ferocious vs furious what difference

what is difference between ferocious and furious

English

Etymology

Taken from Latin ferox (wild, bold, savage, fierce) (with the suffix -ous), from ferus (wild, savage, fierce).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /fəˈɹəʊʃəs/
  • Rhymes: -əʊʃəs

Adjective

ferocious (comparative more ferocious, superlative most ferocious)

  1. Marked by extreme and violent energy.
    • 1975, Saul Bellow, Humboldt’s Gift [Avon ed., 1976, p. 376]:
      But it seemed to me that there were few faces like his, with the ferocious profile that brought to mind the Latin word rapax or one of Rouault’s crazed death-dealing arbitrary kings.
  2. Extreme or intense.

Synonyms

  • fierce

Derived terms

  • ferociously

Related terms

  • ferity
  • ferocity
  • fierce
  • feral

Translations

Further reading

  • ferocious in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.
  • ferocious in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.
  • ferocious at OneLook Dictionary Search


English

Etymology

From Old French furieus, from Latin furiōsus.

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /ˈfjʊə.ɹɪəs/
  • (General American) IPA(key): /ˈfjʊɹ.i.əs/, /ˈfjɝ.i.əs/
  • Hyphenation: fu‧ri‧ous
  • Rhymes: -ʊəɹiəs

Adjective

furious (comparative more furious, superlative most furious)

  1. Feeling great anger; raging; violent.
  2. Rushing with impetuosity; moving with violence.

Derived terms

  • fast and furious
  • furiousness
  • overfurious

Translations


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