feature vs have what difference

what is difference between feature and have

English

Etymology

From Middle English feture, from Anglo-Norman feture, from Old French faiture, from Latin factūra. Doublet of facture.

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /ˈfiːtʃə/
  • (General American) IPA(key): /ˈfitʃɚ/
  • Rhymes: -iːtʃə(ɹ)

Noun

feature (plural features)

  1. (obsolete) One’s structure or make-up: form, shape, bodily proportions.
    • 1596, Edmund Spenser, The Faerie Queene, IV.ii:
      all the powres of nature, / Which she by art could vse vnto her will, / And to her seruice bind each liuing creature; / Through secret vnderstanding of their feature.
  2. An important or main item.
  3. (media) A long, prominent article or item in the media, or the department that creates them; frequently used technically to distinguish content from news.
    1. (film) Ellipsis of feature film
  4. Any of the physical constituents of the face (eyes, nose, etc.).
  5. (computing) A beneficial capability of a piece of software.
  6. The cast or structure of anything, or of any part of a thing, as of a landscape, a picture, a treaty, or an essay; any marked peculiarity or characteristic.
  7. (archaeology) Something discerned from physical evidence that helps define, identify, characterize, and interpret an archeological site.
    • A feature of many Central Texas prehistoric archeological sites is a low spreading pile of stones called a rock midden. Other features at these sites may include small hearths.
  8. (engineering) Characteristic forms or shapes of parts. For example, a hole, boss, slot, cut, chamfer, or fillet.
  9. (statistics, machine learning) An individual measurable property or characteristic of a phenomenon being observed.
  10. (music) The act of being featured in a piece of music.
  11. (linguistics) The elements into which linguistic units can be broken down.
    Hyponyms: gender, number, person, tense

Synonyms

  • See also Thesaurus:characteristic

Derived terms

  • featural
  • feature article

Translations

Further reading

  • feature in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.

Verb

feature (third-person singular simple present features, present participle featuring, simple past and past participle featured)

  1. (transitive) To ascribe the greatest importance to something within a certain context.
  2. (transitive) To star, to contain.
  3. (intransitive) To appear, to make an appearance.
  4. (transitive, dated) To have features resembling.
    • Sunday. Reading for the Young (page 219)
      More than his talents, Roger grudged him his looks, the brown eyes, golden hair, and oval face, which made people say how Johnny Weir featured his mother.

Translations


Middle English

Noun

feature

  1. Alternative form of feture


English

Pronunciation

  • (stressed) IPA(key): /hæv/
  • (unstressed) IPA(key): /həv/, /əv/, /ə/
  • (have to): (UK, US) IPA(key): /hæf/, (UK) IPA(key): /hæv/
  • (obsolete, stressed) IPA(key): /heɪv/
  • Rhymes: -æv

Etymology 1

From Middle English haven, from Old English habban, hafian (to have), from Proto-Germanic *habjaną (to have), durative of *habjaną (to lift, take up), from Proto-Indo-European *kh₂pyéti, present tense of *keh₂p- (to take, seize, catch). Cognate with Saterland Frisian hääbe (to have), West Frisian hawwe (to have), Dutch hebben (to have), Afrikaans (to have), Low German hebben, hewwen (to have), German haben (to have), Danish have (to have), Swedish hava (to have), Norwegian Nynorsk ha (to have), Icelandic hafa (to have), Albanian kap (I grab, catch, grip), Latin capiō (take, verb), Russian хапать (xapatʹ, to seize). More at heave.

Since there is no common Indo-European root for a transitive possessive verb have (notice that Latin habeō is not etymologically related to English have), Proto-Indo-European probably lacked the have structure. Instead, the third person forms of be were used, with the possessor in dative case, compare Latin mihi est / sunt, literally to me is / are.

