feel vs finger what difference

what is difference between feel and finger

English

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /fiːl/, [fiːɫ]
  • Rhymes: -iːl

Etymology 1

From Middle English felen, from Old English fēlan (to feel, perceive, touch), from Proto-West Germanic *fōlijan (to feel).

Verb

feel (third-person singular simple present feels, present participle feeling, simple past and past participle felt)

  1. (heading) To use or experience the sense of touch.
    1. (transitive, copulative) To become aware of through the skin; to use the sense of touch on.
    2. (transitive) To find one’s way (literally or figuratively) by touching or using cautious movements.
    3. (intransitive) To receive information by touch or by any neurons other than those responsible for sight, smell, taste, or hearing.
    4. (intransitive) To search by sense of touch.
  2. (heading) To sense or think emotionally or judgmentally.
    1. (transitive) To experience an emotion or other mental state about.
      • Captain Edward Carlisle, soldier as he was, martinet as he was, felt a curious sensation of helplessness seize upon him as he met her steady gaze, her alluring smile ; he could not tell what this prisoner might do.
    2. (transitive) To think, believe, or have an impression concerning.
    3. (intransitive, copulative) To experience an emotion or other mental state.
    4. (intransitive) To sympathise; to have the sensibilities moved or affected.
      • 1790, Edmund Burke, Reflections on the Revolution in France
        [She] feels with the dignity of a Roman matron.
      • 1738, Alexander Pope, Epilogue to the Satires
        who feel for all mankind
  3. (transitive) To be or become aware of.
  4. (transitive) To experience the consequences of.
  5. (copulative) To seem (through touch or otherwise).
  6. (transitive, US, slang) To understand.
Usage notes
  • When referring to the emotional state, most prescriptive grammarians prefer “I feel bad” to “I feel badly”, but “I feel badly” is widely used this way in US English.
  • Adjectives to which “feel” is often applied as a copula: free, cold, cool, warm, hot, young, old, good, great, fine, happy, glad, satisfied, excited, bad, depressed, unhappy, sad, blue, sorry, smart, stupid, loved, appreciated, accepted, rejected, lonely, isolated, insulted, offended, slighted, cheated, shy, refreshed, tired, exhausted, calm, relaxed, angry, annoyed, frustrated, anxious, worried, jealous, proud, confident, safe, grateful, uncomfortable, unsafe, insecure, desperate, guilty, ashamed, disappointed, dirty, odd, strange, ill, sick.
  • In senses 2,3, and 5, this is generally a stative verb that rarely takes the continuous inflection. See Category:English stative verbs
  • In older forms of English, when the pronoun thou was in active use, and verbs used -est for distinct second-person singular indicative forms, the verb feel had the form feelest, and had feltest for its past tense.
  • Similarly, when the ending -eth was in active use for third-person singular present indicative forms, the form feeleth was used.
Derived terms
Translations

Noun

feel (plural feels)

  1. A quality of an object experienced by touch.
    Bark has a rough feel.
    • 1902, John Buchan, The Outgoing of the Tide
      And then something in the sound or the feel of the waters made him look down, and he perceived that the ebb had begun and the tide was flowing out to sea.
  2. A vague mental impression.
    You should get a feel of the area before moving in.
  3. An act of fondling.
    She gave me a quick feel to show that she loves me.
  4. A vague understanding.
    I’m getting a feel for what you mean.
  5. An intuitive ability.
    She has a feel for music.
  6. (chiefly US, slang) A feeling; an emotion.
    I know that feel.
Derived terms
  • cop a feel
  • get a feel for
  • mouthfeel
Descendants
  • Korean: (ppil)
Translations

Etymology 2

See fele.

Pronoun

feel

  1. (dialectal or obsolete) Alternative form of fele

Adjective

feel (not comparable)

  1. (dialectal or obsolete) Alternative form of fele

Adverb

feel (not comparable)

  1. (dialectal or obsolete) Alternative form of fele

References

Anagrams

  • elfe, fele, flee, leef

North Frisian

Etymology

From Old Frisian fēla.

