festival vs fete what difference

what is difference between festival and fete

English

Etymology

From Old French festival, from Late Latin fēstīvālis, from Latin fēstīvus (festive).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈfɛstəvəl/

Adjective

festival (comparative more festival, superlative most festival)

  1. Pertaining to a feast or feast day. (Now only as the noun used attributively.)
    • 1590, Edmund Spenser, The Faerie Queene, II.iii:
      the temple of the Gods […] / Whom all the people decke with girlands greene, / And honour in their festiuall resort […].

Noun

festival (plural festivals)

  1. (biblical) A feast or feast day.
    • Deuteronomy 16:16 ((Can we date this quote by Holman Christian Standard Bible and provide title, author’s full name, and other details?))
      16 All your males are to appear three times a year before the Lord your God in the place He chooses: at the Festival of Unleavened Bread, the Festival of Weeks, and the Festival of Booths. No one is to appear before the Lord empty-handed.
  2. An event or community gathering, usually staged by a local community, which centers on some theme, sometimes on some unique aspect of the community.
  3. In mythology, a set of celebrations in the honour of a god.
  4. (Caribbean, Jamaican) fried cornbread

Related terms

  • festal
  • festive
  • festivity
  • festivities

Translations


Catalan

Pronunciation

  • (Balearic) IPA(key): /fəs.tiˈval/
  • (Central) IPA(key): /fəs.tiˈbal/
  • (Valencian) IPA(key): /fes.tiˈval/

Noun

festival m (plural festivals)

  1. festival

Czech

Etymology

From English festival

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ˈfɛstɪval]
  • Hyphenation: fe‧s‧ti‧val

Noun

festival m inan

  1. festival (an event or community gathering)

Declension

Further reading

  • festival in Příruční slovník jazyka českého, 1935–1957
  • festival in Slovník spisovného jazyka českého, 1960–1971, 1989

Dutch

Etymology

Borrowed from English festival, from Old French festival, from Late Latin fēstīvālis, from Latin fēstīvus (festive).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈfɛs.tiˌvɑl/
  • Hyphenation: fes‧ti‧val

Noun

festival n (plural festivals, diminutive festivalletje n)

  1. A festival (festive event or gathering).

Derived terms

  • dorpsfestival
  • festivalganger
  • festivalisering
  • festivalpubliek
  • filmfestival
  • kunstfestival
  • muziekfestival
  • songfestival
  • theaterfestival

French

Etymology

From English festival, from Old French festival.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /fɛs.ti.val/

Noun

festival m (plural festivals)

  1. festival

Further reading

  • “festival” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

Italian

Etymology

Borrowed from English festival.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈfɛs.ti.val/, (traditional) /fes.tiˈval/

Noun

festival m (invariable)

  1. festival
  2. worker’s festival

Synonyms

  • mostra
  • rassegna

Related terms

  • festivaliere
  • festivaliero

References


Norwegian Bokmål

Etymology

From Latin festivalis, via English festival

Noun

festival m (definite singular festivalen, indefinite plural festivaler, definite plural festivalene)

  1. a festival

References

  • “festival” in The Bokmål Dictionary.

Norwegian Nynorsk

Etymology

From Latin festivalis, via English festival

Noun

festival m (definite singular festivalen, indefinite plural festivalar, definite plural festivalane)

  1. a festival

References

  • “festival” in The Nynorsk Dictionary.

Portuguese

Etymology

From French festival, ultimately from Latin fēstīvālis.

Pronunciation

  • (Portugal) IPA(key): /fəʃ.tiˈval/

Noun

festival m (plural festivais)

  1. festival

Romanian

Etymology

From French festival.

Noun

festival n (plural festivaluri)

  1. festival

Declension


Serbo-Croatian

Noun

festìvāl m (Cyrillic spelling фестѝва̄л)

  1. festival

Declension

See also

  • praznik

Spanish

Noun

festival m (plural festivales)

  1. festival

Turkish

Etymology

Borrowed from French festival.

Noun

festival (definite accusative festivali, plural festivaller)

  1. festival

Synonyms

  • şenlik


English

Alternative forms

  • fête

Etymology

Borrowed from French fête. Doublet of feast and fiesta.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /feɪt/, /fɛt/
  • AHD: /fāt/, /fet/
  • Homophones: fate
  • Rhymes: -eɪt, -ɛt

Noun

fete (plural fetes)

  1. A festival open to the public, the proceeds from which are often given to charity.
    • 1991, Treasure Hunting, Treasure Hunting Publications:
      The final fete of the year was held at the Plymouth Hoe on 20 July, where fine weather and crowds of people ensured much support for local charities and boosted club finds.
  2. A feast, celebration or carnival.

Translations

Verb

fete (third-person singular simple present fetes, present participle feting, simple past and past participle feted)

  1. (transitive, usually in the passive) To celebrate (a person).
    Synonym: celebrate
    • 1992, Today, News Group Newspapers Ltd:
      Danielle Salamon was also four when she was feted as a musical genius in 1953.

Translations

Anagrams

  • ETFE, feet, teef

Latin

Adjective

fēte

  1. vocative masculine singular of fētus

Neapolitan

Etymology

From Latin fēteō

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /fɛtə/

Verb

fete

  1. to smell bad, to stink

Norwegian Bokmål

Adjective

fete

  1. definite singular of fet
  2. plural of fet

Romanian

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ˈfe.te]

Noun

fete f pl

  1. plural of fată

Swedish

Adjective

fete

  1. absolute definite natural masculine singular of fet.

Please follow and like us:

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Social Share Buttons and Icons powered by Ultimatelysocial