felon vs whitlow what difference

what is difference between felon and whitlow

English

Pronunciation

  • enPR: fĕl’ən, IPA(key): /ˈfɛlən/
  • Rhymes: -ɛlən

Etymology 1

From Middle English felun, feloun, from Anglo-Norman felun (traitor, wretch), from Medieval Latin fellō, from Frankish *fellō (wicked person), from Proto-Germanic *fillô, *filjô (flayer, whipper, scoundrel), from Proto-Germanic *faluz (cruel, evil) (compare English fell (fierce), Middle High German vālant (imp)), related to *fellaną (compare Dutch villen, German fillen (to whip, beat), both from Proto-Indo-European *pelh₂- (to stir, move, swing) (compare Old Irish ad·ella (to seek), di·ella (to yield), Umbrian pelsatu (to overcome, conquer), Latin pellō (to drive, beat), Latvian lijuôs, plītiês (to force, impose), Ancient Greek πέλας (pélas, near), πίλναμαι (pílnamai, I approach), Old Armenian հալածեմ (halacem, I pursue).

Noun

felon (plural felons)

  1. A person who has committed a felony.
    • 1859, Charles Dickens, A Tale of Two Cities, James Nisbet & Company (1902), Book 3, Chapter 6, page 340:
      Looking at the Jury and the turbulent audience, he might have thought that the usual order of things was reversed, and that the felons were trying the honest men.
  2. (law) A person who has been tried and convicted of a felony.
  3. A wicked person.
Synonyms
  • (one who has committed a felony): criminal; convict; malefactor; culprit
Related terms
  • felonious
  • felonize
  • felony
Translations

Adjective

felon

  1. wicked; cruel

Etymology 2

Probably from Latin fel (gall, poison).

Noun

felon (plural felons)

  1. (medicine) A bacterial infection at the end of a finger or toe.

See also

  • whitlow

References

  • felon in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.
  • felon at OneLook Dictionary Search

Anagrams

  • flone

Esperanto

Noun

felon

  1. accusative singular of felo

Old French

Alternative forms

  • felun, feloun, felloun

Etymology

From Medieval Latin fellō, from Frankish *fellō (evildoer).

Noun

felon m (oblique plural felons, nominative singular felons, nominative plural felon)

  1. evildoer; wrongdoer
  2. immoral person

Declension

Adjective

felon m (oblique and nominative feminine singular felone)

  1. bastard; idiot (a general pejorative)
  2. evil; bad; immoral

Declension

Related terms

  • felonie

Descendants

  • Middle French: felon
    • French: félon
  • Norman: fflon
  • Picard: fèlôn
  • Middle Dutch: fel, felle (reborrowing)
  • Middle English: felun, feloun
    • Scots: felloun
    • English: felon
      • Scots: felon, fellin
  • Galician: felón
  • Spanish: felón

References


Romanian

Etymology

From Old Church Slavonic фелонь (felonĭ), from Ancient Greek φελόνιον (phelónion).

Noun

felon n (plural feloane)

  1. cape worn by the priest over the liturgical garments

Declension



English

Etymology

Alteration of whitflaw, the first element coming from either Middle Dutch vijt or Low German fit (abscess). See flaw.

Pronunciation

  • (US) IPA(key): /ˈʍɪt.loʊ/, /ˈwɪt.loʊ/

Noun

whitlow (plural whitlows)

  1. An infection under the cuticle of a fingernail or toenail.

Synonyms

  • nimpingang (UK dialect, archaic)
  • paronychia
  • wicklow (common misspelling in some regions)

Coordinate terms

  • agnail, hangnail

Translations

Further reading

  • Douglas Harper (2001–2021), “whitlow”, in Online Etymology Dictionary.

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