Verb

feel

  1. (Föhr-Amrum) to feel

Old Catalan

Etymology

Inherited from Latin fidēlem (faithful). Replaced by the borrowing fidel in modern Catalan.

Adjective

feel

  1. faithful

Seri

Noun

feel (plural feeloj)

  1. mallard, Anas platyrhynchos


English

Etymology

From Middle English fynger, finger, from Old English finger (finger), from Proto-West Germanic *fingr, from Proto-Germanic *fingraz (finger), from Proto-Indo-European *pénkʷrós, *penkʷ-ros (fifth), from *pénkʷe (five)

Compare West Frisian finger, Low German/German Finger, Dutch vinger, Danish finger); also Old Irish cóicer (set of five people), Old Armenian հինգեր-որդ (hinger-ord, fifth)). More at five.

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /ˈfɪŋɡə/
  • (General American) enPR: fĭngʹ-gər, IPA(key): /ˈfɪŋɡɚ/
  • (Scotland) IPA(key): /ˈfɪŋəɹ/
  • Rhymes: -ɪŋɡə(ɹ)
  • Hyphenation: fin‧ger

Noun

finger (plural fingers)

  1. (anatomy) A slender jointed extremity of the human hand, (often) exclusive of the thumb.
    • 1916, The Finger Talk of Chicago’s Wheat-Pit, Popular Science Monthly, Vol. 89, p. 81:
      Each finger extended represents one-eighth of a cent. Thus when all four fingers and the thumb are extended, all being spread out from one another, it means five-eighths.
  2. (zoology) Similar or similar-looking extremities in other animals, particularly:
    • 1915, Eleanor Stackhouse Atkinson, The How and Why Library, Life, Section VIII,
      The starfish eats with five fingers.
    1. The lower, smaller segment of an arthropod claw.
    2. One of the supporting structures of wings in birds, bats, etc. evolved from earlier toes or fingers.
    3. One of the slender bony structures before the pectoral fins of gurnards and sea robins (Triglidae).
  3. Something similar in shape to the human finger, particularly:
    • 1814, William Wordsworth, The Excursion, p. 250:
      …spires whose ‘silent finger points to Heaven’…
    1. (cooking) Finger-shaped pieces of food.
      • 2014, Laurie David, The Family Cooks
        By now, we hope you have said “no” to processed nuggets and fingers. Instead, how about taking some real chicken, tossing it with real eggs, a little tangy mustard, and a crunchy quinoa coating?
    2. (chemistry) A tube extending from a sealed system, or sometimes into one in the case of a cold finger.
      • 1996, Susan Trumbore, Mass Spectrometry of Soils, p. 318:
        An oven is placed over the finger with Co catalyst (oven temperature will depend on whether a quartz or Pyrex finger is used, see Ref. 24), and a cold finger (usually a copper rod immersed in dry ice–isopropanol slurry) is placed on the other tube.
    3. (Britain regional, botany, usually in the plural, obsolete) Synonym of foxglove (D. purpurea).
  4. Something similarly extending, (especially) from a larger body, particularly:
    a finger of land; a finger of smoke
    1. (botany) Various protruding plant structures, as a banana from its hand.
    2. (anatomy, obsolete) A lobe of the liver.
    3. (historical) The teeth parallel to the blade of a scythe, fitted to a wooden frame called a crade.
    4. The projections of a reaper or mower which similarly separate the stalks for cutting.
    5. (nautical) Clipping of finger pier: a shorter, narrower pier projecting from a larger dock.
    6. (aviation) Synonym of jet bridge: the narrow elevated walkway connecting a plane to an airport.
  5. Something similar in function or agency to the human finger, (usually) with regard to touching, grasping, or pointing.
    • 1611, Bible (KJV), Exodus 8:19:
      The Magicians said vnto Pharaoh; This is the finger of God.
    1. (obsolete) Synonym of hand, the part of a clock pointing to the hour, minute, or second.
    2. (US, obsolete slang) A policeman or prison guard.
    3. (US, rare slang) An informer to the police, (especially) one who identifies a criminal during a lineup.
    4. (US, rare slang) A criminal who scouts for prospective victims and targets or who performs reconnaissance before a crime.
    5. (figuratively) That which points; an indicator, as of guilt, blame, or suspicion.
      The finger of suspicion pointed clearly at the hotel manager.
  6. (units of measure) Various units of measure based or notionally based on the adult human finger, particularly
    1. (historical) Synonym of digit: former units of measure notionally based on its width but variously standardized, (especially) the English digit of 116 foot (about 1.9 cm).
      • 1648, John Wilkins, Mathematical Magick
        a piece of steel three fingers thick
    2. (historical) A unit of length notionally based on the length of an adult human’s middle finger, standardized as 4½ inches (11.43 cm).
    3. (historical) Synonym of digit: 112 the observed diameter of the sun or moon, (especially) with regard to eclipses.
    4. (originally US) An informal measure of alcohol based on its height in a given glass compared to the width of the pourer’s fingers while holding it.
      Gimme three fingers of bourbon.
  7. (fashion) A part of a glove intended to cover a finger.
  8. (informal, obsolete) Skill in the use of the fingers, as in playing upon a musical instrument.
    • 1786, Thomas Busby, Musical Dictionary
      A performer capable of doing justice to rapid or expressive passages, is said to have a good finger
  9. (informal, rare) Someone skilled in the use of their fingers, (especially) a pickpocket.
  10. (Britain slang) A person.
  11. (especially in the phrase ‘give someone the finger’) An obscene or insulting gesture made by raising one’s middle finger towards someone with the palm of one’s hand facing inwards.
  12. (vulgar) The act of fingering, inserting a finger into someone’s vagina or rectum for sexual pleasure.

