fawn vs truckle what difference

what is difference between fawn and truckle

English

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /fɔːn/
  • Rhymes: -ɔːn
  • Homophone: faun

Etymology 1

From Middle English foun, fawne, from Old French faon, from Vulgar Latin *fetonem, from Latin fētus (offspring, young), from Proto-Indo-European *dʰeh₁(y)- (to suckle, nurse)

Noun

fawn (plural fawns)

  1. A young deer.
  2. A pale brown colour tinted with yellow, like that of a fawn.
  3. (obsolete) The young of an animal; a whelp.
    • she [the tigress] rageth upon the shore and the sands, for the losse of her fawnes
Derived terms
  • in fawn
Translations

Adjective

fawn (not comparable)

  1. Of the fawn colour.
Derived terms
  • fawn lily
Translations

Verb

fawn (third-person singular simple present fawns, present participle fawning, simple past and past participle fawned)

  1. (intransitive) To give birth to a fawn.

Etymology 2

From Middle English fawnen, from Old English fahnian, fagnian, fæġnian (to rejoice, make glad). Akin to Old Norse fagna (to rejoice). See also fain.

Verb

fawn (third-person singular simple present fawns, present participle fawning, simple past and past participle fawned)

  1. (intransitive) To exhibit affection or attempt to please.
  2. (intransitive) To seek favour by flattery and obsequious behaviour (with on or upon).
    Synonyms: grovel, wheedle, soft-soap, toady
  3. (intransitive, of a dog) To show devotion or submissiveness by wagging its tail, nuzzling, licking, etc.
Derived terms
  • fawn over
  • overfawn
Translations

Noun

fawn (plural fawns)

  1. (rare) A servile cringe or bow.
  2. Base flattery.

See also

  • Appendix:Colors

References


Middle English

Alternative forms

  • faun, faawn

Etymology

Borrowed from Latin Faunus.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /fau̯n/

Noun

fawn (plural fawnes or fawny)

  1. faun, satyr

Descendants

  • English: faun

References

  • “faun, n.”, in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007.

Welsh

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /vau̯n/

Verb

fawn

  1. Soft mutation of bawn.

Mutation


English

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈtɹʌkəl/
  • Rhymes: -ʌkəl

Etymology 1

From Middle English trokel, trocle, trookyl, from Anglo-Norman trocle, from Medieval Latin trochlea (a block, sheaf containing one or more pulleys); or from a diminutive of truck (wheel), formed with -le, equivalent to truck +‎ -le.

Noun

truckle (plural truckles)

  1. A small wheel; a caster or pulley.
  2. A small wheel of cheese.
  3. A truckle bed.
Alternative forms
  • troccle (obsolete)
Derived terms
  • truckle bed

Verb

truckle (third-person singular simple present truckles, present participle truckling, simple past and past participle truckled)

  1. To roll or move upon truckles, or casters; to trundle.
  2. (intransitive) To sleep in a truckle bed.

Etymology 2

From a back formation of truckle bed (a bed on which a pupil slept, because it was rolled on casters into a lower position under the master’s larger bed), from Middle English trookylbed. Compare also trundle bed. Assisted by false association with Middle English *trukelen, truken, trokien, trukien, from Old English trucian (to fail, diminish), Low German truggeln (to flatter, fawn), see truck.(Can this(+) etymology be sourced?)

Verb

truckle (third-person singular simple present truckles, present participle truckling, simple past and past participle truckled)

  1. (intransitive) To act in a submissive manner; to fawn, submit to a superior.
    • 1687, John Norris, A Collection of Miscellanies, consisting of Poems, Essays, Discourses and Letters
      Religion it self is forced to truckle to worldly policy.
Derived terms
  • truckler
Translations

References

  • Webster’s Seventh New Collegiate Dictionary, Springfield, Massachusetts, G.&C. Merriam Co., 1967

Yola

Etymology

From Middle English trokel.

Noun

truckle

  1. a car

References

  • Jacob Poole (1867), William Barnes, editor, A Glossary, With some Pieces of Verse, of the old Dialect of the English Colony in the Baronies of Forth and Bargy, County of Wexford, Ireland, London: J. Russell Smith

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