feeling vs notion what difference

what is difference between feeling and notion

English

Etymology

From Middle English felynge, equivalent to feel +‎ -ing.

Pronunciation

  • (UK) IPA(key): /ˈfiːlɪŋ/
  • (US) IPA(key): /ˈfilɪŋ/
  • Rhymes: -iːlɪŋ

Adjective

feeling (comparative more feeling, superlative most feeling)

  1. Emotionally sensitive.
    Despite the rough voice, the coach is surprisingly feeling.
  2. Expressive of great sensibility; attended by, or evincing, sensibility.
    He made a feeling representation of his wrongs.

Translations

Noun

feeling (plural feelings)

  1. Sensation, particularly through the skin.
    The wool on my arm produced a strange feeling.
  2. Emotion; impression.
    The house gave me a feeling of dread.
  3. (always in the plural) Emotional state or well-being.
    You really hurt my feelings when you said that.
  4. (always in the plural) Emotional attraction or desire.
    Many people still have feelings for their first love.
  5. Intuition.
    He has no feeling for what he can say to somebody in such a fragile emotional condition.
    I’ve got a funny feeling that this isn’t going to work.
    • 1987, The Pogues – Fairytale of New York
      Got on a lucky one
      Came in eighteen to one
      I’ve got a feeling
      This year’s for me and you
  6. An opinion, an attitude.

Derived terms

Translations

Verb

feeling

  1. present participle of feel

Derived terms

  • feeling no pain

Anagrams

  • fine leg, fleeing, flingee

French

Etymology

Borrowed from English feeling.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /fi.liŋ/

Noun

feeling m (plural feelings)

  1. instinct, hunch

Anagrams

  • églefin

Italian

Etymology

Borrowed from English feeling.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈfi.linɡ/, /ˈfi.lin/

Noun

feeling m (invariable)

  1. an intense and immediate current of likability that is established between two people; feeling

References


Serbo-Croatian

Alternative forms

  • filing

Noun

feeling m

  1. feeling, hunch

Synonyms

  • osjećaj

Spanish

Etymology

Borrowed from English feeling.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈfilin/, [ˈfi.lĩn]

Noun

feeling m (plural feelings)

  1. feeling, hunch
  2. spark; attraction; feeling


English

Etymology

From Latin nōtiō (a becoming acquainted, a taking cognizance, an examination, an investigation, a conception, idea, notion), from nōscere (to know). Compare French notion. See know.

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /ˈnəʊʃən/
  • (General American) IPA(key): /ˈnoʊʃən/
  • Rhymes: -əʊʃən

Noun

notion (plural notions)

  1. Mental apprehension of whatever may be known, thought, or imagined; idea, concept.
    • What hath been generally agreed on, I content myself to assume under the notion of principles.
    • 1705-1715′, George Cheyne, The Philosophical Principles of Religion Natural and Revealed
      there are few that agree in their Notions about them:.
    • 1725, Isaac Watts, Logick, or The Right Use of Reason in the Enquiry After Truth With a Variety of Rules to Guard
      That notion of hunger, cold, sound, color, thought, wish, or fear which is in the mind, is called the “idea” of hunger, cold, etc.
    • Notion, again, signifies either the act of apprehending, signalizing, that is, the remarking or taking note of, the various notes, marks, or characters of an object which its qualities afford, or the result of that act.
  2. A sentiment; an opinion.
    • December 2, 1832, John Henry Newman, Wilfulness, the Sin of Saul
      A perverse will easily collects together a system of notions to justify itself in its obliquity.
  3. (obsolete) Sense; mind.
  4. (colloquial) An invention; an ingenious device; a knickknack.
  5. Any small article used in sewing and haberdashery, either for attachment to garments or as a tool, such as a button, zipper, or thimble.
  6. (colloquial) Inclination; intention; disposition.

Translations

See also

  • concept
  • conception
  • meaning

Further reading

  • notion in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.
  • notion in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.
  • notion on Wikipedia.Wikipedia

French

Etymology

Borrowed from Latin nōtiō, nōtiōnem.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /nɔ.sjɔ̃/

Noun

notion f (plural notions)

  1. notion

Further reading

  • “notion” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

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