fetch vs get what difference

what is difference between fetch and get

English

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation, General American) enPR: fĕch, IPA(key): /fɛtʃ/
  • Rhymes: -ɛtʃ

Etymology 1

The verb is derived from Middle English fecchen (to get and bring back, fetch; to come for, get and take away; to steal; to carry away to kill; to search for; to obtain, procure)  [and other forms], from Old English feċċan, fæċċan, feccean (to fetch, bring; to draw; to gain, take; to seek), a variant of fetian, fatian (to bring near, fetch; to acquire, obtain; to bring on, induce; to fetch a wife, marry) and possibly related to Old English facian, fācian (to acquire, obtain; to try to obtain; to get; to get to, reach), both from Proto-Germanic *fatōną, *fatjaną (to hold, seize; to fetch), from Proto-Indo-European *ped- (to step, walk; to fall, stumble). The English word is cognate with Dutch vatten (to apprehend, catch; to grasp; to understand), English fet ((obsolete) to fetch), Faroese fata (to grasp, understand), Swedish fatta (to grasp, understand), German fassen (to catch, grasp; to capture, seize), Icelandic feta (to go, step), West Frisian fetsje (to grasp).

The noun is derived from the verb.

Verb

fetch (third-person singular simple present fetches, present participle fetching, simple past and past participle fetched)

  1. To retrieve; to bear towards; to go and get.
    • 1611 King James Bible, 1 Kings xvii. 11, 12
      He called to her, and said, Fetch me, I pray thee, a little water in a vessel, that I may drink.
    • 1908, Kenneth Grahame, The Wind in the Willows
      When they got home, the Rat made a bright fire in the parlour, and planted the Mole in an arm-chair in front of it, having fetched down a dressing-gown and slippers for him, and told him river stories till supper-time.
  2. To obtain as price or equivalent; to sell for.
  3. (nautical) To bring or get within reach by going; to reach; to arrive at; to attain; to reach by sailing.
  4. (intransitive) To bring oneself; to make headway; to veer; as, to fetch about; to fetch to windward.
  5. (rare, literary) To take (a breath), to heave (a sigh)
  6. To cause to come; to bring to a particular state.
    • 1879, William Barnes, A Witch
      They couldn’t fetch the butter in the churn.
  7. (obsolete) To recall from a swoon; to revive; sometimes with to.
  8. To reduce; to throw.
    • 1692, Robert South, sermon 28
      The sudden trip in wrestling that fetches a man to the ground.
  9. (archaic) To accomplish; to achieve; to perform, with certain objects or actions.
    • 1631, Ben Jonsons, Chloridia
      Ixion [] turn’d dancer, does nothing but cut capreols, fetch friskals, and leads lavaltoes
    • 1692, Robert South, sermon 28
      He fetches his blow quick and sure.
  10. (nautical, transitive) To make (a pump) draw water by pouring water into the top and working the handle.

Conjugation

Alternative forms

  • fatch, fotch (dialectal)

Derived terms

Translations

Noun

fetch (plural fetches)

  1. (also figuratively) An act of fetching, of bringing something from a distance.
    1. (computing, specifically) An act of fetching data.
  2. The object of fetching; the source of an attraction; a force, propensity, or quality which attracts.
  3. A stratagem or trick; an artifice.
    Synonyms: contrivance, dodge
    • 1665, Robert South, “Jesus of Nazareth proved the true and only promised Messiah”, in Twelve Sermons Preached Upon Several Occasions, Volume 3, 6th Edition, 1727:
      Every little fetch of wit and criticism.
    • 1748, Samuel Richardson, Clarissa, Letter 29:
      And as to your cant of living single, nobody will believe you. This is one of your fetches to avoid complying with your duty […].

Interjection

fetch

  1. (Utah) Minced oath for fuck
References
  • 20 Things Only Utahns Will Understand And Appreciate

Etymology 2

Origin uncertain; the following possibilities have been suggested:

  • From fetch-life ((obsolete, rare) a deity, spirit, etc., who guides the soul of a dead person to the afterlife; a psychopomp).
  • From the supposed Old English *fæcce (evil spirit formerly thought to sit on the chest of a sleeping person; a mare).
  • From Old Irish fáith (seer, soothsayer).

Noun

fetch (plural fetches)

  1. (originally Ireland, dialectal) The apparition of a living person; a person’s double, the sight of which is supposedly a sign that they are fated to die soon, a doppelganger; a wraith (a person’s likeness seen just after their death; a ghost, a spectre). [from 18th c.]

Derived terms

  • fetch candle

Translations

References

Further reading

  • fetch (folklore) on Wikipedia.Wikipedia
  • fetch (disambiguation) on Wikipedia.Wikipedia

Anagrams

  • Fecht


English

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɡɛt/, /ɡɪt/
  • Rhymes: -ɛt

Etymology 1

From Middle English geten, from Old Norse geta, from Proto-Germanic *getaną (compare Old English ġietan, Old High German pigezzan (to uphold), Gothic ???????????????????????????? (bigitan, to find, discover)), from Proto-Indo-European *gʰed- (to seize).

