felt vs mat what difference

what is difference between felt and mat

English

Alternative forms

  • felte (archaic)

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /fɛlt/
  • Rhymes: -ɛlt

Etymology 1

From Middle English felt, from Old English felt, from Proto-West Germanic *felt (compare Dutch vilt, German Filz, Danish filt, French feutre), from Proto-Indo-European *pilto, *pilso ‘felt’ (compare Latin pilleus (felt, adjective), Old Church Slavonic плъсть (plŭstĭ), Albanian plis, Ancient Greek πῖλος (pîlos)), from *pel- ‘to beat’. More at anvil.

Noun

felt (countable and uncountable, plural felts)

  1. A cloth or stuff made of matted fibres of wool, or wool and fur, fulled or wrought into a compact substance by rolling and pressure, with lees or size, without spinning or weaving.
  2. A hat made of felt.
  3. A felt-tip pen.
  4. (obsolete) A skin or hide; a fell; a pelt.
Related terms
  • felt grain: the grain of timber which is transverse to the annular rings or plates; the direction of the medullary rays in oak and some other timber. — Knight
  • felt-tip pen
  • coated felt sheet
  • saturated felt
Translations

Verb

felt (third-person singular simple present felts, present participle felting, simple past and past participle felted)

  1. (transitive) To make into felt, or a feltlike substance; to cause to adhere and mat together.
    • 1677, Matthew Hale, The Primitive Origination of Mankind, Considered and Examined According to the Light of Nature
      the same Wool , for instance , one Men felts it into a Hat, another weaves it into Cloth , another weaves it into Kersey or Serge
  2. (transitive) To cover with, or as if with, felt.
  3. (transitive, poker) To cause a player to lose all their chips.
Translations

Etymology 2

Old English fēled, corresponding to feel +‎ -ed.

Verb

felt

  1. simple past tense and past participle of feel

Adjective

felt (comparative more felt, superlative most felt)

  1. That has been experienced or perceived.
    • 2009, Diarmaid MacCulloch, A History of Christianity, Penguin 2010, p. 257:
      Conversions to Islam can therefore be a deeply felt aesthetic experience that rarely occurs in Christian accounts of conversion, which are generally the source rather than the result of a Christian experience of beauty.

Anagrams

  • TEFL, flet, left

Danish

Etymology 1

From Middle Low German velt, from Proto-Indo-European *pelh₂- (flat).

Gender changed by influence from mark.

Noun

felt c (singular definite felten, not used in plural form)

  1. field (the practical part of something)
  2. (e.g., sciences, military) field; an outlying area, as opposed to e.g. the lab, office or barracks
    • 2017, Palle Lauring, Svenskekrige og enevoldsmagt, Gyldendal A/S (→ISBN)
      Han oplevede hele Tredveårskrigen i felten, fra først til sidst.

      He experienced all of the thirty-years war in the field, from the beginning to the end.
    • 1913, Anno 13 [i.e. tretten]: Tysklands rejsning mod Napoleon for 100 år siden
      Han var rykket i Felten som Kaptain og Kompagnifører, men var dog nu blevet forfremmet til Major, …

      He had deployed as a captain and a company-leader, but had now been promoted to major, …
    • 1986, Johannes Møllehave, Vor tids tid: nutidige og utidige tids- og tankespring
      Efter anden verdenskrig skrev Theodor W. Adorno: »Bemærkede man da ikke ved krigsslutningen, at folk kom stumme tilbage fra felten?
    • 2012, Daniel Silva, Portræt af en spion: En Gabriel Allon-roman, Rosinante & Co (→ISBN)
      Han overvågede Sovjetunionens sammenbrud, ikke ude fra felten, men fra et komfortabelt kontor i Langley, …

      He surveyed the collapse of the Soviet Union, not from the field, but from a comfortable office in Langley, …
    • 1918, Georg Friedrich Nicolai, Krigens Biologi
      … Officerer og Mandskab, som vendte hjem fra Felten, …
    • 1986, Grønland: årsberetning
      I felten blev der ikke observeret nogen torske larver i prøverne, …

      In the field, no cod larvae were observed in the samples, …
    • 1993, Danmarks geologiske undersøgelse, Årsberetning for … ; Arbejdsprogram …
      En af instituttets vigtigste opgaver i forbindelse med geologiske undersøgelser er dataindsamling i felten.

