feeling vs smell what difference

what is difference between feeling and smell

English

Etymology

From Middle English felynge, equivalent to feel +‎ -ing.

Pronunciation

  • (UK) IPA(key): /ˈfiːlɪŋ/
  • (US) IPA(key): /ˈfilɪŋ/
  • Rhymes: -iːlɪŋ

Adjective

feeling (comparative more feeling, superlative most feeling)

  1. Emotionally sensitive.
    Despite the rough voice, the coach is surprisingly feeling.
  2. Expressive of great sensibility; attended by, or evincing, sensibility.
    He made a feeling representation of his wrongs.

Translations

Noun

feeling (plural feelings)

  1. Sensation, particularly through the skin.
    The wool on my arm produced a strange feeling.
  2. Emotion; impression.
    The house gave me a feeling of dread.
  3. (always in the plural) Emotional state or well-being.
    You really hurt my feelings when you said that.
  4. (always in the plural) Emotional attraction or desire.
    Many people still have feelings for their first love.
  5. Intuition.
    He has no feeling for what he can say to somebody in such a fragile emotional condition.
    I’ve got a funny feeling that this isn’t going to work.
    • 1987, The Pogues – Fairytale of New York
      Got on a lucky one
      Came in eighteen to one
      I’ve got a feeling
      This year’s for me and you
  6. An opinion, an attitude.

Derived terms

Translations

Verb

feeling

  1. present participle of feel

Derived terms

  • feeling no pain

Anagrams

  • fine leg, fleeing, flingee

French

Etymology

Borrowed from English feeling.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /fi.liŋ/

Noun

feeling m (plural feelings)

  1. instinct, hunch

Anagrams

  • églefin

Italian

Etymology

Borrowed from English feeling.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈfi.linɡ/, /ˈfi.lin/

Noun

feeling m (invariable)

  1. an intense and immediate current of likability that is established between two people; feeling

References


Serbo-Croatian

Alternative forms

  • filing

Noun

feeling m

  1. feeling, hunch

Synonyms

  • osjećaj

Spanish

Etymology

Borrowed from English feeling.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈfilin/, [ˈfi.lĩn]

Noun

feeling m (plural feelings)

  1. feeling, hunch
  2. spark; attraction; feeling


English

Etymology

From Middle English smellen, smillen, smyllen, smullen, from Old English *smyllan, *smiellan (to smell, emit fumes), from Proto-West Germanic *smallijan (to glow, burn, smoulder), from Proto-Indo-European *smel- (to burn, smoke, smoulder; tar, pitch). The noun is from Middle English smel, smil, smul (smell, odour). Related to Saterland Frisian smeele (to smoulder), Middle Dutch smōlen (to burn, smoulder) (whence Dutch smeulen (to smoulder)), Middle Low German smölen (to be hazy, be dusty) (whence Low German smölen (smoulder)), Low German smullen (emit smoke), West Flemish smoel (stuffy, muggy, hazy), Danish smul (dust, powder), Lithuanian smilkyti (to incense, fumigate), Lithuanian smilkti (to smudge, smolder, fume, reek), Lithuanian smalkinti (to fume), Middle Irish smál, smól, smúal (fire, gleed, embers, ashes), Russian смола́ (smolá, resin, tar). Compare smoulder, smother.

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation, General American) enPR: smĕl, IPA(key): /smɛl/
  • Rhymes: -ɛl

Noun

smell (countable and uncountable, plural smells)

  1. A sensation, pleasant or unpleasant, detected by inhaling air (or, the case of water-breathing animals, water) carrying airborne molecules of a substance.
    • 1908, Kenneth Grahame, The Wind in the Willows
      The penetrating smell of cabbage reached the nose of Toad as he lay prostrate in his misery on the floor, and gave him the idea for a moment that perhaps life was not such a blank and desperate thing as he had imagined. But still he wailed, and kicked with his legs, and refused to be comforted. So the wise girl retired for the time, but, of course, a good deal of the smell of hot cabbage remained behind, as it will do, and Toad, between his sobs, sniffed and reflected, and gradually began to think new and inspiring thoughts: of chivalry, and poetry…
  2. (physiology) The sense that detects odours.
  3. A conclusion or intuition that a situation is wrong, more complex than it seems, or otherwise inappropriate.
    • 2018 Schroers, Carl (February 8, 2018), “Chapter 8”, in Wrestling with Time Lost, Lulu Press
      “I’m just saying, this has a bad smell to it.”

Usage notes

  • Adjectives often applied to “smell”: acrid, awful, bad, disgusting, fishy, foul, fragrant, fresh, funny, funky, good, great, horrible, metallic, musty, nasty, nice, odd, pervasive, penetrating, pleasant, powerful, pungent, putrid, rancid, rank, rotten, sour, spoilt, salty, strange, stinky, strong, sweet, terrible, unpleasant.

Synonyms

  • (sensation): see Thesaurus:smell
    • (pleasant): aroma, fragrance, odor/odour, scent; see also Thesaurus:aroma
    • (unpleasant): niff (informal), pong (informal), reek, stench, stink; see also Thesaurus:stench
  • (sense): olfaction (in technical use), sense of smell

Hyponyms

Derived terms

Translations

Verb

smell (third-person singular simple present smells, present participle smelling, simple past and past participle smelled or smelt)

  1. (transitive) To sense a smell or smells.
    Synonyms: detect, sense
  2. (intransitive, copulative) Followed by like or of if descriptive: to have a particular smell, whether good or bad.
    Synonyms: (informal) pong, reek, stink, (informal; these words refer to unpleasant smells) whiff
  3. (intransitive, without a modifier) To smell bad; to stink.
  4. (intransitive, figuratively) To have a particular tincture or smack of any quality; to savour.
    • 1649, John Milton, Eikonoklastes
      Praises in an enemy are superfluous, or smell of craft.
  5. (obsolete) To exercise sagacity.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Shakespeare to this entry?)
  6. To detect or perceive; often with out.
  7. (obsolete) To give heed to.
    • 1552, Hugh Latimer, the first sermon upon the Lord’s Prayer
      From that time forward I began to smell the Word of God, and forsook the school doctors.
  8. (transitive) To smell off; to have a smell of

Usage notes

  • The sense “to smell bad, stink” is considered by some to be an incorrect (euphemistic) substitute for stink.

Derived terms

Translations

See also

  • anosmia
  • sense

References

  • smell in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.
  • smell in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.

Anagrams

  • Mells, Mlles, mells

Icelandic

Verb

smell (strong)

  1. first-person singular present indicative of smella
  2. second-person singular imperative of smella

Verb

smell (weak)

  1. second-person singular imperative of smella

Norwegian Bokmål

Etymology

From the verb smelle.

Noun

smell n (definite singular smellet, indefinite plural smell, definite plural smella or smellene)
smell m (definite singular smellen, indefinite plural smell or smeller, definite plural smellene)

  1. a bang (sudden loud noise)

References

  • “smell” in The Bokmål Dictionary.

Norwegian Nynorsk

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /smɛlː/

Etymology 1

From the verb smelle.

Noun

smell n (definite singular smellet, indefinite plural smell, definite plural smella)
smell m (definite singular smellen, indefinite plural smellar, definite plural smellane)

  1. a bang (sudden loud noise)

Etymology 2

Noun

smell m (definite singular smellen, indefinite plural smellar, definite plural smellane)

  1. a knock, an impact

References

  • “smell” in The Nynorsk Dictionary.

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