Alternative forms

  • haue (alternative typography, obsolete)
  • hae (Scottish-English)

Verb

have (third-person singular simple present has, present participle having, simple past and past participle had)

  1. (transitive) To possess, own.
  2. (transitive) To hold, as something at someone’s disposal.
    (not necessarily one’s own key)
  3. (transitive) To include as a part, ingredient, or feature.
  4. (transitive) Used to state the existence or presence of someone in a specified relationship with the subject.
  5. (transitive) To partake of (a particular substance, especially food or drink, or action or activity).
  6. (transitive) To be scheduled to attend, undertake or participate in.
  7. To experience, go through, undergo.
  8. To be afflicted with, suffer from.
  9. (auxiliary verb, taking a past participle) Used in forming the perfect aspect.
  10. Used as an interrogative verb before a pronoun to form a tag question, echoing a previous use of ‘have’ as an auxiliary verb or, in certain cases, main verb. (For further discussion, see the appendix English tag questions.)
  11. (auxiliary verb, taking a to-infinitive) See have to.
  12. (transitive) To give birth to.
  13. (usually passive) To obtain.
    The substance you describe can’t be had at any price.
  14. (transitive) To engage in sexual intercourse with.
  15. (transitive) To accept as a romantic partner.
  16. (transitive with bare infinitive) To cause to, by a command, request or invitation.
    • 2002, Matt Cyr, Something to Teach Me: Journal of an American in the Mountains of Haiti, Educa Vision, Inc., →ISBN, 25:
      His English is still in its beginning stages, like my Creole, but he was able to translate some Creole songs that he’s written into English—not the best English, but English nonetheless. He had me correct the translations. That kind of thing is very interesting to me. When I was learning Spanish, I would often take my favorite songs and try to translate them.
  17. (transitive with adjective or adjective-phrase complement) To cause to be.
  18. (transitive with bare infinitive) To be affected by an occurrence. (Used in supplying a topic that is not a verb argument.)
  19. (transitive with adjective or adjective-phrase complement) To depict as being.
  20. (Britain, slang) To defeat in a fight; take.
  21. (Britain, slang) To inflict punishment or retribution on.
  22. (dated outside Ireland) To be able to speak (a language).
  23. To feel or be (especially painfully) aware of.
  24. (informal, often passive) To trick, to deceive.
  25. (transitive, in the negative, often in continuous tenses) To allow; to tolerate.
  26. (transitive, often used in the negative) To believe, buy, be taken in by.
  27. (transitive) To host someone; to take in as a guest.
  28. (transitive) To get a reading, measurement, or result from an instrument or calculation.
  29. (transitive, of a jury) To consider a court proceeding that has been completed; to begin deliberations on a case.
  30. (transitive, birdwatching) To make an observation of (a bird species).
Usage notes

In certain dialects, expressions, and literary use, the lexical have need not use do-support, meaning the sentence Do you have an idea? can also be Have you an idea? This makes have the only lexical verb in Modern English that can function without it, aside from some nonce examples with other verbs in set phrases, as in What say you?, and aside from the verb ‘be’ where this is considered lexical. The auxiliary have which forms the perfect tense never uses do-support, so Have you seen it? cannot be Do you have seen it?.

Conjugation

Additional archaic forms are second-person singular present tense hast, third-person singular present tense hath, present participle haveing, and second-person singular past tense hadst.

Synonyms
  • (engage in sexual intercourse with): have one’s way with, sleep with, take; see also Thesaurus:copulate with
Derived terms
Translations

Noun

have (plural haves)

