feather vs square what difference

what is difference between feather and square

English

Alternative forms

  • fether (archaic)

Etymology

From Middle English feþer, from Old English feþer, from Proto-West Germanic *feþru, from Proto-Germanic *feþrō (compare West Frisian fear, German Low German Fedder, Dutch veder, veer, German Feder, Yiddish פֿעדער(feder), Danish fjer, Swedish fjäder, Norwegian Bokmål fjær, fjør, Norwegian Nynorsk fjør), from Proto-Indo-European *péth₂r̥ (feather, wing), from *peth₂- (to fly). Cognate with Ancient Greek πέτομαι (pétomai), Albanian shpend (bird), Latin penna, Old Armenian թիռ (tʿiṙ).

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /ˈfɛð.ə(ɹ)/
  • (General American) IPA(key): /ˈfɛð.ɚ/
  • Rhymes: -ɛðə(r)
  • Hyphenation: feath‧er

Noun

feather (plural feathers)

  1. A branching, hair-like structure that grows on the bodies of birds, used for flight, swimming, protection and display.
    • 1873, W. K. Brooks, “A Feather”, Popular Science Monthly, volume IV, page 687
      Notice, too, that the shaft is not straight, but bent so that the upper surface of the feather is convex, and the lower concave.
  2. Long hair on the lower legs of a dog or horse, especially a draft horse, notably the Clydesdale breed. Narrowly only the rear hair.
    Synonyms: feathers, feathering, horsefeathers
    Antonym: spats
  3. One of the fins or wings on the shaft of an arrow.
  4. A longitudinal strip projecting from an object to strengthen it, or to enter a channel in another object and thereby prevent displacement sideways but permit motion lengthwise; a spline.
  5. Kind; nature; species (from the proverbial phrase “birds of a feather”).
  6. One of the two shims of the three-piece stone-splitting tool known as plug and feather or plug and feathers; the feathers are placed in a borehole and then a wedge is driven between them, causing the stone to split.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Knight to this entry?)
  7. The angular adjustment of an oar or paddle-wheel float, with reference to a horizontal axis, as it leaves or enters the water.
  8. Anything petty or trifling; a whit or jot.
    • 1823, An Ecclesiastical Memoir of Essex Street Religious Society
      To some pew purchasers he gave deeds, to others he gave, none, but both were promised security, and both it seems were equally secure, for the pew deed as Mr. Melledge declared to Mr. G. was not worth a feather.
  9. (hunting, in the plural) Partridges and pheasants, as opposed to rabbits and hares (called fur).
  10. (rail transport) A junction indicator attached to a colour-light signal at an angle, which lights up, typically with four white lights in a row, when a diverging route is set up.

Synonyms

  • plume (archaic, literary and poetic), pluma (archaic)

Derived terms

Translations

Verb

feather (third-person singular simple present feathers, present participle feathering, simple past and past participle feathered)

  1. To cover or furnish with feathers; (when of an arrow) to fletch.
    • 1912, Frances, Object-lessons on Temperance, Or, The Indian Maiden and Her White Deer, page 117:
      Olondaw had taught Hazeleye how to use her bow and arrows, and that each might know the result of his or her own shooting, he had feathered her arrow with white and his own with red. How strange are the events of this life, []
    • 2007, Thomas Perry, Vanishing Act, Ballantine Books (→ISBN), page 302:
      She feathered her arrows in the Seneca fashion, two lengths of feather tied on with a spiral twist, so they would spin in flight. The trick was to glue both sides in place with a little sticky pine sap so they would stay put while she tied them []
  2. To adorn, as if with feathers; to fringe.
  3. To arrange in the manner or appearance of feathers.
  4. (transitive, intransitive, rowing) To rotate the oars while they are out of the water to reduce wind resistance.
  5. (aeronautics) To streamline the blades of an aircraft’s propeller by rotating them perpendicular to the axis of the propeller when the engine is shut down so that the propeller does not windmill during flight.
  6. (carpentry, engineering) To finely shave or bevel an edge.
  7. (computer graphics) To intergrade or blend the pixels of an image with those of a background or neighboring image.
  8. To render light as a feather; to give wings to.
    • c. 1650, Robert Loveday, letter to Mr. C.
      The Polonian story, which perhaps may feather some tedious hours.
  9. To enrich; to exalt; to benefit.
    • They stuck not to say that the king cared not to plume his nobility and people to feather himself.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Dryden to this entry?)
  10. To tread, as a cock.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Dryden to this entry?)
  11. (snooker, billiards) To move the cue back and forth along the bridge in preparation for striking the cue ball.
  12. (snooker, billiards) To accidentally touch the cue ball with the tip of the cue when taking aim.
  13. To touch lightly, like (or as if with) a feather.
    • 2001, Joan Hohl, Maybe Tomorrow, Zebra Books (→ISBN), page 186:
      His breath feathered her lips; her spine, her legs weakened, went soft at the wafting warmth.
    • 2006, Gary Parker, Her Daddy’s Eyes, Baker Books (→ISBN), page 143:
      A soft breeze feathered her face and hair. The smell of honeysuckle blanketed the air. She concentrated on shutting out every sound except the whisper of her heart. Gradually the inner distractions became fewer.
  14. To move softly, like a feather.
    • 2005, Radclyffe, Justice Served, Bold Strokes Books Inc (→ISBN):
      She feathered her fingers through Mitchell’s hair. “Besides, I like you a whole lot better than Frye.”
    • 2011, L.L. Raand, Blood Hunt, Bold Strokes Books Inc (→ISBN):
      “Asking me not to breathe would be simpler,” Drake said. “If I could spare you what’s coming—” “No.” Drake feathered her fingers through Sylvan’s hair. “We fight together.” Sylvan nodded and relaxed in her embrace. Drake didn’t fear death.