Synonyms

  • (anatomy): See Thesaurus:finger
  • (zoology): toe (when on four legs); claw, talon (usually sharp)
  • (finger-shaped objects): tendril (in plants)
  • (airport walkway): See jet bridge
  • (finger width): See digit
  • (slang for police informer): See Thesaurus:informant
  • (skill with the fingers): fingering technique; touch
  • (British slang for person): bloke, lad, boy, guv

Hyponyms

  • (anatomy): index finger, forefinger; middle finger; ring finger; little finger, pinkie; thumb, hallux

Derived terms

Descendants

  • Sranan Tongo: finga

Translations

See finger/translations § Noun.

Verb

finger (third-person singular simple present fingers, present participle fingering, simple past and past participle fingered)

  1. (transitive) To identify or point out. Also put the finger on. To report to or identify for the authorities, rat on, rat out, squeal on, tattle on, turn in.
  2. (transitive) To poke, probe, feel, or fondle with a finger or fingers.
  3. (transitive) To use the fingers to penetrate and sexually stimulate one’s own or another person’s vagina or anus; to fingerbang
    • 2008, Thomas Wainwright (editor), Erotic Tales, page 56:
      She smiled, a look of amazement on her face, as if thinking that maybe this was the cock that she had been fantasizing about just now, as she fingered herself to a massive, body-engulfing orgasm.
  4. (transitive, music) To use specified finger positions in producing notes on a musical instrument.
  5. (transitive, music) To provide instructions in written music as to which fingers are to be used to produce particular notes or passages.
  6. (transitive, computing) To query (a user’s status) using the Finger protocol.
    • 1996, “Yves Bellefeuille”, List of useful freeware, comp.archives.msdos.d, Usenet:
      PGP mail welcome (finger me for my key).
  7. (obsolete) To steal; to purloin.
  8. (transitive, obsolete) To execute, as any delicate work.