Verb

get (third-person singular simple present gets, present participle getting, simple past got or (archaic) gat, past participle gotten or (England, Australia, New Zealand) got or (Geordie) getten)

  1. (ditransitive) To obtain; to acquire.
  2. (transitive) To receive.
  3. (transitive, in a perfect construction, with present-tense meaning) To have. See usage notes.
  4. (transitive) To fetch, bring, take.
    • Get thee out from this land.
  5. (copulative) To become, or cause oneself to become.
    • November 1, 1833, Samuel Taylor Coleridge, Table Talk
      His chariot wheels get hot by driving fast.
  6. (transitive) To cause to become; to bring about.
  7. (transitive) To cause to do.
  8. (transitive) To cause to come or go or move.
  9. (intransitive, with various prepositions, such as into, over, or behind; for specific idiomatic senses see individual entries get into, get over, etc.) To adopt, assume, arrive at, or progress towards (a certain position, location, state).
  10. (transitive) To cover (a certain distance) while travelling.
  11. (intransitive) To begin (doing something or to do something).
  12. (transitive) To take or catch (a scheduled transportation service).
  13. (transitive) To respond to (a telephone call, a doorbell, etc).
  14. (intransitive, followed by infinitive) To be able, be permitted, or have the opportunity (to do something desirable or ironically implied to be desirable).
  15. (transitive, informal) To understand. (compare get it)
  16. (transitive, informal) To be told; be the recipient of (a question, comparison, opinion, etc.).
  17. (informal) To be. Used to form the passive of verbs.
  18. (transitive) To become ill with or catch (a disease).
  19. (transitive, informal) To catch out, trick successfully.
  20. (transitive, informal) To perplex, stump.
  21. (transitive) To find as an answer.
  22. (transitive, informal) To bring to reckoning; to catch (as a criminal); to effect retribution.
  23. (transitive) To hear completely; catch.
  24. (transitive) To getter.
  25. (now rare) To beget (of a father).
    • 2009, Hilary Mantel, Wolf Hall, Fourth Estate 2010, page 310:
      Walter had said, dear God, Thomas, it was St fucking Felicity if I’m not mistaken, and her face was to the wall for sure the night I got you.
  26. (archaic) To learn; to commit to memory; to memorize; sometimes with out.
  27. (imperative, informal) Used with a personal pronoun to indicate that someone is being pretentious or grandiose.
    • 1966, Dorothy Fields, If My Friends Could See Me Now (song)
      Brother, get her! Draped on a bedspread made from three kinds of fur!
    • 2007, Tom Dyckhoff, Let’s move to …, The Guardian:
      Money’s pouring in somewhere, because Churchgate’s got lovely new stone setts, and a cultural quarter (ooh, get her) is promised.
  28. (intransitive, informal, chiefly imperative) To go, to leave; to scram.
    • 1991, Theodore Dreiser, T. D. Nostwich, Newspaper Days, University of Pennsylvania Press →ISBN, page 663
      Get, now — get! — before I call an officer and lay a charge against ye.
    • 1952, Fredric Brown and Mack Reynolds, Me and Flapjack and the Martians
      I had a sneaking suspicion that it wasn’t no flashlight and I wasn’t too curious, just then, to find out what would happen if he did more than wave it at me, so I got. I went back about twenty feet or so and watched.
    • 2010, Sarah Webb, The Loving Kind, Pan Macmillan →ISBN:
      ‘Go on, get. You look a state. We can’t let Leo see you like that.’
    • 2012, Paul Zindel, Ladies at the Alamo, Graymalkin Media (→ISBN):
      Now go on, get! Get! Get! (she chases Joanne out the door with the hammer.)
    • 2016, April Daniels, Dreadnought, Diversion Books (→ISBN):
      [] and then I’ll switch over to the police band to know when the bacon’s getting ready to stick its nose in. When I tell you to get, you get, understand?” Calamity asks as she retapes the earbud into her ear.
  29. (euphemistic) To kill.
    They’re coming to get you, Barbara.
  30. (intransitive, obsolete) To make acquisitions; to gain; to profit.
  31. (transitive) To measure.
Usage notes
  • The meaning “to have” is found only in perfect tenses but has present meaning; hence “I have got” has the same meaning as “I have”. (Sometimes the form had got is used to mean “had”, as in “He said they couldn’t find the place because they’d got the wrong address”.) In speech and in all except formal writing, the word “have” is normally reduced to /v/ and spelled “-‘ve” or dropped entirely (e.g. “I got a God-fearing woman, one I can easily afford”, Slow Train, Bob Dylan), leading to nonstandard usages such as “he gots” = “he has”, “he doesn’t got” = “he doesn’t have”.
  • Some dialects (e.g. American English dialects) use both gotten and got as past participles, while others (e.g. dialects of Southern England) use only got. In dialects that use both, got is used for the meanings “to have” and “to have to”, while gotten is used for all other meanings. This allows for a distinction between “I’ve gotten a ticket” (I have received or obtained a ticket) vs. “I’ve got a ticket” (I currently have a ticket).
  • “get” is one of the most common verbs in English, and the many meanings may be confusing for language learners. The following table indicates some of the different constructions found, along with the most common meanings of each:
Synonyms
  • (obtain): acquire, come by, have
  • (receive): receive, be given
  • (fetch): bring, fetch, retrieve
  • (become): become
  • (cause to become): cause to be, cause to become, make
  • (cause to do): make
  • (arrive): arrive at, reach
  • (go, leave): get out go, leave, scram
  • (adopt or assume (a position or state)): go, move
  • (begin): begin, commence, start
  • (catch (a means of public transport)): catch, take
  • (respond to (telephone, doorbell)): answer
  • (be able to; have the opportunity to do): be able to
  • (informal: understand): dig, follow, make sense of, understand
  • (informal: be (used to form the passive)): be
  • (informal: catch (a disease)): catch, come down with
  • (informal: trick): con, deceive, dupe, hoodwink, trick
  • (informal: perplex): confuse, perplex, stump
  • (find as an answer): obtain
  • (bring to reckoning; to catch (as a criminal)): catch, nab, nobble
  • (physically assault): assault, beat, beat up
  • (informal: hear): catch, hear
  • (getter): getter
Antonyms
  • (obtain): lose
Derived terms
Related terms
  • guess
Translations