      One of the institute’s most important tasks relating to the geological surveys is data collection in the field.
Derived terms

Etymology 2

From German Feld, from Old High German feld, from Proto-Indo-European *pelh₂- (flat).

Noun

felt n (singular definite feltet, plural indefinite felter)

  1. field
  2. sphere, province
  3. square
Inflection
Derived terms

References

  • “felt” in Den Danske Ordbog
  • “felt,2” in Den Danske Ordbog

Middle English

Alternative forms

  • felte, feltte, feelte

Etymology

From Old English felt, from Proto-West Germanic *felt.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /fɛlt/

Noun

felt (plural feltes)

  1. Felted fabric or a sample or swab of it; felt.
  2. A piece of headgear made from felted fabric; a felt hat.

Derived terms

  • felten
  • felter

Descendants

  • English: felt
  • Scots: felt

References

  • “felt, n.”, in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007, retrieved 2018-09-10.

Norwegian Bokmål

Etymology 1

From German Feld

Noun

felt n (definite singular feltet, indefinite plural felt or felter, definite plural felta or feltene)

  1. field
Derived terms

Etymology 2

From Middle Low German velt

Noun

felt m (definite singular felten, uncountable)

  1. field (in the military sense)
Derived terms
  • feltarbeid (from English)
  • feltprest
  • feltrasjon
  • felttog

Etymology 3

Verb

felt

  1. past participle of felle

References

  • “felt” in The Bokmål Dictionary.
  • NAOB [1]

Norwegian Nynorsk

Etymology 1

From German Feld

Noun

felt n (definite singular feltet, indefinite plural felt, definite plural felta)

  1. field
Derived terms

Etymology 2

From Middle Low German velt

Noun

felt m (definite singular felten, uncountable)

  1. field (in the military sense)
Derived terms
  • feltarbeid (from English)
  • feltprest
  • feltrasjon
  • felttog

Etymology 3

Verb

felt

  1. past participle of fella

References

  • “felt” in The Nynorsk Dictionary.

Old Dutch

Etymology

From Proto-West Germanic *felþu, from Proto-Germanic *felþą.

Noun

felt n

  1. field

Inflection

This noun needs an inflection-table template.

Descendants

  • Middle Dutch: velt
    • Dutch: veld
      • Afrikaans: veld
        • English: veld
      • Negerhollands: veld

Further reading

  • “felt”, in Oudnederlands Woordenboek, 2012

Old English

Etymology

From Proto-West Germanic *felt.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /felt/, [feɫt]

Noun

felt m

  1. felt

Declension

Descendants

  • Middle English: felt
    • Scots: felt
    • English: felt

Westrobothnian

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [félt], [fé̞lt]

Adjective

felt n

  1. (neuter, impersonal, as an adverb) urgent, necessary, pressing, important
    Fäll var ä felt

    Certainly it was necessary.
    Hä jär int na felt om hä

    There is no hurry therewith.

Yola

Etymology

From Middle English fillen, from Old English fyllan, from Proto-West Germanic *fullijan.

Verb

felt

  1. filled

References

  • Jacob Poole (1867), William Barnes, editor, A Glossary, With some Pieces of Verse, of the old Dialect of the English Colony in the Baronies of Forth and Bargy, County of Wexford, Ireland, London: J. Russell Smith


English

Pronunciation

  • (UK) enPR: măt, IPA(key): /mæt/
  • (US) enPR: măt, IPA(key): /mæt/, [mæʔ(t̚)]
  • Homophones: Matt, matte
  • Rhymes: -æt

Etymology 1

From Middle English matte, from Old English meatte, from Late Latin matta, from Punic or Phoenician (compare Hebrew מיטה \ מִטָּה(mitá, bed, couch)).

