fender vs wing what difference

what is difference between fender and wing

English

Etymology

fend +‎ -er

Pronunciation

  • (UK) IPA(key): /ˈfɛnd.ə(ɹ)/
  • Rhymes: -ɛndə(r)

Noun

fender (plural fenders)

  1. (US) panel of a car which encloses the wheel area, especially the front wheels
    Synonyms: (Australian) guard, (British) [Term?], (British) wheel arch, [Term?], wing
  2. (US) a shield, usually of plastic or metal, on a bicycle that protects the rider from mud or water
    Synonym: (British) mudguard
  3. (nautical) any shaped cushion-like object normally made from polymers, rubber or wood that is placed along the sides of a boat to prevent damage when moored alongside another vessel or jetty, or when using a lock, etc. Modern variations are cylindrical although older wooden version and rubbing strips can still be found; old tyres are used as a cheap substitute
  4. a low metal framework in front of a fireplace, intended to catch hot coals, soot, and ash
    • 1907, E.M. Forster, The Longest Journey, Part I, I [Uniform ed., p. 12]:

Derived terms

Translations

Verb

fender (third-person singular simple present fenders, present participle fendering, simple past and past participle fendered)

  1. (nautical) To use fenders to protect the side of a boat

Gallery

Anagrams

  • ferned, nerfed

Asturian

Verb

fender

  1. to split; to shatter
  2. to open up
  3. to chill; to send a chill down someone’s spine

Galician

Etymology

From Old Galician and Old Portuguese fender (13th century, Cantigas de Santa Maria), from Latin findere, from Proto-Indo-European *bʰeyd- (to split). Cognate with Portuguese fender and Spanish hendir.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /fenˈdeɾ/

Verb

fender (first-person singular present fendo, first-person singular preterite fendín, past participle fendido)

  1. to split, cleave, rip
    • 1370, Ramón Lorenzo (ed.), Crónica troiana. A Coruña: Fundación Barrié, page 426:
      Et tal colpe lle deu per meo do escudo que logo llo fendeu de çima ata fondo

      And he so hardly stroke his [enemy’s] shield by the middle that at the moment he split it, from top to bottom
    • 1409, J. L. Pensado Tomé (ed.), Tratado de Albeitaria. Santiago de Compostela: Centro Ramón Piñeiro, page 89:
      Quando as ditas llandoas creçeren asy como Nozes, ou mais ou menos, traua dellas llogo et apretaas et fendeas ao llongo con canyuete agudo

      when these growths become big as nuts, give or take, grab them readily and squeeze them and cut them open lengthwise with a sharp knife
  2. to crack
  3. to separate
  4. to break through

Conjugation

Derived terms

  • fenda

References

  • “fender” in Dicionario de Dicionarios do galego medieval, SLI – ILGA 2006-2012.
  • “fender” in Xavier Varela Barreiro & Xavier Gómez Guinovart: Corpus Xelmírez – Corpus lingüístico da Galicia medieval. SLI / Grupo TALG / ILG, 2006-2016.
  • “fender” in Dicionario de Dicionarios da lingua galega, SLI – ILGA 2006-2013.
  • “fender” in Tesouro informatizado da lingua galega. Santiago: ILG.
  • “fender” in Álvarez, Rosario (coord.): Tesouro do léxico patrimonial galego e portugués, Santiago de Compostela: Instituto da Lingua Galega.

Norwegian Bokmål

Etymology

From English fender

Noun

fender m (definite singular fenderen, indefinite plural fendere or fendre or fendrer, definite plural fenderne or fendrene)

  1. (nautical) a fender

References

  • “fender” in The Bokmål Dictionary.

Norwegian Nynorsk

Etymology

From English fender

Noun

fender m (definite singular fenderen, indefinite plural fenderar, definite plural fenderane)

  1. (nautical) a fender

References

  • “fender” in The Nynorsk Dictionary.

Portuguese

Etymology

From Latin findere, present active infinitive of findō, from Proto-Italic *findō, from Proto-Indo-European *bʰeyd- (to split).

Verb

fender (first-person singular present indicative fendo, past participle fendido)

  1. to split, cleave, rip
  2. to crack
  3. to separate
  4. first-person singular (eu) personal infinitive of fender
  5. third-person singular (ele and ela, also used with você and others) personal infinitive of fender
  6. first-person singular (eu) future subjunctive of fender
  7. third-person singular (ele and ela, also used with você and others) future subjunctive of fender

Conjugation

Related terms

  • fenda

Vilamovian

Pronunciation

Noun

fender m

  1. forester


English

Etymology

From Middle English winge, wenge, from Old Norse vængr (wing), from Proto-Germanic *wēinga, *wēingan-. Cognate with Danish vinge (wing), Swedish vinge (wing), Icelandic vængur (wing), West Frisian wjuk (wing), from *h₂weh₁- (to blow), thus related to wind. Replaced native Middle English fither (from Old English fiþre, from Proto-Germanic *fiþriją), which merged with fether (from Old English feþer, from Proto-Germanic *feþrō). More at feather.

