fell vs fly what difference

what is difference between fell and fly

English

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /fɛl/
  • Rhymes: -ɛl

Etymology 1

From Middle English fellen, from Old English fellan, fiellan (to cause to fall, strike down, fell, cut down, throw down, defeat, destroy, kill, tumble, cause to stumble), from Proto-Germanic *fallijaną (to fell, to cause to fall), causative of Proto-Germanic *fallaną (to fall), from Proto-Indo-European *(s)pōl- (to fall). Cognate with Dutch vellen (to fell, cut down), German fällen (to fell), Norwegian felle (to fell).

Verb

fell (third-person singular simple present fells, present participle felling, simple past and past participle felled)

  1. (transitive) To make something fall; especially to chop down a tree.
  2. (transitive) To strike down, kill, destroy.
    • 2016 January 17, “What Weiner Reveals About Huma Abedin,” Vanity Fair (retrieved 21 January 2016):
      This Sunday marks the debut of Weiner, a documentary that follows former congressman Anthony Weiner in his attempt to overcome a sexting scandal and run for mayor of New York City—only to be felled, somewhat inexplicably, by another sexting scandal.
  3. (sewing) To stitch down a protruding flap of fabric, as a seam allowance, or pleat.
    • 2006, Colette Wolff, The Art of Manipulating Fabric, page 296:
      To fell seam allowances, catch the lining underneath before emerging 1/4″ (6mm) ahead, and 1/8″ (3mm) to 1/4″ (6mm) into the seam allowance.
Translations

Noun

fell (plural fells)

  1. A cutting-down of timber.
  2. The stitching down of a fold of cloth; specifically, the portion of a kilt, from the waist to the seat, where the pleats are stitched down.
  3. (textiles) The end of a web, formed by the last thread of the weft.
Translations

Etymology 2

From Middle English fell, fel, vel, from Old English fel, fell (hide, skin, pelt), from Proto-Germanic *fellą (compare West Frisian fel, Dutch vel, German Fell), from Proto-Indo-European *pél-no- (skin, animal hide) (compare Latin pellis (skin), Lithuanian plėnė (skin), Russian плена́ (plená, pelt), Albanian plah (to cover), Ancient Greek πέλλᾱς (péllās, skin)). Related to film and pell.

Noun

fell (plural fells)

  1. An animal skin, hide, pelt.
    • c. 1599 Shakespeare: As You Like It: Act 3 Sc.3 L. 35
      Why, we are still handling our ewes, and their fells, you know, are greasy.
  2. Human skin (now only as a metaphorical use of previous sense).
    • c. 1390, William Langland, Piers Plowman, I:
      For he is fader of feith · fourmed ȝow alle / Bothe with fel and with face.
Translations

Etymology 3

From Old Norse fell, fjall (rock, mountain), compare Norwegian Bokmål fjell ‘mountain’, from Proto-Germanic *felzą, *fel(e)zaz, *falisaz (compare German Felsen ‘boulder, cliff’, Middle Low German vels ‘hill, mountain’), from Proto-Indo-European *pelso; compare Irish aill (boulder, cliff), Ancient Greek πέλλα (pélla, stone), Pashto پرښه(parṣ̌a, rock, rocky ledge), Sanskrit पाषाण (pāşāņá, stone). Doublet of fjeld.

Noun

fell (plural fells)

  1. (archaic outside Britain) A rocky ridge or chain of mountains.
    • 1937 J.R.R. Tolkien, The Hobbit
      The dwarves of yore made mighty spells, / While hammers fell like ringing bells, / In places deep, where dark things sleep, / In hollow halls beneath the fells.
    • 1971 Catherine Cookson, The Dwelling Place
      She didn’t know at first why she stepped off the road and climbed the bank on to the fells; it wasn’t until she found herself skirting a disused quarry that she realised where she was making for, and when she reached the place she stood and gazed at it. It was a hollow within an outcrop of rock, not large enough to call a cave but deep enough to shelter eight people from the rain, and with room to spare.
  2. (archaic outside Britain) A wild field or upland moor.
    • 1612, Michael Drayton, Poly-Olbion song 11 p. 174[5]:
      As over Holt and Heath, as thorough Frith and Fell;
Derived terms
  • Low Fell
Translations

Etymology 4

From Middle English fel, fell (strong, fierce, terrible, cruel, angry), from Old English *fel, *felo, *fæle (cruel, savage, fierce) (only in compounds, wælfel (bloodthirsty), ealfelo (evil, baleful), ælfæle (very dire), etc.), from Proto-Germanic *faluz (wicked, cruel, terrifying), from Proto-Indo-European *pol- (to pour, flow, swim, fly). Cognate with Old Frisian fal (cruel), Middle Dutch fel (wrathful, cruel, bad, base), German Low German fell (rash, swift), Danish fæl (disgusting, hideous, ghastly, grim), Middle High German vālant (imp). See felon.

