feast vs fete what difference

what is difference between feast and fete

English

Pronunciation

  • enPR: fēst, IPA(key): /fiːst/
  • Rhymes: -iːst

Etymology 1

From Middle English feeste, feste, borrowed from Old French feste, from Late Latin festa, from the plural of Latin festum (holiday, festival, feast), ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *dʰéh₁s (god, godhead, deity); see also Ancient Greek θεός (theós, god, goddess). More at theo-. Doublet of fete and fiesta.

Noun

feast (plural feasts)

  1. A very large meal, often of a ceremonial nature.
  2. Something delightful
  3. A festival; a holy day or holiday; a solemn, or more commonly, a joyous, anniversary.
    • The seventh day shall be a feast to the Lord.
    • Now his parents went to Jerusalem every year at the feast of the passover.
Synonyms
  • banquet
Derived terms
  • afterfeast
  • feast-day
  • feast for the eyes
  • feastful
  • feastly
  • Feast of Asses
  • Feast of Fools
  • forefeast
  • Great Feasts
  • love feast
  • postfeast
Translations

Etymology 2

From Middle English feesten, festen, from Old French fester, from Medieval Latin festāre, from the noun. See above.

Verb

feast (third-person singular simple present feasts, present participle feasting, simple past and past participle feasted)

  1. (intransitive) To partake in a feast, or large meal.
  2. (intransitive) To dwell upon (something) with delight.
  3. (transitive) To hold a feast in honor of (someone).
    • 1599, William Shakespeare, Henry V, Act IV scene iii:
      He that shall see this day, and live old age,
      Will yearly on the vigil feast his neighbors
      And say “Tomorrow is Saint Crispian.”
  4. (transitive, obsolete) To serve as a feast for; to feed sumptuously.
    • 1597-1598, Joseph Hall, Virgidemiarum
      Or once a week, perhaps, for novelty / Reez’d bacon-soords shall feast his family.
Derived terms
  • feaster
  • feast one’s eyes
Translations

Anagrams

  • Fates, Festa, TAFEs, fates, feats, festa, fetas


English

Alternative forms

  • fête

Etymology

Borrowed from French fête. Doublet of feast and fiesta.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /feɪt/, /fɛt/
  • AHD: /fāt/, /fet/
  • Homophones: fate
  • Rhymes: -eɪt, -ɛt

Noun

fete (plural fetes)

  1. A festival open to the public, the proceeds from which are often given to charity.
    • 1991, Treasure Hunting, Treasure Hunting Publications:
      The final fete of the year was held at the Plymouth Hoe on 20 July, where fine weather and crowds of people ensured much support for local charities and boosted club finds.
  2. A feast, celebration or carnival.

Translations

Verb

fete (third-person singular simple present fetes, present participle feting, simple past and past participle feted)

  1. (transitive, usually in the passive) To celebrate (a person).
    Synonym: celebrate
    • 1992, Today, News Group Newspapers Ltd:
      Danielle Salamon was also four when she was feted as a musical genius in 1953.

Translations

Anagrams

  • ETFE, feet, teef

Latin

Adjective

fēte

  1. vocative masculine singular of fētus

Neapolitan

Etymology

From Latin fēteō

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /fɛtə/

Verb

fete

  1. to smell bad, to stink

Norwegian Bokmål

Adjective

fete

  1. definite singular of fet
  2. plural of fet

Romanian

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ˈfe.te]

Noun

fete f pl

  1. plural of fată

Swedish

Adjective

fete

  1. absolute definite natural masculine singular of fet.

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