feed vs fertilize what difference

what is difference between feed and fertilize

English

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈfiːd/
  • Rhymes: -iːd

Etymology 1

From Middle English feden, from Old English fēdan (to feed), from Proto-Germanic *fōdijaną (to feed), from Proto-Indo-European *peh₂- (to guard, graze, feed). Cognate with West Frisian fiede (to nourish, feed), Dutch voeden (to feed), Danish føde (to bring forth, feed), Swedish föda (to bring forth, feed), Icelandic fæða (to feed), and more distantly with Latin pāscō (feed, nourish, verb) through Indo-European. More at food, fodder.

Verb

feed (third-person singular simple present feeds, present participle feeding, simple past and past participle fed)

  1. (ditransitive) To give (someone or something) food to eat.
    • If thine enemy hunger, feed him.
  2. (intransitive) To eat (usually of animals).
  3. (transitive) To give (someone or something) to (someone or something else) as food.
    • 2012 December 25 (airdate), Steven Moffat, The Snowmen (Doctor Who)
      DR SIMEON: I said I’d feed you. I didn’t say who to.
  4. (transitive) To give to a machine to be processed.
  5. (figuratively) To satisfy, gratify, or minister to (a sense, taste, desire, etc.).
    • 1596-97, William Shakespeare, The Merchant of Venice, Act I, Scene iii[1]:
      If I can catch him once upon the hip, / I will feed fat the ancient grudge I bear him.
    • feeding him with the hope of liberty
  6. To supply with something.
  7. To graze; to cause to be cropped by feeding, as herbage by cattle.
    • Once in three years, or every other year, feed your mowing-lands.
  8. (sports, transitive) To pass to.
  9. (phonology, of a phonological rule) To create the environment where another phonological rule can apply; to be applied before another rule.
  10. (syntax, of a syntactic rule) To create the syntactic environment in which another syntactic rule is applied; to be applied before another syntactic rule.
Synonyms
  • (to give food to eat): nourish
Derived terms
  • underfeed
Translations

Noun

feed (countable and uncountable, plural feeds)

  1. (uncountable) Food given to (especially herbivorous) animals.
  2. Something supplied continuously.
  3. The part of a machine that supplies the material to be operated upon.
  4. The forward motion of the material fed into a machine.
  5. (Britain, Australia, New Zealand, colloquial, countable) A meal.
    • 184?, Henry Mayhew, London Labour and the London Poor
      One proposed going to Hungerford-market to do a feed on decayed shrimps or other offal laying about the market; another proposed going to Covent-garden to do a ‘tightener’ of rotten oranges, to which I was humorously invited; []
  6. (countable) A gathering to eat, especially in quantity.
  7. (Internet) Encapsulated online content, such as news or a blog, that can be subscribed to.
  8. A straight man who delivers lines to the comedian during a performance.
    • 2020, Oliver Double, Alternative Comedy: 1979 and the Reinvention of British Stand-Up (page 38)
      Don Ward is often described as a former comic, having some experience in this area as a young man, acting as a feed for the comic actor David Lodge at Parkins Holiday Camp in Jersey []
Derived terms
Translations

Derived terms

Etymology 2

fee + -(e)d

Verb

feed

  1. simple past tense and past participle of fee

Anagrams

  • deef, e-fed

Dutch

Etymology

From English feed.

Noun

feed m (plural feeds)

  1. encapsulated online content, such as news or a blog, that can be subscribed to; a feed
  2. a mechanism on social media for users to receive updates from their network

Manx

Etymology

From Old Irish fichet (compare Scottish Gaelic fichead), genitive singular of fiche (twenty), from Proto-Celtic *wikantī (compare Welsh ugain), from Proto-Indo-European *h₁wih₁ḱm̥t (compare Latin vīgintī), from *dwi(h₁)dḱm̥ti (two-ten).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /fiːdʒ/

Numeral

feed

  1. twenty

References

  • Gregory Toner, Maire Ní Mhaonaigh, Sharon Arbuthnot, Dagmar Wodtko, Maire-Luise Theuerkauf, editors (2019), “fiche”, in eDIL: Electronic Dictionary of the Irish Language

Portuguese

Etymology

Borrowed from English feed.

Pronunciation

  • (Brazil) IPA(key): /ˈfid͡ʒ/

Noun

feed m (plural feeds)

  1. (Internet) feed (encapsulated online content that one can subscribe to)

Spanish

Etymology

Borrowed from English feed.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈfid/, [ˈfið̞]

Noun

feed m (plural feeds)

  1. (Internet) feed (encapsulated online content that one can subscribe to)


English

Alternative forms

  • fertilise (mostly British)

Etymology

From French fertiliser; equivalent to fertile +‎ -ize

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈfɜː(ɹ)tɪlaɪz/

Verb

fertilize (third-person singular simple present fertilizes, present participle fertilizing, simple past and past participle fertilized)

  1. To make (the soil) more fertile by adding nutrients to it.
  2. (figuratively) To make more creative or intellectually productive.
    to fertilize one’s imagination
  3. To cause to produce offspring through insemination; to inseminate.

Derived terms

  • fertilizer

Translations


Portuguese

Verb

fertilize

  1. First-person singular (eu) present subjunctive of fertilizar
  2. Third-person singular (ele, ela, also used with tu and você?) present subjunctive of fertilizar
  3. Third-person singular (você) affirmative imperative of fertilizar
  4. Third-person singular (você) negative imperative of fertilizar

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