feeling vs spirit what difference

what is difference between feeling and spirit

English

Etymology

From Middle English felynge, equivalent to feel +‎ -ing.

Pronunciation

  • (UK) IPA(key): /ˈfiːlɪŋ/
  • (US) IPA(key): /ˈfilɪŋ/
  • Rhymes: -iːlɪŋ

Adjective

feeling (comparative more feeling, superlative most feeling)

  1. Emotionally sensitive.
    Despite the rough voice, the coach is surprisingly feeling.
  2. Expressive of great sensibility; attended by, or evincing, sensibility.
    He made a feeling representation of his wrongs.

Translations

Noun

feeling (plural feelings)

  1. Sensation, particularly through the skin.
    The wool on my arm produced a strange feeling.
  2. Emotion; impression.
    The house gave me a feeling of dread.
  3. (always in the plural) Emotional state or well-being.
    You really hurt my feelings when you said that.
  4. (always in the plural) Emotional attraction or desire.
    Many people still have feelings for their first love.
  5. Intuition.
    He has no feeling for what he can say to somebody in such a fragile emotional condition.
    I’ve got a funny feeling that this isn’t going to work.
    • 1987, The Pogues – Fairytale of New York
      Got on a lucky one
      Came in eighteen to one
      I’ve got a feeling
      This year’s for me and you
  6. An opinion, an attitude.

Derived terms

Translations

Verb

feeling

  1. present participle of feel

Derived terms

  • feeling no pain

Anagrams

  • fine leg, fleeing, flingee

French

Etymology

Borrowed from English feeling.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /fi.liŋ/

Noun

feeling m (plural feelings)

  1. instinct, hunch

Anagrams

  • églefin

Italian

Etymology

Borrowed from English feeling.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈfi.linɡ/, /ˈfi.lin/

Noun

feeling m (invariable)

  1. an intense and immediate current of likability that is established between two people; feeling

References


Serbo-Croatian

Alternative forms

  • filing

Noun

feeling m

  1. feeling, hunch

Synonyms

  • osjećaj

Spanish

Etymology

Borrowed from English feeling.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈfilin/, [ˈfi.lĩn]

Noun

feeling m (plural feelings)

  1. feeling, hunch
  2. spark; attraction; feeling


English

Etymology

From Middle English spirit, from Old French espirit (spirit), from Latin spīritus (breath; spirit), from Proto-Indo-European *(s)peys- (to blow, breathe). Compare inspire, respire, transpire, all ultimately from Latin spīrō (I breathe, blow, respire). Displaced native Middle English gast (spirit) (from Old English gāst (spirit, ghost)), whence modern English ghost. Doublet of sprite.

Pronunciation

  • (UK) IPA(key): /ˈspɪɹɪt/
  • (US) IPA(key): /ˈspiɹɪt/, /ˈspɪɹɪt/
  • Rhymes: -ɪɹɪt
  • Hyphenation: spir‧it

Noun

spirit (countable and uncountable, plural spirits)

  1. The soul of a person or other creature. What moves through experience into self-definition as souls purpose.
  2. A supernatural being, often but not exclusively without physical form; ghost, fairy, angel.
    A wandering spirit haunts the island.
    • 1693, John Locke, Some Thoughts Concerning Education
      Whilst young, preserve his tender mind from all impressions and notions of spirits and goblins [] in the dark.
  3. Enthusiasm.
  4. The manner or style of something.
  5. (usually in the plural) A volatile liquid, such as alcohol. The plural form spirits is a generic term for distilled alcoholic beverages.
  6. Energy; ardour.
    • 1655, Thomas Fuller, The Church History of Britain
      “Write it then, quickly,” replied Bede; and summoning all his spirits together, like the last blaze of a candle going out, he indited it, and expired.
  7. One who is vivacious or lively; one who evinces great activity or peculiar characteristics of mind or temper.
    a ruling spirit; a schismatic spirit
    • 1697, John Dryden, Aeneid
      Such spirits as he desired to please, such would I choose for my judges.
  8. (often in the plural) Temper or disposition of mind; mental condition or disposition; intellectual or moral state.
    to be cheerful, or in good spirits; to be down-hearted, or in bad spirits
    • 1667, Robert South, Sermon VII
      God has [] made a spirit of building succeed a spirit of pulling down.
  9. (obsolete) Air set in motion by breathing; breath; hence, sometimes, life itself.
  10. (obsolete) A rough breathing; an aspirate, such as the letter h; also, a mark denoting aspiration.
    • 1640, Ben Jonson, The English Grammar
      Be it a letter or spirit, we have great use of it.
  11. Intent; real meaning; opposed to the letter, or formal statement.
    the spirit of an enterprise, or of a document
  12. (alchemy, obsolete) Any of the four substances: sulphur, sal ammoniac, quicksilver, and arsenic (or, according to some, orpiment).
    • the foure spirites and the bodyes seven
  13. (dyeing) Stannic chloride.

Derived terms

Pages starting with “spirit”.

Translations

See also

  • ghost
  • soul

Verb

spirit (third-person singular simple present spirits, present participle spiriting, simple past and past participle spirited)

  1. To carry off, especially in haste, secrecy, or mystery.
    • 1835, Nathaniel Parker Willis, Pencillings by the Way:
      I felt as if I had been spirited into some castle of felicity.
  2. Sometimes followed by up: to animate with vigour; to excite; to encourage; to inspirit.

Derived terms

  • spirit away
  • spirit off

Anagrams

  • Tripis, pitris

Indonesian

Etymology

From Dutch spirit, from English spirit, from Middle English spirit, from Old French espirit (spirit), from Latin spīritus (breath; spirit), from Proto-Indo-European *(s)peys- (to blow, breathe). Doublet of spiritus.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ˈspirɪt̪̚]
  • Hyphenation: spi‧rit

Noun

spirit (plural spirit-spirit, first-person possessive spiritku, second-person possessive spiritmu, third-person possessive spiritnya)

  1. spirit:
    1. the soul of a person or other creature. What moves through experience into self-definition as souls purpose.
      Synonyms: arwah, atma, jiwa, hidup, kehidupan, nyawa, roh, sukma
    2. a supernatural being, often but not exclusively without physical form; ghost, fairy, angel.
      Synonyms: arwah, roh
    3. (figuratively) enthusiasm, energy; ardour.
      Synonyms: roh, semangat, spirit

Related terms

Further reading

  • “spirit” in Kamus Besar Bahasa Indonesia (KBBI) Daring, Jakarta: Badan Pengembangan dan Pembinaan Bahasa, Kementerian Pendidikan dan Kebudayaan Republik Indonesia, 2016.

Romanian

Etymology

Borrowed from Latin spiritus. Compare also spiriduș.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈspirit/

Noun

spirit n (plural spirite)

  1. spirit, ghost
  2. essence, psyche
  3. wit, genius
  4. manner, style

Declension

Synonyms

  • (spirit, ghost): duh

Related terms

  • spiriduș

See also

  • nălucă, stafie, spectru, apariție, fantomă

Tok Pisin

Etymology

English spirit

Noun

spirit

  1. spirit (physical form of God)


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