Adjective

fell (comparative feller, superlative fellest)

  1. Of a strong and cruel nature; eager and unsparing; grim; fierce; ruthless; savage.
    • c. 1591, William Shakespeare, Henry VI, Part 3, Act II scene vi[6]:
      [] While we devise fell tortures for thy faults.
    • 1663, Hudibras, by Samuel Butler, part 1, canto 2
      And many a serpent of fell kind, / With wings before, and stings behind
  2. (Britain dialectal, Scotland) Strong and fiery; biting; keen; sharp; pungent
  3. (Britain dialectal, Scotland) Very large; huge.
  4. (obsolete) Eager; earnest; intent.
    • I am so fell to my business.

Translations

Adverb

fell (comparative more fell, superlative most fell)

  1. Sharply; fiercely.
Derived terms
  • fellness

Etymology 5

Perhaps from Latin fel (gall, poison, bitterness), or more probably from the adjective above.

Noun

fell (uncountable)

  1. (obsolete, rare) Anger; gall; melancholy.

Etymology 6

Noun

fell

  1. (mining) The finer portions of ore, which go through the meshes when the ore is sorted by sifting.

Etymology 7

Verb

fell

  1. simple past tense of fall
  2. (now colloquial) past participle of fall

Further reading

  • Fell (disambiguation) on Wikipedia.Wikipedia
  • Fell in the Encyclopædia Britannica (11th edition, 1911)

Albanian

Etymology

From Proto-Albanian *spesla, metathesized form of *spelsa, from Proto-Indo-European *pels (rock, boulder), variant of *spel- (to cleave, break). Compare Latin hydronym Pelso, Latin Palatium, Pashto پرښه(parša, rock, rocky ledge), Ancient Greek πέλλα (pélla, stone), German Felsen (boulder, cliff). Mostly dialectal, used in Gheg Albanian.

Adverb

fell

  1. deep, shallow
Derived terms
  • fellë
Related terms
  • fyell

Icelandic

Etymology

Old Norse fjall (mountain)

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /fɛtl/
  • Rhymes: -ɛtl

Noun

fell n (genitive singular fells, nominative plural fell)

  1. isolated hill, isolated mountain

Declension


Norwegian Bokmål

Verb

fell

  1. imperative of felle

Norwegian Nynorsk

Etymology 1

Verb

fell

  1. present of falle

Etymology 2

Verb

fell

  1. imperative of fella

Old English

Alternative forms

  • fel

Etymology

From Proto-West Germanic *fell, whence also Old High German vel.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /fell/, [feɫ]

Noun

fell n

  1. fell
  2. skin

Old Norse

Verb

fell

  1. inflection of falla:
    1. first-person singular present/past active indicative
    2. third-person singular past active indicative


English

Pronunciation

  • enPR: flī, IPA(key): /flaɪ/
  • Rhymes: -aɪ

Etymology 1

From Middle English flye, flie, from Old English flȳġe, flēoge (a fly), from Proto-Germanic *fleugǭ (a fly), from Proto-Indo-European *plewk- (to fly). Cognate with Scots flee, Saterland Frisian Fljooge, Dutch vlieg, German Low German Fleeg, German Fliege, Danish flue, Norwegian Bokmål flue, Norwegian Nynorsk fluge, Swedish fluga, Icelandic fluga.

