Ferret vs Mink what difference

what is difference between Ferret and Mink

English

Pronunciation

  • enPR: fĕr’ət, IPA(key): /ˈfɛɹɪt/
  • Rhymes: -ɛrɪt

Etymology 1

From Middle English furet, ferret, from Old French furet, from Vulgar Latin *furittum (weasel, ferret), diminutive of Latin fūr (thief).

Noun

ferret (plural ferrets)

  1. An often domesticated mammal (Mustela putorius furo) rather like a weasel, descended from the polecat and often trained to hunt burrowing animals.
  2. The black-footed ferret, Mustela nigripes.
  3. (figuratively) A diligent searcher.
    • 1998 July 2, Charles Nicholl, “Screaming in the Castle” in the London Review of Books, Vol. XX, No. 13:
      The most challenging documentary discoveries were made by a tenacious archival ferret, Dr Antonio Bertoletti. In 1879 he published his findings in a slim, refreshingly dry volume, Francesco Cenci e la sua Famiglia.
Related terms
  • ferret-badger
  • furtive
Translations

Verb

ferret (third-person singular simple present ferrets, present participle ferreting, simple past and past participle ferreted)

  1. To hunt game with ferrets.
  2. (by extension, transitive, intransitive) To uncover and bring to light by searching; usually to ferret out.

Translations

Etymology 2

Italian fioretto

Noun

ferret

  1. (dated) A tape of silk, cotton, or ribbon, used to tie documents, clothing, etc. or along the edge of fabric.
    • red tape and green ferret

Further reading

  • ferret on Wikipedia.Wikipedia

Anagrams

  • refret

French

Etymology

From fer +‎ -et.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /fɛ.ʁɛ/

Noun

ferret m (plural ferrets)

  1. (metal) tag; aglet, aiguillette

Further reading

  • “ferret” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

Latin

Verb

ferret

  1. third-person singular imperfect active subjunctive of ferō


English

Etymology

From Late Middle English mink (fur of the European mink), apparently from Swedish mink, mänk, menk (stinking animal in Finland, mink).

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation, General American) enPR: mĭngk, IPA(key): /mɪŋk/
  • Rhymes: -ɪŋk

Noun

mink (plural mink or minks)

  1. (plural mink or minks) Any of various semi-aquatic, carnivorous mammals in the Mustelinae subfamily, similar to weasels, with dark fur, native to Europe and America, of which two species in different genera are extant: the American mink (Neovison vison) and the European mink (Mustela lutreola).
  2. (plural mink) The fur or pelt of a mink, used to make apparel.
  3. (plural minks) An article of clothing made of mink.
  4. (Scotland, slang, derogatory) (plural minks) An individual with poor personal hygiene; a smelly person.

Alternative forms

  • minx (obsolete)

Hyponyms

  • (mammal): American mink (Neovison vison), European mink (Mustela lutreola)

Derived terms

Translations

See also

  • polecat

References

Further reading

  • mink on Wikipedia.Wikipedia
  • mink (disambiguation) on Wikipedia.Wikipedia

Danish

Noun

mink c (singular definite minken, plural indefinite mink)

  1. mink

References

  • “mink” in Den Danske Ordbog

Estonian

Etymology 1

From English mink.

Noun

mink (genitive mingi, partitive minki)

  1. American mink, Neovison vison
Declension
Synonyms
  • ameerika naarits

Etymology 2

From German Schminke.

Noun

mink (genitive mingi, partitive minki)

  1. (dated) makeup, cosmetics
Declension
Synonyms
  • meik

Hungarian

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ˈmiŋk]
  • Hyphenation: mink
  • Rhymes: -iŋk

Etymology 1

Pronoun

mink

  1. (personal, folksy) Alternative form of mi (we).
Declension

Etymology 2

mi (what) +‎ -nk (our, of ours, possessive suffix)

Pronoun

mink

  1. first-person plural single-possession possessive of mi
Declension

Further reading

  • (“we”; dialectal) mink , redirecting to (1): mi in Bárczi, Géza and László Országh: A magyar nyelv értelmező szótára (’The Explanatory Dictionary of the Hungarian Language’). Budapest: Akadémiai Kiadó, 1959–1962. Fifth ed., 1992: →ISBN

Norwegian Nynorsk

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /mɪŋk/

Etymology 1

From English mink.

Noun

mink m (definite singular minken, indefinite plural minkar, definite plural minkane)

  1. an American mink, Neovison vison or Mustela vison
    • 1928, Edv. Ryste, Mink-al:
      Å ala mink er eit gildt arbeid for alle som er glade i dyr; for det er eit vakkert dyr med mange tiltalande eigenskapar []

      Breeding mink is pleasant work for everyone who loves animals; as it is a beautiful animal with many appealing properties []

Etymology 2

Verb

mink

  1. imperative of minka

References

  • “mink” in The Nynorsk Dictionary.

Swedish

Etymology

Borrowed from Finnish or another Uralic language in a region where the mink is found.

Noun

mink c

  1. American mink (Neovison vison).

Declension

References

  • Hogg & Denison (2008): A History of the English Language

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