fence vs fencing what difference

what is difference between fence and fencing

English

Etymology

From Middle English fence, fens, short for defence, defens (the act of defending), from Old French defens, defense (see defence).

The sense “enclosure” arises in the mid 15th century.
Also from the 15th century is use as a verb in the sense “to enclose with a fence”. The generalized sense “to defend, screen, protect” arises ca. 1500. The sense “to fight with swords (rapiers)” is from the 1590s (Shakespeare).

Displaced native Old English edor.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /fɛns/, [fɛns], [fɛnts]
  • Rhymes: -ɛns

Noun

fence (countable and uncountable, plural fences)

  1. A thin artificial barrier that separates two pieces of land or a house perimeter.
  2. Someone who hides or buys and sells stolen goods, a criminal middleman for transactions of stolen goods.
  3. (by extension) The place whence such a middleman operates.
  4. Skill in oral debate.
  5. (obsolete, uncountable) The art or practice of fencing.
  6. A guard or guide on machinery.
  7. (figuratively) A barrier, for example an emotional barrier.
  8. (computing, programming) A memory barrier.

Hyponyms

  • catch fence
  • electric fence
  • picket fence
  • snow fence

Derived terms

Descendants

  • Pennsylvania German: Fens

Translations

See also

  • wire netting
  • wire gauze

Verb

fence (third-person singular simple present fences, present participle fencing, simple past and past participle fenced)

  1. (transitive) To enclose, contain or separate by building fence.
  2. (transitive) To defend or guard.
  3. (transitive) To engage in the selling or buying of stolen goods.
    • The Bat—they called him the Bat. []. He’d never been in stir, the bulls had never mugged him, he didn’t run with a mob, he played a lone hand, and fenced his stuff so that even the fence couldn’t swear he knew his face.
  4. (intransitive, sports) To engage in the sport of fencing.
  5. (intransitive, equestrianism) To jump over a fence.
  6. (intransitive) To conceal the truth by giving equivocal answers; to hedge; to be evasive.
    • 1981, A. D. Hope, “His Coy Mistress to Mr. Marvell,” A Book of Answers:
      A lady, sir, as you will find, / Keeps counsel, or she speaks her mind, / Means what she says and scorns to fence / And palter with feigned innocence.

Synonyms

  • (to sell or buy stolen goods): pawn

Derived terms

  • ring-fence, ringfence

Translations


Czech

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ˈfɛnt͡sɛ]
  • Rhymes: -ɛntsɛ
  • Hyphenation: fen‧ce

Noun

fence

  1. dative singular of fenka
  2. locative singular of fenka


English

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈfɛnsɪŋ/
  • Rhymes: -ɛnsɪŋ

Verb

fencing

  1. present participle of fence

Noun

fencing (countable and uncountable, plural fencings)

  1. The art or sport of duelling with swords, especially with the 17th- to 18th-century European dueling swords and the practice weapons descended from them (sport fencing)
  2. Material used to make fences, fences used as barriers or an enclosure.
    Fencing was erected around the field to keep the horses in.
  3. receiving and buying of stolen goods

Derived terms

  • geofencing

Translations

See also

  • fencing on Wikipedia.Wikipedia

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