Derived terms

  • feathered
  • feather one’s nest
  • feather one’s own nest
  • tar and feather

Translations

Further reading

  • feather on Wikipedia.Wikipedia

References

  • Horse Glossary
  • Horses Glossary
  • Cowboy Dictionary – Cowboy F: Feather

Anagrams

  • feareth, terefah


English

Etymology

From Middle English square, sqware, squyre; from Old French esquarre, esquerre, (modern French équerre), from Vulgar Latin *exquadra, from Latin ex- +‎ quadro, from quadrus.

Pronunciation

  • (UK) IPA(key): /skwɛə(ɹ)/, /skwɛː(ɹ)/, enPR: skwâr
  • (US) IPA(key): /skwɛɚ/, enPR: skwâr
  • Rhymes: -ɛə(ɹ)

Noun

square (plural squares)

  1. (geometry) A polygon with four sides of equal length and four right angles; an equilateral rectangle; a regular quadrilateral.
    • 1927, Kazimir Malevich, The Non-Objective World
      I took refuge in the square form and exhibited a picture which consisted of nothing more than a black square on a white field.
  2. Something characterized by a square, or nearly square, form.
    1. A cell in a grid.
    2. A square piece, part, or surface, such as a square of glass.
    3. The front of a woman’s dress over the bosom, usually worked or embroidered.
    4. (Canada, US) A dessert cut into rectangular pieces, or a piece of such a dessert.
    5. (printing) A certain number of lines, forming a portion of a column, nearly square; used chiefly in reckoning the prices of advertisements in newspapers.
  3. An L- or T-shaped tool used to place objects or draw lines at right angles.
    Synonyms: steel square, framing square, carpenter’s square
    1. (figuratively, obsolete) A true measure, standard, or pattern.
  4. An open space or park, often in the center of a town, not necessarily square in shape, often containing trees, seating and other features pleasing to the eye.
    • The statue of Alexander the Seventh stands in the large square of the town.
    • 1995 October 10, NewsRadio, season 2 episode 3:
      You’re not in Wisconsin, Dave. The big story isn’t about a cow wandering into the town square.
    Synonyms: piazza, plaza
    1. (often in street names or addresses) A street surrounding a public square or plaza.
      Synonym: place
  5. (mathematics) The product of a number or quantity multiplied by itself; the second power of a number, value, term or expression.
  6. (military) A body of troops drawn up in a square formation.
    • 1818, quoted in Christopher Kelly, History of the French Revolution and of the Wars produced by that Memorable Event
      The French cavalry, in proof armour, repeatedly charged our squares, their cannon opening chasms; but the British infantry, though greatly diminished, were inflexible and impenetrable to the last.
    • 1897, Henry Newbolt, Vitae Lampada
      The sand of the desert is sodden red,— / Red with the wreck of a square that broke;— / The Gatling’s jammed and the Colonel dead, / And the regiment blind with dust and smoke.
    • 1990, Peter Hopkirk, The Great Game, Folio Society 2010, page 144:
      After disastrous attempts to break the Russian squares, during which, Longworth recounts, ‘the best and the bravest of the warriors fell victim to their own rashness’, the Circassians likewise changed their tactics.
  7. (1950s slang) A socially conventional or conservative person; a person who has little or no interest in the latest fads or trends: still sometimes used in modern terminology.
    Synonyms: see Thesaurus:mainstreamer
  8. (Britain) The symbol # on a telephone; hash.
    Synonyms: hash, sharp, (US) pound sign
  9. (cricket) The central area of a cricket field, with one or more pitches of which only one is used at a time.
  10. (real estate) A unit of measurement of area, equal to a 10 foot by 10 foot square, i.e. 100 square feet or roughly 9.3 square metres. Used in real estate for the size of a house or its rooms, though progressively being replaced by square metres in metric countries such as Australia.
    • 2006, Macquarie Bank (Australia), press release Macquarie releases Real Estate Market Outlook 2006 – “The World Squared”, 21 June 2006 [2]
      Just as the basic unit of real estate measurement across the world is the square
    • 2007, Your Estate advertisement for Grindelwald Tasmania [3]
      The house is very large and open and boasts 39 squares of living space plus over 13 squares of decking area on 3 sides and 17 squares of garage and workshop downstairs.
  11. (roofing) A unit used in measuring roof area equivalent to 100 square feet (9.29 m2) of roof area.
  12. (academia) A mortarboard
  13. (colloquial, US) A square meal.
  14. (archaic) Exact proportion; justness of workmanship and conduct; regularity; rule.
    • 1594-1597, Richard Hooker, Of the Lawes of Ecclesiastical Politie
      They of Galatia [were] much more out of square.
  15. The relation of harmony, or exact agreement; equality; level.
    • We live not on the square with such as these.
  16. (astrology) The position of planets distant ninety degrees from each other; a quadrate.
  17. (dated) The act of squaring, or quarrelling; a quarrel.
  18. (slang) Cigarette.
  19. (brewing) A vat used for fermentation.

