgar Latin *fetonem, from Latin fētus (offspring, young), from Proto-Indo-European *dʰeh₁(y)- (to suckle, nurse)

Noun

fawn (plural fawns)

  1. A young deer.
  2. A pale brown colour tinted with yellow, like that of a fawn.
  3. (obsolete) The young of an animal; a whelp.
    • she [the tigress] rageth upon the shore and the sands, for the losse of her fawnes
Derived terms
  • in fawn
Translations

Adjective

fawn (not comparable)

  1. Of the fawn colour.
Derived terms
  • fawn lily
Translations

Verb

fawn (third-person singular simple present fawns, present participle fawning, simple past and past participle fawned)

  1. (intransitive) To give birth to a fawn.

Etymology 2

From Middle English fawnen, from Old English fahnian, fagnian, fæġnian (to rejoice, make glad). Akin to Old Norse fagna (to rejoice). See also fain.

Verb

fawn (third-person singular simple present fawns, present participle fawning, simple past and past participle fawned)

  1. (intransitive) To exhibit affection or attempt to please.
  2. (intransitive) To seek favour by flattery and obsequious behaviour (with on or upon).
    Synonyms: grovel, wheedle, soft-soap, toady
  3. (intransitive, of a dog) To show devotion or submissiveness by wagging its tail, nuzzling, licking, etc.
Derived terms
  • fawn over
  • overfawn
Translations

Noun

fawn (plural fawns)

  1. (rare) A servile cringe or bow.
  2. Base flattery.

See also

  • Appendix:Colors

References


Middle English

Alternative forms

  • faun, faawn

Etymology

Borrowed from Latin Faunus.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /fau̯n/

Noun

fawn (plural fawnes or fawny)

  1. faun, satyr

Descendants

  • English: faun

References

  • “faun, n.”, in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007.

Welsh

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /vau̯n/

Verb

fawn

  1. Soft mutation of bawn.

Mutation


English


Alternative forms

  • kotoo (obsolete)
  • kotow

Etymology

From Sinitic 叩頭叩头 (Cantonese kau3 tau4, Mandarin kòutóu), literally “knock head”.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈkaʊˌtaʊ/
  • Rhymes: -aʊ

Verb

kowtow (third-person singular simple present kowtows, present participle kowtowing, simple past and past participle kowtowed)

  1. (intransitive, figuratively) To grovel, act in a very submissive manner.
    • 2015, Oleg V. Khlevniuk, Stalin: New Biography of a Dictator, Yale University Press (→ISBN), page 265
      The letter to Razin contained another thought that preoccupied Stalin in the first months after the war: the need to avoid “kowtowing to the West,” including showing “unwarranted respect” for the “military authorities of Germany.”
  2. (intransitive, historical) To kneel and bow low enough to touch one’s forehead to the ground.
    • 2013, Wendy Swartz, Robert Ford Campany, Yang Lu, Jessey J. C. Choo, Early Medieval China: A Sourcebook, Columbia University Press (→ISBN), page 645
      When the weather turned cold, the tears that he shed would become frozen like veins; the blood on his forehead from kowtowing would also freeze and would not drip.
  3. (intransitive) To bow very deeply.
    (Can we add an example for this sense?)

Derived terms

  • kowtower
  • kowtowing

Translations

Noun

kowtow (plural kowtows)

  1. The act of kowtowing.
    • 1990, Hugh D. R. Baker, Hong Kong Images: People and Animals, Hong Kong University Press (→ISBN), page 93
      Three elders dressed in their long silk ceremonial gowns perform the kowtow before the altar in their clan ancestral hall.

Translations

See also

  • prostrate

Portuguese

Noun

kowtow m (plural kowtows)

  1. kowtow (bow low enough to touch one’s forehead to the ground)

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