feature vs sport what difference

what is difference between feature and sport

English

Etymology

From Middle English feture, from Anglo-Norman feture, from Old French faiture, from Latin factūra. Doublet of facture.

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /ˈfiːtʃə/
  • (General American) IPA(key): /ˈfitʃɚ/
  • Rhymes: -iːtʃə(ɹ)

Noun

feature (plural features)

  1. (obsolete) One’s structure or make-up: form, shape, bodily proportions.
    • 1596, Edmund Spenser, The Faerie Queene, IV.ii:
      all the powres of nature, / Which she by art could vse vnto her will, / And to her seruice bind each liuing creature; / Through secret vnderstanding of their feature.
  2. An important or main item.
  3. (media) A long, prominent article or item in the media, or the department that creates them; frequently used technically to distinguish content from news.
    1. (film) Ellipsis of feature film
  4. Any of the physical constituents of the face (eyes, nose, etc.).
  5. (computing) A beneficial capability of a piece of software.
  6. The cast or structure of anything, or of any part of a thing, as of a landscape, a picture, a treaty, or an essay; any marked peculiarity or characteristic.
  7. (archaeology) Something discerned from physical evidence that helps define, identify, characterize, and interpret an archeological site.
    • A feature of many Central Texas prehistoric archeological sites is a low spreading pile of stones called a rock midden. Other features at these sites may include small hearths.
  8. (engineering) Characteristic forms or shapes of parts. For example, a hole, boss, slot, cut, chamfer, or fillet.
  9. (statistics, machine learning) An individual measurable property or characteristic of a phenomenon being observed.
  10. (music) The act of being featured in a piece of music.
  11. (linguistics) The elements into which linguistic units can be broken down.
    Hyponyms: gender, number, person, tense

Synonyms

  • See also Thesaurus:characteristic

Derived terms

  • featural
  • feature article

Translations

Further reading

  • feature in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.

Verb

feature (third-person singular simple present features, present participle featuring, simple past and past participle featured)

  1. (transitive) To ascribe the greatest importance to something within a certain context.
  2. (transitive) To star, to contain.
  3. (intransitive) To appear, to make an appearance.
  4. (transitive, dated) To have features resembling.
    • Sunday. Reading for the Young (page 219)
      More than his talents, Roger grudged him his looks, the brown eyes, golden hair, and oval face, which made people say how Johnny Weir featured his mother.

Translations


Middle English

Noun

feature

  1. Alternative form of feture


English

Etymology

From Middle English sporten (verb) and sport, spoort, sporte (noun), apheretic shortenings of disporten (verb) and disport, disporte (noun). More at disport.

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /spɔːt/
  • (General American) IPA(key): /spɔɹt/
  • (Tasmanian) IPA(key): /spɔː/
  • (rhotic, without the horsehoarse merger) IPA(key): /spo(ː)ɹt/
  • (non-rhotic, without the horsehoarse merger) IPA(key): /spoət/
  • Rhymes: -ɔː(ɹ)t

Noun

sport (countable and uncountable, plural sports)

  1. (countable) Any activity that uses physical exertion or skills competitively under a set of rules that is not based on aesthetics.
  2. (countable) Something done for fun, regardless of its design or intended purpose.
  3. (countable) A person who exhibits either good or bad sportsmanship.
  4. (countable) Somebody who behaves or reacts in an admirably good-natured manner, e.g. to being teased or to losing a game; a good sport.
  5. (obsolete) That which diverts, and makes mirth; pastime; amusement.
    • a. 1765, year of origin unknown, Hey Diddle Diddle (traditional rhyme)
      The little dog laughed to see such sport, and the dish ran away with the spoon.
    Synonyms: see Thesaurus:hobby
  6. (obsolete) Mockery, making fun; derision.
  7. (countable) A toy; a plaything; an object of mockery.
    • flitting leaves, the sport of every wind
    • a. 1676, John Clarke, On Governing the Temper
      Never does man appear to greater disadvantage than when he is the sport of his own ungoverned passions.
  8. (uncountable) Gaming for money as in racing, hunting, fishing.
  9. (biology, botany, zoology, countable) A plant or an animal, or part of a plant or animal, which has some peculiarity not usually seen in the species; an abnormal variety or growth. The term encompasses both mutants and organisms with non-genetic developmental abnormalities such as birth defects.
  10. (slang, countable) A sportsman; a gambler.
  11. (slang, countable) One who consorts with disreputable people, including prostitutes.
  12. (obsolete, uncountable) An amorous dalliance.
  13. (informal, usually singular) A friend or acquaintance (chiefly used when speaking to the friend in question)
    Synonyms: see Thesaurus:friend
  14. (obsolete) Play; idle jingle.
    • 1725-1726, William Broome, The Odyssey
      An author who should introduce such a sport of words upon our stage [] would meet with small applause.