Derived terms

Translations

Descendants

  • Welsh: sgwâr

Adjective

square (comparative squarer, superlative squarest)

  1. Shaped like a square (the polygon).
  2. Forming a right angle.
    Synonyms: orthogonal, perpendicular, normal
    Antonym: crooked
    1. (nautical) Forming right angles with the mast or the keel, and parallel to the horizon; said of the yards of a square-rigged vessel when they are so braced.
  3. Used in the names of units of area formed by multiplying a unit of length by itself.
    Coordinate terms: cubic, linear
  4. Honest; straightforward.
    Synonyms: above board, on the level, on the square, on the up and up, straight
    • 1908, Perceval Landon, Thurnley Abbey
      I am not very good at analysing things, but I felt that she talked a little uncomfortably and with a suspicion of effort, smiled rather conventionally, and was obviously glad to go. These things seem trifling enough to repeat, but I had throughout the faint feeling that everything was not square.
  5. Fair.
  6. Even; tied
  7. (slang, derogatory) Socially conventional; boring.
    Synonym: bourgeois
  8. (cricket) In line with the batsman’s popping crease.
  9. Correctly aligned with respect to something else.
  10. Hearty; vigorous.
    • By Heaven, square eaters. More meat, I say.
  11. Having a shape broad for the height, with angular rather than curving outlines.

Derived terms

Translations

Verb

square (third-person singular simple present squares, present participle squaring, simple past and past participle squared)

  1. (transitive) To adjust so as to align with or place at a right angle to something else; in particular:
    1. (nautical) To place at a right angle to the mast or keel.
    2. (rowing) To rotate the oars so that they are perpendicular to the water.
  2. (transitive, intransitive) To resolve or reconcile; to suit or fit.
  3. To adjust or adapt so as to bring into harmony with something.
  4. (transitive, mathematics) Of a value, term, or expression, to multiply by itself; to raise to the second power.
  5. (transitive) To draw, with a pair of compasses and a straightedge only, a square with the same area as.
  6. (soccer) To make a short low pass sideways across the pitch
  7. (archaic) To take opposing sides; to quarrel.
  8. To accord or agree exactly; to be consistent with; to suit; to fit.
    • 1782, William Cowper, Charity
      No works shall find acceptance [] that square not truly with the Scripture plan.
  9. (obsolete) To go to opposite sides; to take an attitude of offense or defense, or of defiance; to quarrel.
  10. To take a boxing attitude; often with up or off.
  11. To form with four sides and four right angles.
  12. To form with right angles and straight lines, or flat surfaces.
    • 2002, William Boyd: Any Human Heart:
      Everything on his writing desk was squared off: blotter, paper knife, pen rack.
  13. To compare with, or reduce to, any given measure or standard.
  14. (astrology) To hold a quartile position respecting.
    • 1697, Thomas Creech, The five books of M. Manilius containing a system of the ancient astronomy and astrology, done into English verse
      the icy Goat, the Crab that square the Scales

Derived terms

Translations

See also

  • cubic
  • quadrilateral
  • rectangle
  • rhombus

Further reading

  • square on Wikipedia.Wikipedia

French

Etymology

Borrowed from English square. Doublet of équerre.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /skwaʁ/

Noun

square m (plural squares)

  1. small public garden in the middle of a square
    Le square de la tour Saint-Jacques.

Further reading

  • “square” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

Anagrams

  • arques, raques

Middle English

Alternative forms

  • sqware, squyre, squyer, sqyre, squar, sware

Etymology

From Old French esquarre, esquerre (modern French équerre), from Vulgar Latin *exquadra, from Latin ex- +‎ quadro, from quadrus.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈskwaːr(ə)/, /ˈskwɛːr(ə)/, /ˈskwiːr(ə)/

Noun

square (plural squares)

  1. A square (tool used to ensure a right angle)
  2. A square (equilateral rectangle); a square plot of land.
  3. One of the edges of a square.

Descendants

  • English: square
  • Scots: square

References

  • “squār(e, n.”, in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007, retrieved 2018-06-17.

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