  1. A wealthy or privileged person.
    • 1981, Sepia:
      A good credit rating can mean the difference between being a have or a have not.
    • 1999, Various, The Haves and Have Nots (Penguin, →ISBN)
      While these stories serve to make us conscious of the implications of being a “have” or a “have-not,” as with all good literature, they do much more than that. They provide a glimpse into lives that we might never encounter elsewhere.
  2. (uncommon) One who has some (contextually specified) thing.
    • 2010, Simon Collin, Dictionary of Wine (A&C Black, →ISBN):
      To find out whether you are a have or a have not, did you understand the malo and Brett sentence a few lines back? If no, this doesn’t make any difference to me, as you are the proud possessor of something the ‘haves’ haven’t got. You know exactly what you like and why you like it. The ‘haves’ pretend to like and understand everything, which by the way is impossible. They deliberate over choosing a bottle in the shop for hours, …
    • 2013, Kelda, Men Under a Microscope (Author House, →ISBN), page 57:
      Generally, I can assure you that a woman’s posterior causes a stir, whether she’s considered a have or a have not. But in most cases, men gravitate toward a pair of prominent gluteus muscles because they find this display appealing. This prominent protrusion can make a pair of jeans look like it was painted on, above just being good to look at. And by the way, it also incites some backshot (a Caribbean term for a well-known sex position) and spanking tendencies during sexual activity …
    • 2014, Derek Prince, Ultimate Security: Finding a Refuge in Difficult Times (Whitaker House, →ISBN):
      The question you must answer is, “Do you have Jesus?” In Jesus, you have eternal life. If you do not have Jesus—if you have not received Him—you do not have “the life.” Are you a “have,” or are you a “have not”? That is a vital decision every person must make—a critical issue you have to resolve for yourself.
Antonyms
  • have-not

See also

  • auxiliary verb
  • past tense
  • perfect tense

References

Etymology 2

From have on (to deceive).

Noun

have (plural haves)

  1. (Australia, New Zealand, informal) A fraud or deception; something misleading.

References

  • have at OneLook Dictionary Search

Anagrams

  • evah

Danish

Etymology 1

From Old Norse hagi, from Proto-Germanic *hagô, cognate with Norwegian hage, Swedish hage, English haw, German Hag, Dutch haag.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /haːvə/, [ˈhæːʋə], [ˈhæːʊ]

Noun

have c (singular definite haven, plural indefinite haver)

  1. garden
  2. orchard
  3. allotment
Inflection

References

  • “have,1” in Den Danske Ordbog

Etymology 2

From Old Norse hafa (to have, wear, carry), from Proto-Germanic *habjaną (to have, hold), cognate with English have, German haben.

Alternative forms

  • ha’

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ha(ːˀ)/, [ˈha], [ˈhæˀ], (formal) IPA(key): /haːvə/, [ˈhæːʋə], [ˈhæːʊ]

Verb

have (present tense har, past tense havde, past participle haft)

  1. (transitive) to have, have got
  2. (auxiliary, with the past participle) have (forms perfect tense)
Inflection
Derived terms
  • have det
  • have for
  • have på
  • have tilbage

References

  • “have,2” in Den Danske Ordbog

Etymology 3

See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /haːvə/, [ˈhæːʋə], [ˈhæːʊ]

Noun

have n

  1. indefinite plural of hav

Dutch

Etymology

From Middle Dutch have, derived from the verb hebben (to have).

Pronunciation

Noun

have f (plural haven)

  1. property, possession

Derived terms

  • haveloos

Latin

Pronunciation

  • (Classical) IPA(key): /ˈha.u̯e/, [ˈhäu̯ɛ]
  • (Affectation) (Classical) IPA(key): /ˈa.u̯eː/, [ˈäu̯eː]
  • (Ecclesiastical) IPA(key): /ˈa.ve/, [ˈɑːvɛ]
  • See pronunciation note at the headword’s page.

Interjection

have

  1. Alternative spelling of ave (hail!)

Middle English

Verb

have

  1. Alternative form of haven (to have)

Norman

Etymology

Borrowed from Old Norse háfr (net), from Proto-Germanic *hēb-, *hēf-, an ablaut form of *hafjaną (to have; take; catch). Related to English dialectal haaf (a pock-net).

Pronunciation

Noun

have f (plural haves)

  1. (Jersey) shrimp net

Norwegian Nynorsk

Alternative forms

  • hava (a and split infinitives)
  • ha

Etymology

From Old Norse hafa, from Proto-Germanic *habjaną (to have), durative of Proto-Germanic *habjaną (to lift, take up), from Proto-Indo-European *keh₂p- (to take, seize, catch).

Verb

have (present tense hev, past tense havde, past participle havt, passive infinitive havast, present participle havande, imperative hav)

  1. form removed with the spelling reform of 2012; superseded by ha

Tarantino

Verb

have

  1. third-person singular present indicative of avere

Please follow and like us:

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Social Share Buttons and Icons powered by Ultimatelysocial