fell vs vicious what difference

what is difference between fell and vicious

English

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /fɛl/
  • Rhymes: -ɛl

Etymology 1

From Middle English fellen, from Old English fellan, fiellan (to cause to fall, strike down, fell, cut down, throw down, defeat, destroy, kill, tumble, cause to stumble), from Proto-Germanic *fallijaną (to fell, to cause to fall), causative of Proto-Germanic *fallaną (to fall), from Proto-Indo-European *(s)pōl- (to fall). Cognate with Dutch vellen (to fell, cut down), German fällen (to fell), Norwegian felle (to fell).

Verb

fell (third-person singular simple present fells, present participle felling, simple past and past participle felled)

  1. (transitive) To make something fall; especially to chop down a tree.
  2. (transitive) To strike down, kill, destroy.
    • 2016 January 17, “What Weiner Reveals About Huma Abedin,” Vanity Fair (retrieved 21 January 2016):
      This Sunday marks the debut of Weiner, a documentary that follows former congressman Anthony Weiner in his attempt to overcome a sexting scandal and run for mayor of New York City—only to be felled, somewhat inexplicably, by another sexting scandal.
  3. (sewing) To stitch down a protruding flap of fabric, as a seam allowance, or pleat.
    • 2006, Colette Wolff, The Art of Manipulating Fabric, page 296:
      To fell seam allowances, catch the lining underneath before emerging 1/4″ (6mm) ahead, and 1/8″ (3mm) to 1/4″ (6mm) into the seam allowance.
Translations

Noun

fell (plural fells)

  1. A cutting-down of timber.
  2. The stitching down of a fold of cloth; specifically, the portion of a kilt, from the waist to the seat, where the pleats are stitched down.
  3. (textiles) The end of a web, formed by the last thread of the weft.
Translations

Etymology 2

From Middle English fell, fel, vel, from Old English fel, fell (hide, skin, pelt), from Proto-Germanic *fellą (compare West Frisian fel, Dutch vel, German Fell), from Proto-Indo-European *pél-no- (skin, animal hide) (compare Latin pellis (skin), Lithuanian plėnė (skin), Russian плена́ (plená, pelt), Albanian plah (to cover), Ancient Greek πέλλᾱς (péllās, skin)). Related to film and pell.

Noun

fell (plural fells)

  1. An animal skin, hide, pelt.
    • c. 1599 Shakespeare: As You Like It: Act 3 Sc.3 L. 35
      Why, we are still handling our ewes, and their fells, you know, are greasy.
  2. Human skin (now only as a metaphorical use of previous sense).
    • c. 1390, William Langland, Piers Plowman, I:
      For he is fader of feith · fourmed ȝow alle / Bothe with fel and with face.
Translations

Etymology 3

From Old Norse fell, fjall (rock, mountain), compare Norwegian Bokmål fjell ‘mountain’, from Proto-Germanic *felzą, *fel(e)zaz, *falisaz (compare German Felsen ‘boulder, cliff’, Middle Low German vels ‘hill, mountain’), from Proto-Indo-European *pelso; compare Irish aill (boulder, cliff), Ancient Greek πέλλα (pélla, stone), Pashto پرښه(parṣ̌a, rock, rocky ledge), Sanskrit पाषाण (pāşāņá, stone). Doublet of fjeld.

Noun

fell (plural fells)

  1. (archaic outside Britain) A rocky ridge or chain of mountains.
    • 1937 J.R.R. Tolkien, The Hobbit
      The dwarves of yore made mighty spells, / While hammers fell like ringing bells, / In places deep, where dark things sleep, / In hollow halls beneath the fells.
    • 1971 Catherine Cookson, The Dwelling Place
      She didn’t know at first why she stepped off the road and climbed the bank on to the fells; it wasn’t until she found herself skirting a disused quarry that she realised where she was making for, and when she reached the place she stood and gazed at it. It was a hollow within an outcrop of rock, not large enough to call a cave but deep enough to shelter eight people from the rain, and with room to spare.
  2. (archaic outside Britain) A wild field or upland moor.
    • 1612, Michael Drayton, Poly-Olbion song 11 p. 174[5]:
      As over Holt and Heath, as thorough Frith and Fell;
Derived terms
  • Low Fell
Translations

Etymology 4

From Middle English fel, fell (strong, fierce, terrible, cruel, angry), from Old English *fel, *felo, *fæle (cruel, savage, fierce) (only in compounds, wælfel (bloodthirsty), ealfelo (evil, baleful), ælfæle (very dire), etc.), from Proto-Germanic *faluz (wicked, cruel, terrifying), from Proto-Indo-European *pol- (to pour, flow, swim, fly). Cognate with Old Frisian fal (cruel), Middle Dutch fel (wrathful, cruel, bad, base), German Low German fell (rash, swift), Danish fæl (disgusting, hideous, ghastly, grim), Middle High German vālant (imp). See felon.