Derived terms

Descendants

  • Japanese: スポーツ (supōtsu) (from sports)
  • Korean: 스포츠 (seupocheu) (from sports)

Translations

Verb

sport (third-person singular simple present sports, present participle sporting, simple past and past participle sported)

  1. (intransitive) To amuse oneself, to play.
  2. (intransitive) To mock or tease, treat lightly, toy with.
    • 1663, John Tillotson, The Wisdom of being Religious
      He sports with his own life.
  3. (transitive) To display; to have as a notable feature.
  4. (reflexive) To divert; to amuse; to make merry.
    • Against whom do ye sport yourselves?
  5. (transitive) To represent by any kind of play.
    • Now sporting on thy lyre the loves of youth.
  6. To practise the diversions of the field or the turf; to be given to betting, as upon races.
  7. To assume suddenly a new and different character from the rest of the plant or from the type of the species; said of a bud, shoot, plant, or animal.
    • 1860, Charles Darwin, The Variation of Animals and Plants Under Domestication
      more than one kind of rose has sported into a moss
  8. (transitive) To close (a door).
    • 1904, M. R. James, The Mezzotint
      There he locked it up in a drawer, sported the doors of both sets of rooms, and retired to bed.

Translations

Anagrams

  • -prost, -prost-, Ports, Prost, ports, strop, torps, trops.

Czech

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ˈsport]

Noun

sport m inan

  1. sport

Declension

Derived terms

Related terms

  • sportovat
  • sportovec m

Further reading

  • sport in Příruční slovník jazyka českého, 1935–1957
  • sport in Slovník spisovného jazyka českého, 1960–1971, 1989

Dutch

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /spɔrt/
  • Hyphenation: sport
  • Rhymes: -ɔrt

Etymology 1

Borrowed from English sport, from Middle English sport, from Middle English sport, from older disport, from Old French desport. First attested in the 19th century. This etymology is incomplete. You can help Wiktionary by elaborating on the origins of this term.

Noun

sport f (plural sporten, diminutive sportje n)

  1. (countable) A sport; (uncountable) sports.
Derived terms
Descendants
  • Papiamentu: spòrt

Etymology 2

From Middle Dutch sporte, metathesised form of sprote. This etymology is incomplete. You can help Wiktionary by elaborating on the origins of this term.

Noun

sport f (plural sporten, diminutive sportje n)

  1. rung, step on a ladder
Descendants
  • Papiamentu: spor, sport

Etymology 3

See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

Verb

sport

  1. first-, second- and third-person singular present indicative of sporten
  2. imperative of sporten

Anagrams

  • sprot, strop

Estonian

Noun

sport (genitive spordi, partitive sporti)

  1. sport, sports

Declension


French

Etymology

Borrowed from English sport.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /spɔʁ/

Noun

sport m (plural sports)

  1. sport

Derived terms

Further reading

  • “sport” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

Hungarian

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ˈʃport]
  • Hyphenation: sport
  • Rhymes: -ort

Noun

sport (plural sportok)

  1. sport

Declension

Derived terms

Further reading

  • sport in Bárczi, Géza and László Országh. A magyar nyelv értelmező szótára (’The Explanatory Dictionary of the Hungarian Language’). Budapest: Akadémiai Kiadó, 1959–1962. Fifth ed., 1992: →ISBN

Italian

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈspɔrt/

Noun

sport m (invariable)

  1. sport (activity that uses physical skills, often competitive)
  2. hobby, pastime

Derived terms


Lower Sorbian

Etymology

Borrowed from English sport.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /spɔrt/

Noun

sport m

  1. sport (athletic activity that uses physical skills)

Declension

References

  • sport in Manfred Starosta (1999): Dolnoserbsko-nimski słownik / Niedersorbisch-deutsches Wörterbuch. Bautzen: Domowina-Verlag.

Norman

Noun

sport m (plural sports)

  1. (Jersey) sport (physical activity pitting two or more opponents against each other)

Norwegian Bokmål

Etymology 1

From English sport

Noun

sport m (definite singular sporten, uncountable)

  1. sport
    Synonym: idrett
Derived terms

Etymology 2

See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

Alternative forms

  • spora, sporet

Verb

sport

  1. past participle of spore

References

  • “sport” in The Bokmål Dictionary.

Norwegian Nynorsk

Etymology

From English sport

Noun

sport m (definite singular sporten, uncountable)

  1. sport
    Synonym: idrett

Derived terms

  • hestesport
  • kampsport

References

  • “sport” in The Nynorsk Dictionary.

Polish

Etymology

Borrowed from English sport.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /spɔrt/

Noun

sport m inan

  1. sport

Declension

Derived terms

Further reading

  • sport in Polish dictionaries at PWN

Romanian

Etymology

From French sport.

Noun

sport n (plural sporturi)

  1. sport

Declension


Serbo-Croatian

Alternative forms

  • špȍrt (Croatia)

Etymology

Borrowed from English sport.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /spôrt/

Noun

spȍrt m (Cyrillic spelling спо̏рт)

  1. sport

Declension

Derived terms


Swedish

Etymology 1

Borrowed from English sport, first used in 1857.

Pronunciation 1

  • IPA(key): /ˈspɔʈ/

Noun

sport c

  1. sport

Declension

Derived terms

See also

  • idrott

References

  • sport in Nationalencyklopedin (needs an authorization fee).
  • sport in Svenska Akademiens ordbok (SAOB)

Etymology 2

See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

Pronunciation 2

  • IPA(key): /ˈspʊʈ/

Verb

sport

  1. supine of spörja.

Anagrams

  • ports, prost, torps

West Frisian

Etymology

Borrowed from Dutch sport, from English sport.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /spɔ(r)t/

Noun

sport c (plural sporten)

  1. sport (physical activity)

Further reading

  • “sport”, in Wurdboek fan de Fryske taal (in Dutch), 2011

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