feel vs find what difference

what is difference between feel and find

English

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /fiːl/, [fiːɫ]
  • Rhymes: -iːl

Etymology 1

From Middle English felen, from Old English fēlan (to feel, perceive, touch), from Proto-West Germanic *fōlijan (to feel).

Verb

feel (third-person singular simple present feels, present participle feeling, simple past and past participle felt)

  1. (heading) To use or experience the sense of touch.
    1. (transitive, copulative) To become aware of through the skin; to use the sense of touch on.
    2. (transitive) To find one’s way (literally or figuratively) by touching or using cautious movements.
    3. (intransitive) To receive information by touch or by any neurons other than those responsible for sight, smell, taste, or hearing.
    4. (intransitive) To search by sense of touch.
  2. (heading) To sense or think emotionally or judgmentally.
    1. (transitive) To experience an emotion or other mental state about.
      • Captain Edward Carlisle, soldier as he was, martinet as he was, felt a curious sensation of helplessness seize upon him as he met her steady gaze, her alluring smile ; he could not tell what this prisoner might do.
    2. (transitive) To think, believe, or have an impression concerning.
    3. (intransitive, copulative) To experience an emotion or other mental state.
    4. (intransitive) To sympathise; to have the sensibilities moved or affected.
      • 1790, Edmund Burke, Reflections on the Revolution in France
        [She] feels with the dignity of a Roman matron.
      • 1738, Alexander Pope, Epilogue to the Satires
        who feel for all mankind
  3. (transitive) To be or become aware of.
  4. (transitive) To experience the consequences of.
  5. (copulative) To seem (through touch or otherwise).
  6. (transitive, US, slang) To understand.
Usage notes
  • When referring to the emotional state, most prescriptive grammarians prefer “I feel bad” to “I feel badly”, but “I feel badly” is widely used this way in US English.
  • Adjectives to which “feel” is often applied as a copula: free, cold, cool, warm, hot, young, old, good, great, fine, happy, glad, satisfied, excited, bad, depressed, unhappy, sad, blue, sorry, smart, stupid, loved, appreciated, accepted, rejected, lonely, isolated, insulted, offended, slighted, cheated, shy, refreshed, tired, exhausted, calm, relaxed, angry, annoyed, frustrated, anxious, worried, jealous, proud, confident, safe, grateful, uncomfortable, unsafe, insecure, desperate, guilty, ashamed, disappointed, dirty, odd, strange, ill, sick.
  • In senses 2,3, and 5, this is generally a stative verb that rarely takes the continuous inflection. See Category:English stative verbs
  • In older forms of English, when the pronoun thou was in active use, and verbs used -est for distinct second-person singular indicative forms, the verb feel had the form feelest, and had feltest for its past tense.
  • Similarly, when the ending -eth was in active use for third-person singular present indicative forms, the form feeleth was used.
Derived terms
Translations

Noun

feel (plural feels)

  1. A quality of an object experienced by touch.
    Bark has a rough feel.
    • 1902, John Buchan, The Outgoing of the Tide
      And then something in the sound or the feel of the waters made him look down, and he perceived that the ebb had begun and the tide was flowing out to sea.
  2. A vague mental impression.
    You should get a feel of the area before moving in.
  3. An act of fondling.
    She gave me a quick feel to show that she loves me.
  4. A vague understanding.
    I’m getting a feel for what you mean.
  5. An intuitive ability.
    She has a feel for music.
  6. (chiefly US, slang) A feeling; an emotion.
    I know that feel.
Derived terms
  • cop a feel
  • get a feel for
  • mouthfeel
Descendants
  • Korean: (ppil)
Translations

Etymology 2

See fele.

Pronoun

feel

  1. (dialectal or obsolete) Alternative form of fele

Adjective

feel (not comparable)

  1. (dialectal or obsolete) Alternative form of fele

Adverb

feel (not comparable)

  1. (dialectal or obsolete) Alternative form of fele

References

Anagrams

  • elfe, fele, flee, leef

North Frisian

Etymology

From Old Frisian fēla.

Verb

feel

  1. (Föhr-Amrum) to feel

Old Catalan

Etymology

Inherited from Latin fidēlem (faithful). Replaced by the borrowing fidel in modern Catalan.

Adjective

feel

  1. faithful

Seri

Noun

feel (plural feeloj)

  1. mallard, Anas platyrhynchos


English

Etymology

From Middle English finden, from Old English findan, from Proto-West Germanic *finþan, from Proto-Germanic *finþaną (compare West Frisian fine, Low German finden, Dutch vinden, German finden, Danish finde, Norwegian Bokmål finne, Norwegian Nynorsk and Swedish finna), a secondary verb from Proto-Indo-European *pent- (to go, pass; path bridge), *póntoh₁s (compare English path, Old Irish étain (I find), áitt (place), Latin pōns (bridge), Ancient Greek πόντος (póntos, sea), Old Armenian հուն (hun, ford), Avestan ????????????????????(paṇtā̊), Sanskrit पथ (pathá, path)), Proto-Slavic *pǫtь.

Pronunciation

  • enPR: fīnd, IPA(key): /faɪnd/
  • Rhymes: -aɪnd
  • Homophone: fined

Verb

find (third-person singular simple present finds, present participle finding, simple past found or (dialectal) fand, past participle found or (archaic) founden)

  1. (transitive) To encounter or discover by accident; to happen upon.
    • a. 1667, Abraham Cowley, The Request
      Among the Woods and Forests thou art found.
  2. (transitive) To encounter or discover something being searched for; to locate.
  3. (ditransitive) To discover by study or experiment direct to an object or end.
  4. (transitive) To gain, as the object of desire or effort.
  5. (transitive) To attain to; to arrive at; to acquire.
  6. (transitive) To point out.
  7. (ditransitive) To decide that, to discover that, to form the opinion that.
    • 1647, Abraham Cowley, The Request
      The torrid zone is now found habitable.
  8. (transitive) To arrive at, as a conclusion; to determine as true; to establish.
  9. (transitive, archaic) To supply; to furnish.
  10. (transitive, archaic) To provide for
    • 1871, Charles Kingsley, At Last: a Christmas in the West Indies
      Nothing a day and find yourself.
    • 1892, W. E. Swanton, Notes on New Zealand
      the pay is good, the musterer receiving ten shillings a day, and all found, all the time he is engaged on the “run,” even should he be compelled to remain idle on account of rain or mist.
  11. (intransitive, law) To determine or judge.
  12. (intransitive, hunting) To discover game.
    • 1945, Nancy Mitford, The Pursuit of Love, Penguin 2010, page 57:
      They found at once, and there was a short sharp run, during which Linda and Tony, both in a somewhat showing-off mood, rode side by side over the stone walls.

Synonyms

  • See also Thesaurus:deem

Antonyms

  • lose

Derived terms

  • befind
  • findable
  • finder
  • hard-to-find
  • viewfinder
  • unfindable

Related terms

See also finding and found

Translations

Noun

find (plural finds)

  1. Anything that is found (usually valuable), as objects on an archeological site or a person with talent.
  2. The act of finding.
    (Can we add an example for this sense?)

Synonyms

  • (anything found): discovery, catch

Translations

Further reading

  • find in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.
  • find in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.

Anagrams

  • NFID

Danish

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /fend/, [fenˀ]
  • Rhymes: -end

Verb

find

  1. imperative of finde

Middle English

Noun

find (plural findes)

  1. Alternative form of feend

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