Synonyms

  • (to identify or point out): inform, grass up, snitch; See also Thesaurus:rat out
  • (sexual): fingerbang, fingerfuck

Translations

See also

  • artiodactyl
  • dactyl
  • dactylography
  • dactylology
  • fist
  • macrodactyly
  • perissodactyl
  • prestidigitation
  • pterodactyl

References

  • “finger, n., in the Oxford English Dictionary, Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Anagrams

  • fringe

Danish

Etymology 1

From Old Norse fingr, from Proto-Germanic *fingraz, from Proto-Indo-European *pénkʷrós.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /fenɡər/, [ˈfeŋˀɐ]

Noun

finger c (singular definite fingeren, plural indefinite fingre)

  1. finger
Inflection
Further reading
  • finger on the Danish Wikipedia.Wikipedia da

Etymology 2

See fingere (to simulate).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /fenɡɡeːr/, [ˈfeŋɡ̊eːˀɐ̯], [ˈfeŋɡ̊eɐ̯ˀ]

Verb

finger or fingér

  1. imperative of fingere

Middle English

Noun

finger

  1. Alternative form of fynger

Norwegian Bokmål

Etymology

From Old Norse fingr, from Proto-Germanic *fingraz, from Proto-Indo-European *pénkʷrós.

Noun

finger m (definite singular fingeren, indefinite plural fingre or fingrer, definite plural fingrene)

  1. (anatomy) a finger

Derived terms

Related terms

  • tommel

References

  • “finger” in The Bokmål Dictionary.

Norwegian Nynorsk

Etymology

From Old Norse fingr, from Proto-Germanic *fingraz, from Proto-Indo-European *pénkʷrós.

Noun

finger m (definite singular fingeren, indefinite plural fingrar, definite plural fingrane)

  1. (anatomy) a finger

Derived terms

Related terms

  • tommel

References

  • “finger” in The Nynorsk Dictionary.

Old English

Etymology

From Proto-West Germanic *fingr. Compare Old Frisian finger, Old Saxon fingar, Old High German fingar, Old Norse fingr, Gothic ???????????????????????? (figgrs).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈfin.ɡer/, [ˈfiŋ.ɡer]

Noun

finger m

  1. finger

Declension

Derived terms

Descendants

  • Middle English: fynger, finger, vinger, fyngir, fyngur, fyngyr, fiyngir, ffynger
    • English: finger
      • Sranan Tongo: finga
    • Scots: finger
    • Yola: vinger

Old Frisian

Etymology

From Proto-West Germanic *fingr

Noun

finger m

  1. finger

Inflection

Descendants

  • North Frisian:
    Föhr-Amrum: fanger
  • West Frisian: finger

Old Swedish

Etymology

From Old Norse fingr, from Proto-Germanic *fingraz.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈfiŋɡɛr/

Noun

finger m

  1. finger

Declension

or (with neuter gender)

Descendants

  • Swedish: finger

Spanish

Etymology

From English finger.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈfinɡeɾ/, [ˈfĩŋ.ɡeɾ]
  • Hyphenation: fin‧ger

Noun

finger m (plural fingeres)

  1. (food) finger
  2. (aviation, travel) jet bridge

Swedish

Etymology

From Old Swedish finger, from Old Norse fingr, from Proto-Germanic *fingraz, from Proto-Indo-European *pénkʷrós.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈfɪŋːɛr/

Noun

finger n or c

  1. (anatomy) a finger (the body part)

Declension

Usage notes

The neuter declension is much more common than the common declension.

Derived terms

See also

  • hand
  • knoge
  • nagel
  • tumme

References

  • finger in Svenska Akademiens ordlista (SAOL)

West Frisian

Etymology

From Old Frisian finger, from Proto-West Germanic *fingr.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈfɪŋər/

Noun

finger c (plural fingers, diminutive fingerke)

  1. finger

Further reading

  • “finger”, in Wurdboek fan de Fryske taal (in Dutch), 2011

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