Pronunciation

  • enPR: wĭng, IPA(key): /wɪŋ/
  • Rhymes: -ɪŋ

Noun

wing (plural wings)

  1. An appendage of an animal’s (bird, bat, insect) body that enables it to fly
  2. A fin at the side of a ray or similar fish
  3. (slang) Human arm.
  4. (aviation) Part of an aircraft that produces the lift for rising into the air.
  5. One of the large pectoral fins of a flying fish.
  6. One of the broad, thin, anterior lobes of the foot of a pteropod, used as an organ in swimming.
  7. (botany) Any membranaceous expansion, such as that along the sides of certain stems, or of a fruit of the kind called samara.
  8. (botany) Either of the two side petals of a papilionaceous flower.
  9. A side shoot of a tree or plant; a branch growing up by the side of another.
  10. Passage by flying; flight.
  11. Limb or instrument of flight; means of flight or of rapid motion.
  12. A part of something that is lesser in size than the main body, such as an extension from the main building.
  13. Anything that agitates the air as a wing does, or is put in winglike motion by the action of the air, such as a fan or vane for winnowing grain, the vane or sail of a windmill, etc.
  14. A protruding piece of material on a menstrual pad to hold it in place and prevent leakage.
  15. An ornament worn on the shoulder; a small epaulet or shoulder knot.
  16. A cosmetic effect where eyeliner curves outward and ends at a point.
  17. A faction of a political movement. Usually implies a position apart from the mainstream center position.
  18. An organizational grouping in a military aviation service:
    1. (Britain) A unit of command consisting of two or more squadrons and itself being a sub-unit of a group or station.
    2. (US) A larger formation of two or more groups, which in turn control two or more squadrons.
  19. (Britain) A panel of a car which encloses the wheel area, especially the front wheels.
  20. (nautical) A platform on either side of the bridge of a vessel, normally found in pairs.
  21. (nautical) That part of the hold or orlop of a vessel which is nearest the sides. In a fleet, one of the extremities when the ships are drawn up in line, or when forming the two sides of a triangle.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Totten to this entry?)
  22. (sports) A position in several field games on either side of the field.
  23. (sports) A player occupying such a position, also called a winger
  24. (typography, informal, rare) A háček.
    • 1985, David Grambs, Literary Companion Dictionary, page 378:
      ˇ wing, wedge, hǎcek, inverted circumflex (Karel Čapek)
  25. (theater) One of the unseen areas on the side of the stage in a theatre.
  26. (in the plural) The insignia of a qualified pilot or aircrew member.
    • 2004: Chris Wallace, Character: Profiles in Presidential Courage
      Anyone and everyone with wings – press officers, operations specialists, even General Curtis LeMay, commander of the U.S. Air Force in Europe – was put on flight duty and took turns flying double shifts for “Operation Vittles.”
  27. A portable shelter consisting of a fabric roof on a frame, like a tent without sides.
  28. On the Enneagram, one of the two adjacent types to an enneatype that forms an individual’s subtype of his or her enneatype

Alternative forms

  • weng, whing, wyng (all obsolete)

Synonyms

  • (panel of a car): fender (US), guard (Australia)
  • (sports position): forward
  • (U.S. Air Force): delta (U.S. Space Force), garrison (U.S. Space Force)

Hyponyms

  • left wing
  • right wing

Derived terms

Related terms

  • on the wing
  • take under one’s wing
  • wing it
  • wait in the wings

Translations

Verb

wing (third-person singular simple present wings, present participle winging, simple past and past participle winged or (nonstandard) wung)

  1. (transitive) To injure slightly (as with a gunshot), especially in the wing or arm.
  2. (intransitive) To fly.
    • Breezes blowing from beds of iris quickened her breath with their perfume; she saw the tufted lilacs sway in the wind, and the streamers of mauve-tinted wistaria swinging, all a-glisten with golden bees; she saw a crimson cardinal winging through the foliage, and amorous tanagers flashing like scarlet flames athwart the pines.
  3. (transitive, of a building) To add a wing (extra part) to.
  4. (transitive) To act or speak extemporaneously; to improvise; to wing it.
  5. (transitive) To throw.
  6. (transitive) To furnish with wings.
  7. (transitive) To transport with, or as if with, wings; to bear in flight, or speedily.
  8. (transitive) To traverse by flying.

Translations

Anagrams

  • Gwin, gwin

Middle English

Noun

wing

  1. Alternative form of winge

Tok Pisin

Etymology

From English wing.

Noun

wing

  1. wing

Vilamovian

Pronunciation

Adjective

wing

  1. little (by amount)

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