Noun

mat (plural mats)

  1. A flat piece of coarse material used for wiping one’s feet, or as a decorative or protective floor covering.
  2. A small flat piece of material used to protect a surface from anything hot or rough; a coaster.
  3. (athletics) A floor pad to protect athletes.
  4. A thickly tangled mess.
    • 1953, Samuel Beckett, Watt
      But to return to where we left her, I see her still, propped up in a kind of stupor against one of the walls in which this wretched edifice abounds, her long grey greasy hair framing in its cowl of scrofulous mats a face where pallor, languor, hunger, acne, recent dirt, immemorial chagrin and surplus hair seemed to dispute the mastery.
  5. A thin layer of woven, non-woven, or knitted fiber that serves as reinforcement to a material.
  6. A thin surface layer; superficial cover.
Derived terms
Translations

Verb

mat (third-person singular simple present mats, present participle matting, simple past and past participle matted)

  1. (transitive) To cover, protect or decorate with mats.
  2. (intransitive) To form a thick, tangled mess; to interweave into, or like, a mat; to entangle.
    • And o’er his eyebrows hung his matted hair.
Translations

Etymology 2

Compare matte.

Alternative forms

  • matt

Noun

mat

  1. (coppersmithing) An alloy of copper, tin, iron, etc.; white metal.

Etymology 3

A clipped form of matinee.

Noun

mat (plural mats)

  1. (dated slang) Abbreviation of matinee (performance at a theater).
    • 1898, The Hotel/Motor Hotel Monthly, Vol. 6, page 27:
      A gents’ toilet room might be found in a house that caters for the cheaper class of theatrical patronage, where the slangy language of the “goin’ to the mat this aft?” style prevails. A gents toilet room is not found in the Southern Hotel. It either “men’s” or “gentlemen’s”.

Etymology 4

A clipped form of material.

Noun

mat (plural mats)

  1. (video games, slang) A material or component needed for a crafting recipe.

Etymology 5

Noun

mat (plural mats)

  1. Alternative spelling of matte (decorative border around a picture)

Etymology 6

Noun

mat (plural mats)

  1. (printing) Short for matrix.

Etymology 7

Adjective

mat

  1. Alternative form of matte (not reflecting light)
    • 2013, K. A. Spencer, Agromyzidae (Diptera) of Economic Importance (page 264)
      Frons mat black, orbits slightly paler, more greyish; mesonotum distinctly mat, greyish-black, but with some subshine; []

Anagrams

  • AMT, ATM, MTA, TAM, TMA, amt, amt., atm, tam

Ainu

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /mat/

Noun

mat (Kana spelling マッ)

  1. (mainly in compounds) woman, female
  2. wife

Synonyms

  • menoko

Antonyms

  • (woman): okkayo (man)
  • (wife): hoku (husband)

Derived terms

  • matne (female)

Albanian

Etymology

From Proto-Albanian *mata, from pre-Albanian *mn̥to, from Proto-Indo-European *men- (to tower, stand out) (compare Welsh mynydd, Latin mōns, Avestan mati (mati)).

Noun

mat m (indefinite plural mate, definite singular mati, definite plural matet)

  1. seacoast
  2. riverbank
  3. sandy shore, sandy beach

Synonyms

  • (sandy beach): ranishtë

References


Atong (India)

Etymology

Cognate with Garo mat/Garo mat-. This etymology is incomplete. You can help Wiktionary by elaborating on the origins of this term.

Noun

mat

  1. wild animal

Derived terms

References

  • van Breugel, Seino. 2015. Atong-English dictionary, second edition. Available online: https://www.academia.edu/487044/Atong_English_Dictionary.

Breton

Etymology

From Proto-Celtic *matis (compare Irish maith).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /maːd/

Adjective

mat

  1. good

Related terms

  • ma

Mutation


Catalan

Noun

mat m (plural mats)

  1. checkmate

Derived terms

  • escac i mat

Czech

Etymology

Ultimately from Persian شاه مات(šāh māt, the king died).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /mat/

Noun

mat m

  1. checkmate

Declension

Derived terms

Further reading

  • mat in Příruční slovník jazyka českého, 1935–1957
  • mat in Slovník spisovného jazyka českého, 1960–1971, 1989

Danish

Adjective

mat (neuter mat, plural and definite singular attributive matte)

  1. dull, not shiny
  2. tired

Dutch

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /mɑt/
  • Hyphenation: mat
  • Rhymes: -ɑt

Etymology 1

From Middle Dutch matte, borrowed from Latin matta. Cognates include English mat and German Matte.