Noun

fly (plural flies)

  1. (zoology) Any insect of the order Diptera; characterized by having two wings (except for some wingless species), also called true flies.
  2. (non-technical) Especially, any of the insects of the family Muscidae, such as the common housefly (other families of Diptera include mosquitoes and midges).
  3. Any similar, but unrelated insect such as dragonfly or butterfly.
  4. (fishing) A lightweight fishing lure resembling an insect.
  5. (weightlifting) A chest exercise performed by moving extended arms from the sides to in front of the chest. (also flye)
  6. (obsolete) A witch’s familiar.
    • a trifling fly, none of your great familiars
  7. (obsolete) A parasite.
  8. (swimming) The butterfly stroke (plural is normally flys)
  9. (preceded by definite article) A simple dance in which the hands are shaken in the air, popular in the 1960s.
Hyponyms
Derived terms
Translations

Further reading

  • fly on Wikipedia.Wikipedia
  • Muscidae on Wikimedia Commons.Wikimedia Commons

Etymology 2

From Middle English flien, from Old English flēogan, from Proto-Germanic *fleuganą (compare Saterland Frisian fljooge, Dutch vliegen, Low German flegen, German fliegen, Danish flyve, Norwegian Nynorsk flyga), from Proto-Indo-European *plewk- (*plew-k-, to fly) (compare Lithuanian plaũkti ‘to swim’), enlargement of *plew- (flow). More at flee and flow.

Verb

fly (third-person singular simple present flies, present participle flying, simple past flew, past participle flown)

  1. (intransitive) To travel through the air, another gas, or a vacuum, without being in contact with a grounded surface.
    • 1909, Gilbert Keith Chesterton, Orthodoxy
      Angels can fly because they take themselves lightly.
  2. (transitive, intransitive, archaic, poetic) To flee, to escape (from).
    • Sleep flies the wretch.
    • 1954, J. R. R. Tolkien, The Fellowship of the Ring
      He staggered and fell, grasped vainly at the stone, and slid into the abyss. “Fly, you fools!” he cried, and was gone.
  3. (transitive, ergative) To cause to fly (travel or float in the air): to transport via air or the like.
    • The brave black flag I fly.
  4. (intransitive) To travel or proceed very fast; to hasten.
    He flew down the hill on his bicycle.
    It’s five o’clock already. Doesn’t time fly!
    • 1645, John Milton, On Time
      Fly, envious Time, till thou run out thy race.
    • 1870, William Cullen Bryant (translator), The Iliad (originally by Homer)
      The dark waves murmured as the ship flew on.
  5. To move suddenly, or with violence; to do an act suddenly or swiftly.
  6. (intransitive) To proceed with great success.
    His career is really flying at the moment.
    One moment the company was flying high, the next it was on its knees.
  7. (intransitive, colloquial, of a proposal, project or idea) To be accepted, come about or work out.
  8. (transitive, ergative) To display (a flag) on a flagpole.
  9. To hunt with a hawk.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Francis Bacon to this entry?)
Synonyms
  • (travel through air): soar, hover, wing, skim, glide, ascend, rise, float, aviate
  • (flee): escape, flee, abscond; see also Thesaurus:flee
  • (travel very fast): dart, flit; see also Thesaurus:move quickly
  • (do an act suddenly): hurry, zoom; see also Thesaurus:rush
Antonyms
  • (travel through air): walk
  • (flee): remain, stay
  • (travel very fast): see also Thesaurus:move slowly
Hyponyms
Derived terms
Related terms
  • fly agaric
  • flight
Translations

Noun

fly (plural flys or flies)