Adjective

fell (comparative feller, superlative fellest)

  1. Of a strong and cruel nature; eager and unsparing; grim; fierce; ruthless; savage.
    • c. 1591, William Shakespeare, Henry VI, Part 3, Act II scene vi[6]:
      [] While we devise fell tortures for thy faults.
    • 1663, Hudibras, by Samuel Butler, part 1, canto 2
      And many a serpent of fell kind, / With wings before, and stings behind
  2. (Britain dialectal, Scotland) Strong and fiery; biting; keen; sharp; pungent
  3. (Britain dialectal, Scotland) Very large; huge.
  4. (obsolete) Eager; earnest; intent.
    • I am so fell to my business.

Translations

Adverb

fell (comparative more fell, superlative most fell)

  1. Sharply; fiercely.
Derived terms
  • fellness

Etymology 5

Perhaps from Latin fel (gall, poison, bitterness), or more probably from the adjective above.

Noun

fell (uncountable)

  1. (obsolete, rare) Anger; gall; melancholy.

Etymology 6

Noun

fell

  1. (mining) The finer portions of ore, which go through the meshes when the ore is sorted by sifting.

Etymology 7

Verb

fell

  1. simple past tense of fall
  2. (now colloquial) past participle of fall

Further reading

  • Fell (disambiguation) on Wikipedia.Wikipedia
  • Fell in the Encyclopædia Britannica (11th edition, 1911)

Albanian

Etymology

From Proto-Albanian *spesla, metathesized form of *spelsa, from Proto-Indo-European *pels (rock, boulder), variant of *spel- (to cleave, break). Compare Latin hydronym Pelso, Latin Palatium, Pashto پرښه(parša, rock, rocky ledge), Ancient Greek πέλλα (pélla, stone), German Felsen (boulder, cliff). Mostly dialectal, used in Gheg Albanian.

Adverb

fell

  1. deep, shallow
Derived terms
  • fellë
Related terms
  • fyell

Icelandic

Etymology

Old Norse fjall (mountain)

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /fɛtl/
  • Rhymes: -ɛtl

Noun

fell n (genitive singular fells, nominative plural fell)

  1. isolated hill, isolated mountain

Declension


Norwegian Bokmål

Verb

fell

  1. imperative of felle

Norwegian Nynorsk

Etymology 1

Verb

fell

  1. present of falle

Etymology 2

Verb

fell

  1. imperative of fella

Old English

Alternative forms

  • fel

Etymology

From Proto-West Germanic *fell, whence also Old High German vel.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /fell/, [feɫ]

Noun

fell n

  1. fell
  2. skin

Old Norse

Verb

fell

  1. inflection of falla:
    1. first-person singular present/past active indicative
    2. third-person singular past active indicative


English

Alternative forms

  • vitious (obsolete)

Etymology

From Middle English vicious, from Anglo-Norman vicious, (modern French vicieux), from Latin vitiōsus, from vitium (fault, vice). Equivalent to vice +‎ -ous.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈvɪʃəs/
  • Rhymes: -ɪʃəs

Adjective

vicious (comparative viciouser or more vicious, superlative viciousest or most vicious)

  1. Violent, destructive and cruel.
  2. Savage and aggressive.
  3. (archaic) Pertaining to vice; characterised by immorality or depravity.
    • , Folio Society, 2006, vol.1, p.195:
      We may so seize on vertue, that if we embrace it with an over-greedy and violent desire, it may become vicious.

Synonyms

  • scathy

Derived terms

  • vicious circle

Related terms

  • See vice#Related_terms

Translations


Middle English

Etymology

Borrowed from Anglo-Norman vicious, from Latin vitiōsus; equivalent to vice +‎ -ous.

Alternative forms

  • viciows, vicius, vycious, vycyus, vicyous, vecyous, vysyous, vycios, vycyous, vicyows

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /visiˈuːs/, /visˈjuːs/, /ˈvisjus/

Adjective

vicious (plural and weak singular viciouse)

  1. Iniquitous, sinful, wicked (often in a way that causes harm or vice to/in others)
  2. (rare) Lacking purity or cleanness; spoiled or defiled.
  3. (rare) Inaccurate, modified, or debased; of substandard quality.
  4. (rare) Injurious, dangerous; causing serious harm.

Descendants

  • English: vicious
  • Scots: veecious

References

  • “viciǒus, adj.”, in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007, retrieved 2019-03-01.

Old French

Etymology

From Latin vitiōsus;

Adjective

vicious m (oblique and nominative feminine singular viciouse)

  1. vicious; malicious
  2. defective; not capable of functioning

Declension

Descendants

  • Middle English: vicious, viciows, vicius, vycious, vycyus, vicyous, vecyous, vysyous, vycios, vycyous, vicyows
    • English: vicious
    • Scots: veecious

References

  • vicios on the Anglo-Norman On-Line Hub

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