Noun

mat m or f (plural matten, diminutive matje n)

  1. rug, mat
  2. (hairstyle, chiefly diminutive) mullet
Derived terms
  • deurmat
  • hangmat
  • kokosmat
  • mattenklopper
  • muismat
  • rietmat
  • slaapmat
  • turnmat
Related terms
  • placemat
Descendants
  • Papiamentu: mat

Etymology 2

From Middle Dutch mat (checkmate), borrowed from Old French mat, borrowed from Persian شاه مات(šâh mât, the king is dead). Cognate to English checkmate.

Noun

mat n (plural matten)

  1. checkmate
Related terms
  • schaakmat

Etymology 3

From Middle Dutch mat, borrowed from Old French mat, from Latin mattus (depressed). See also French mat (adjective).

Adjective

mat (comparative matter, superlative matst)

  1. matte, not reflecting light
  2. dull, uninteresting
Inflection
Derived terms
  • matglas

Verb

mat

  1. first-, second- and third-person singular present indicative of matten
  2. imperative of matten

Etymology 4

See Dutch meten.

Verb

mat

  1. singular past indicative of meten

References

  • “mat” in Woordenlijst Nederlandse Taal – Officiële Spelling, Nederlandse Taalunie. [the official spelling word list for the Dutch language]
  • Notes:

Anagrams

  • tam

Emilian

Alternative forms

  • mât (Modenese, Reggiano)

Pronunciation

  • Hyphenation: mat

Noun

mat m (plural mat) (Mirandola)

  1. insane

Synonyms

  • matùs (Carpigiano)

Faroese

Etymology

From the noun matur.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /mɛaːt/
  • Rhymes: -ɛaːt
  • Homophone: mæt

Noun

mat

  1. accusative singular of matur.

Anagrams

  • amt

French

Etymology 1

Probably from Latin mattus, which is from madere; see Italian matto.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ma/
  • Rhymes: -a
  • Homophone: ma

Adjective

mat (feminine singular mate, masculine plural mats, feminine plural mates)

  1. matt
  2. pale

Etymology 2

Abbreviation of the French expression échec et mat, from Persian شاه مات(shah mat, the king is ambushed).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /mat/
  • Rhymes: -at
  • Homophones: mate, matent, mates, matte, mattent, mattes, math, maths

Adjective

mat (feminine singular mate, masculine plural mats, feminine plural mates)

  1. checkmated

Noun

mat m (plural mats)

  1. checkmate

Derived terms

  • échec et mat

References

  • Notes:

Anagrams

  • AMT

Further reading

  • “mat” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

Garo

Noun

mat

  1. squirrel

Prefix

mat

  1. prefix for mammals

Gothic

Romanization

mat

  1. Romanization of ????????????

Icelandic

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /maːt/
  • Rhymes: -aːt

Etymology 1

Noun

mat n (genitive singular mats, nominative plural möt)

  1. (usually uncountable) evaluation
Declension
Related terms
  • meta (to evaluate)

Etymology 2

See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

Noun

mat

  1. inflection of matur:
    1. indefinite accusative singular
    2. indefinite dative singular

Luxembourgish

Etymology

From Old High German mit, from Proto-Germanic *midi. Cognate with German mit, Dutch met, West Frisian mei, Icelandic með.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /mɑt/
    Rhymes: -ɑt

Preposition

mat

  1. with

Antonyms

  • ouni

Maricopa

Noun

mat

  1. earth

Marshallese

Pronunciation

  • (phonetic) IPA(key): [mʲɑtˠ]
  • (phonemic) IPA(key): /mʲætˠ/
  • Bender phonemes: {mat}

Etymology 1

From Proto-Micronesian *masu, from Proto-Oceanic *masuʀ, contraction of Proto-Eastern Malayo-Polynesian *mabosuʀ, from Proto-Malayo-Polynesian *bəsuʀ, from Proto-Austronesian *bəsuʀ. Cognate with Tongan mahu (abound in food).