  1. (obsolete) The action of flying; flight.
  2. An act of flying.
  3. (baseball) A fly ball.
  4. (now historical) A type of small, fast carriage (sometimes pluralised flys).
    • 1897, Bram Stoker, Dracula, Folio Society 2008, page 124:
      As we left the house in my fly, which had been waiting, Van Helsing said:— ‘Tonight I can sleep in peace […].’
    • 1924, Ford Madox Ford, Some Do Not…, Penguin 2012 (Parade’s End), page 54:
      And, driving back in the fly, Macmaster said to himself that you couldn’t call Mrs. Duchemin ordinary, at least.
  5. A piece of canvas that covers the opening at the front of a tent.
  6. (often plural) A strip of material (sometimes hiding zippers or buttons) at the front of a pair of trousers, pants, underpants, bootees, etc.
    Ha-ha! Your flies are undone!
    • February 2014 Y-Front Fly
      Y-Front is a registered trademark for a special front fly turned upside down to form a Y owned by Jockey® International. The first Y-Front® brief was created by Jockey® more than 70 years ago.
    • June 2014 The Hole In Men’s Underwear: Name And Purpose
      Briefs were given an opening in the front. The point of this opening (the ‘fly’) was to make it easier to pee with clothes on
  7. The free edge of a flag.
  8. The horizontal length of a flag.
  9. (weightlifting) An exercise that involves wide opening and closing of the arms perpendicular to the shoulders.
  10. The part of a vane pointing the direction from which the wind blows.
  11. (nautical) That part of a compass on which the points are marked; the compass card.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Totten to this entry?)
  12. Two or more vanes set on a revolving axis, to act as a fanner, or to equalize or impede the motion of machinery by the resistance of the air, as in the striking part of a clock.
  13. Short for flywheel.
  14. (historical) A light horse-drawn carriage that can be hired for transportation.
    • 1859, Wilkie Collins, The Woman in White:
      Can I get a fly, or a carriage of any kind? Is it too late?
      I dismissed the fly a mile distant from the park, and getting my directions from the driver, proceeded by myself to the house.
    • 1861, Henry Mayhew and William Tuckniss, London Labour and the London Poor: A Cyclopœdia of the Condition and Earnings of Those that Will Work, Those that Cannot Work, and Those that Will Not Work, Volume 3, p. 359:
      A glass coach, it may be as well to observe, is a carriage and pair hired by the day, and a fly a one-horse carriage hired in a similar manner.
  15. In a knitting machine, the piece hinged to the needle, which holds the engaged loop in position while the needle is penetrating another loop; a latch.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Knight to this entry?)
  16. The pair of arms revolving around the bobbin, in a spinning wheel or spinning frame, to twist the yarn.
  17. (weaving) A shuttle driven through the shed by a blow or jerk.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Knight to this entry?)
  18. (printing, historical) The person who took the printed sheets from the press.
  19. (printing, historical) A vibrating frame with fingers, attached to a power printing press for doing the same work.
  20. One of the upper screens of a stage in a theatre.
  21. (cotton manufacture) waste cotton
Derived terms
Translations

Verb

fly (third-person singular simple present flies, present participle flying, simple past and past participle flied)

  1. (intransitive, baseball) To hit a fly ball; to hit a fly ball that is caught for an out. Compare ground (verb) and line (verb).
    Jones flied to right in his last at-bat.
Translations

Etymology 3

Origin uncertain; probably from the verb or noun.

Adjective

fly (comparative flier, superlative fliest)

  1. (slang, dated) Quick-witted, alert, mentally sharp.
  2. (slang) Well dressed, smart in appearance; in style, cool.
  3. (slang) Beautiful; displaying physical beauty.
Translations

Etymology 4

Related to German Flügel (a wing), Dutch vleugel (a wing), Swedish flygel (a wing).

Noun

fly (plural flies)

  1. (rural, Scotland, Northern England) A wing.

References

  • fly at OneLook Dictionary Search
  • The Dictionary of the Scots Language

Danish

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ˈflyˀ]

Etymology 1

An abbreviation of flyvemaskine, after Norwegian fly and Swedish flyg.

Noun

fly n (singular definite flyet, plural indefinite fly)

  1. airplane
Inflection
Synonyms
  • flyvemaskine c
  • flyver c

Etymology 2

From Old Norse flýja (to flee), from Proto-Germanic *fleuhaną, cognate with English flee, German fliehen, Dutch vlieden.

Verb

fly (present flyr or flyer, past tense flyede, past participle flyet)

  1. (archaic) to flee
  2. (archaic) to shun
Inflection

Etymology 3

From Middle Low German vlī(g)en (to stack, sort out), cognate with Dutch vlijen (to place), from Proto-Germanic *flīhan, of unknown ultimate origin; possibly related to the root of *flaihijan (to be sly, to flatter), though the semantic gap is wide.

Verb

fly (present flyr or flyer, past tense flyede, past participle flyet)

  1. (archaic) to hand, give
Inflection

References


Norwegian Bokmål

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /flyː/

Etymology 1

Short form of flygemaskin

Noun

fly n (definite singular flyet, indefinite plural fly, definite plural flya or flyene)

  1. plane, aeroplane (UK), airplane (US), aircraft
Derived terms

Etymology 2

From Old Norse fljúga

Alternative forms

  • flyge

Verb

fly (imperative fly, present tense flyr, simple past fløy, past participle flydd or fløyet)

  1. to fly
Derived terms
  • glidefly

References

  • “fly” in The Bokmål Dictionary.

