ferry vs ferryboat what difference

what is difference between ferry and ferryboat

English

Etymology

From Middle English ferien (to carry, convey, convey in a boat), from Old English ferian (to carry, convey, bear, bring, lead, conduct, betake oneself to, be versed in, depart, go), from Proto-West Germanic *farjan, from Proto-Germanic *farjaną (to make or let go, transfer, ferry), from Proto-Indo-European *per- (to bring or carry over, transfer, pass through).

Cognate with German dialectal feren, fähren (to row, sail), Danish færge (to ferry), Swedish färja (to ferry), Icelandic ferja (to ferry), Old Norse ferja. Related to fare.

Pronunciation

  • (General American, Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /ˈfɛɹi/
  • (Northern England) IPA(key): /ˈfɛɹɪ/
  • (Marymarrymerry distinction)
  • (Marymarrymerry merger)
  • Rhymes: -ɛɹi
    • Homophone: fairy (Marymarrymerry merger)
  • Hyphenation: fer‧ry

Verb

ferry (third-person singular simple present ferries, present participle ferrying, simple past and past participle ferried)

  1. (transitive) To carry; transport; convey.
    Trucks plowed through the water to ferry flood victims to safety.
    • 2007, Rick Bass, The Lives of Rocks:
      We ferried our stock in U-Haul trailers, and across the months, as we purchased more cowflesh from the Goat Man — meat vanishing into the ether again and again, as if into some quarkish void — we became familiar enough with Sloat and his daughter to learn that her name was Flozelle, and to visit with them about matters other than stock.
  2. (transitive) To move someone or something from one place to another, usually repeatedly.
  3. (transitive) To carry or transport over a contracted body of water, as a river or strait, in a boat or other floating conveyance plying between opposite shores.
  4. (intransitive) To pass over water in a boat or by ferry.

Noun

ferry (plural ferries)

  1. A ship used to transport people, smaller vehicles and goods from one port to another, usually on a regular schedule.
  2. A place where passengers are transported across water in such a ship.
    • 1809, Thomas Campbell, Lord Ullin’s Daughter
      to row us o’er the ferry
    • c. 1900, O. Henry, The Ferry of Unfulfilment:
      She walked into the waiting-room of the ferry, and up the stairs, and by a marvellous swift, little run, caught the ferry-boat that was just going out.
  3. The legal right or franchise that entitles a corporate body or an individual to operate such a service.
    (Can we add an example for this sense?)

Derived terms

Descendants

Translations

See also

  • boat
  • ship

Anagrams

  • Freyr, Fryer, fryer, refry

French

Etymology

Borrowed from English ferry.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /fɛ.ʁi/

Noun

ferry m (plural ferries or ferrys)

  1. ferry

Derived terms

  • car-ferry

Spanish

Alternative forms

  • ferri

Etymology

From English ferry.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈferi/, [ˈfe.ri]

Noun

ferry m (plural ferrys or ferries)

  1. ferry
    Synonyms: transbordador, trasbordador


English

Alternative forms

  • ferry-boat, ferry boat

Etymology

ferry +‎ boat

Pronunciation

  • (General American) IPA(key): /ˈfɛɹiˌboʊt/
  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /ˈfɛɹiˌbəʊt/
  • Hyphenation: fer‧ry‧boat

Noun

ferryboat (plural ferryboats)

  1. (nautical) A boat used to ferry passengers, vehicles, or goods across open water, especially one that runs to a regular schedule
    • 1893, James Wells Goodwin, Peyton Boyle, Robert Desty, The Federal reporter, Vol. 54, page 206
      He insists that it is practically undisputed that, when the ferryboat crossed the bow of the tug to make her slip, she crossed at a distance of at least 300 feet away
    • 1940, LIFE, Sep 2, 1940, page 59
      The ferryboat “Argentina” rides toward Golden Gate, her ocean-going prow slicing the waves.
    • 1983, Mary Stiles Kline, George Albert Bayless, Ferryboats: a legend on Puget Sound, link
      It was on this vessel that the founder of the second largest ferryboat company on Puget Sound…

Descendants

  • Sicilian: ferrubbottu

Translations


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