Adjective

mat

  1. full (after eating), satiated

Etymology 2

Adjective

mat

  1. cooked

References

  • Marshallese–English Online Dictionary

Northern Sami

Pronoun

mat

  1. nominative plural of mii

Norwegian Bokmål

Pronunciation

IPA(key): /maːt/, [mɑːt̻]

Rhymes: -aːt

Etymology 1

From Old Norse matr. Cognates include: Danish mad, Swedish mat, Gothic ???????????????? (mats), Old English mete (English meat).

Noun

mat m (definite singular maten, uncountable)

  1. food
Derived terms
Related terms
  • mate

See also

  • føde
  • næring

Etymology 2

Verb

mat

  1. imperative of mate

References

  • “mat” in The Bokmål Dictionary.

Norwegian Nynorsk

Etymology

From Old Norse matr.

Noun

mat m (definite singular maten, uncountable)

  1. food

Derived terms

References

  • “mat” in The Nynorsk Dictionary.

Old French

Adjective

mat m (oblique and nominative feminine singular mate)

  1. checkmated; in checkmate

Old Irish

Verb

mat

  1. third-person plural present subjunctive of masu

Paipai

Noun

mat

  1. land

Polish

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /mat/

Etymology 1

From Arabic مَات(māt), from Persian شاه مات(šâh mât).

Noun

mat m anim

  1. checkmate
Declension

Etymology 2

Borrowed from Dutch maat.

Noun

mat m pers

  1. mate (a ship’s officer)
  2. mate (in naval ranks, a non-commissioned officer)
Declension

Etymology 3

Borrowed from German matt.

Noun

mat m inan

  1. matt, matte, dull colour or surface
Declension
Derived terms
  • matowy

Etymology 4

See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

Noun

mat f

  1. genitive plural of mata

Further reading

  • mat in Wielki słownik języka polskiego, Instytut Języka Polskiego PAN
  • mat in Polish dictionaries at PWN

Romanian

Etymology

From French mat.

Adjective

mat m or n (feminine singular mată, masculine plural mați, feminine and neuter plural mate)

  1. matte

Declension


Romansch

Etymology

From Latin marītus.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [mat]

Noun

mat m

  1. boy

Semai

Etymology

From Proto-Aslian *mat, from Proto-Mon-Khmer *mat (eye). Cognate with Khmer មាត់ (mŏət), Mon မတ် (mòt), Vietnamese mắt, Car Nicobarese mat.

Noun

mat

  1. eye

References


Slavomolisano

Etymology

From Serbo-Croatian mati.

Noun

mat f

  1. mother

Declension

References

  • Ivica Peša Matracki and Nada Županović Filipin (2014), Changes in the System of Oblique Cases in Molise Croatian Dialect.
  • Walter Breu and Giovanni Piccoli (2000), Dizionario croato molisano di Acquaviva Collecroce: Dizionario plurilingue della lingua slava della minoranza di provenienza dalmata di Acquaviva Collecroce in Provincia di Campobasso (Parte grammaticale).

Slovak

Etymology

From Arabic مَاتَ(māta) in Persian شاه مات(šâh mât, the king is dead).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /mat/

Noun

mat m (genitive singular matu, nominative plural maty, genitive plural matov, declension pattern of dub)

  1. The final move in a chess game, the checkmate.

Declension

Derived terms

  • matový

Related terms

  • šach-mat

References

  • mat in Slovak dictionaries at slovnik.juls.savba.sk

Anagrams

  • tam
  • tma

Spanish

Etymology

From English mat.

Noun

mat m (plural mats)

  1. mat (for exercise)

Swedish

Etymology

From Old Norse matr, from Proto-Germanic *matiz, from Proto-Indo-European *meh₂d-.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /mɑːt/

Noun

mat c

  1. food

Declension

Derived terms

References

  • mat in Svenska Akademiens ordlista (SAOL)

Anagrams

  • tam

Tok Pisin

Etymology

From English mat.

Noun

mat

  1. sitting or sleeping mat

Volapük

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /mat/

Noun

mat (nominative plural mats)

  1. marriage, wedlock, matrimony

Declension

Derived terms

  • matan
  • matikön
  • matön

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