Norwegian Nynorsk

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /flyː/ (example of pronunciation)

Etymology 1

Clipping of flygemaskin (flying machine).

Noun

fly n (definite singular flyet, indefinite plural fly, definite plural flya)

  1. plane, aeroplane (UK), airplane (US), aircraft
    Skunda deg, elles misser du flyet ditt!

    Hurry up, or you’ll miss your plane!
Derived terms

Etymology 2

From Old Norse fljúga, from Proto-Germanic *fleuganą.

Alternative forms

  • fljuga, fljuge, flyga, flyge

Verb

fly (present tense flyr or flyg, past tense flaug, supine floge, past participle flogen, present participle flygande, imperative fly or flyg)

  1. (intransitive) to fly (to travel through air, another gas or a vacuum, without being in contact with a grounded surface)
  2. (transitive, ergative) to cause to fly: to transport via air or the like
  3. (intransitive) to run, move fast
  4. (intransitive, chiefly about farm animals) to be in heat, rutting
Derived terms
Related terms
  • fløygje

Adjective

fly (masculine and feminine fly, neuter flytt, definite singular and plural flye, comparative flyare, indefinite superlative flyast, definite superlative flyaste)

  1. very steep

Noun

fly n (definite singular flyet, indefinite plural fly, definite plural flya)

  1. a very steep cliff

Etymology 3

From Old Norse flýja, from Proto-Germanic *fleuhaną.

Verb

fly (present tense flyr, past tense flydde, past participle flydd/flytt, passive infinitive flyast, present participle flyande, imperative fly)

  1. (intransitive) to escape; flee; run away
    Synonym: flykte
  2. (transitive) to escape from

Etymology 4

Clipping of flygande (flying), present participle of fly.

Adverb

fly

  1. (colloquial) Used as an intensifier for the word forbanna
    Han vart fly forbanna.

Etymology 5

Confer with flye n (flying insect) and English fly.

Noun

fly f (definite singular flya, indefinite plural flyer, definite plural flyene)

  1. small (flying) insect
  2. (fishing) bait

Etymology 6

Noun

fly f (definite singular flya, indefinite plural flyer, definite plural flyene)

  1. specks
    Synonyms: rusk, grann

Etymology 7

Noun

fly f (definite singular flya, indefinite plural flyer, definite plural flyene)

  1. mountain plateau
    Synonyms: vidde, fjellvidde

Etymology 8

Of uncertain origin, though may be related to flyta (to float).

Noun

fly n (definite singular flyet, indefinite plural fly, definite plural flya)

  1. sump

Etymology 9

Related to, or possibly a doublet of flø, from Old Norse flór.

Adjective

fly (masculine and feminine fly, neuter flytt, definite singular and plural flye, comparative flyare, indefinite superlative flyast, definite superlative flyaste)

  1. tepid

References

  • “fly” in The Nynorsk Dictionary.
  • Ivar Aasen (1850), “fly”, in Ordbog over det norske Folkesprog, Oslo: Samlaget, published 2000

Anagrams

  • fyl

Scots

Adjective

fly

  1. (slang, chiefly Doric) sneaky

Swedish

Etymology

From Old Swedish flȳia, flȳa, from Old Norse flýja, from Proto-Germanic *fleuhaną.

Pronunciation

Verb

fly (present flyr, preterite flydde, supine flytt, imperative fly)

  1. to flee, to run away, to escape
  2. to pass, to go by (of time)
    • 1964, Gunnel Vallquist, title of the new Swedish translation of Proust’s À la recherche du temps perdu
      På spaning efter den tid som flytt

      In Search of Lost Time
    • 1965, Sven-Ingvars, Börja om från början
      Varför ska man sörja tider som har flytt?

      Why should one feel sorry for times that have passed?

Conjugation

Related terms

  • flykt
  • flykting

Westrobothnian

Etymology 3

From Middle Low German vlī(g)en (to stack, sort out), cognate with Dutch vlijen (to place), from Proto-Germanic *flīhan, of unknown ultimate origin; possibly related to the root of *flaihijan (to be sly, to flatter), though the semantic gap is wide.

Verb

fly

  1. to send, to hand
    fly me sɑksa

    hand me the scissors


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