Noun

get (plural gets)

  1. (dated) Offspring.
    • 1810, Thomas Hornby Morland, The genealogy of the English race horse (page 71)
      At the time when I am making these observations, one of his colts is the first favourite for the Derby; and it will be recollected, that a filly of his get won the Oaks in 1808.
    • 1999, George RR Martin, A Clash of Kings, Bantam 2011, page 755:
      ‘You were a high lord’s get. Don’t tell me Lord Eddard Stark of Winterfell never killed a man.’
  2. Lineage.
  3. (sports, tennis) A difficult return or block of a shot.
  4. (informal) Something gained; an acquisition.

Etymology 2

Variant of git.

Noun

get (plural gets)

  1. (Britain, regional) A git.

Etymology 3

From Hebrew גֵּט(gēṭ).

Noun

get (plural gets or gittim or gitten)

  1. (Judaism) A Jewish writ of divorce.
    • 2013, Dan Cohn-Sherbok, ‎George D. Chryssides, ‎Dawoud El-Alami, Love, Sex and Marriage (page 143)
      In Israel, rabbinic courts can imprison men until they acquiesce and grant gets to their wives.
Alternative forms
  • gett
Quotations
  • For quotations using this term, see Citations:get.

References

  • get at OneLook Dictionary Search
  • get in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.

Anagrams

  • GTE, TGE, teg

Icelandic

Verb

get

  1. inflection of geta:
    1. first-person singular present indicative
    2. singular imperative

Ladino

Etymology

From Hebrew גט‎.

Noun

get m (Latin spelling)

  1. divorce

Limburgish

Etymology

From Middle Dutch iewet, iet. The diphthong /ie̯/ developed into /je/ word-initially, as it did in High German, and the onset was then enclitically hardened to ⟨g⟩ (/ʝ/). Cognate with Dutch iets, Central Franconian jet, northern Luxembourgish jett, gett, English aught.

Pronoun

get

  1. something

Mauritian Creole

Verb

get

  1. Medial form of gete

Middle English

Alternative forms

  • geet, gete, jet, gette, geete, jete, jeete

Etymology

From a northern form of Old French jayet, jaiet, gaiet, from Latin gagātēs, from Ancient Greek Γαγάτης (Gagátēs).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /dʒɛːt/, /dʒɛt/

Noun

get (uncountable)

  1. jet, hardened coal
  2. A bead made of jet.
  3. A jet-black pigment.

Descendants

  • English: jet

References

  • “ǧē̆t, n.(2).”, in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007, retrieved 2018-04-24.

Old Norse

Etymology

From geta.

Noun

get n

  1. (rare) a guess

Declension

Verb

get

  1. first-person singular present indicative of geta
  2. second-person singular imperative of geta

References

  • get in Geir T. Zoëga (1910) A Concise Dictionary of Old Icelandic, Oxford: Clarendon Press

Old Swedish

Etymology

From Old Norse geit, from Proto-Germanic *gaits.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ʝeːt/

Noun

gēt f

  1. goat

Declension

Descendants

  • Swedish: get

Romanian

Etymology

From French Gétes, Latin Getae, from Ancient Greek.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /d͡ʒet/
  • Rhymes: -et

Noun

get m (plural geți, feminine equivalent getă)

  1. Get, one of the Getae, Greek name for the Dacian people

Synonyms

  • dac

Swedish

Etymology

From Old Swedish gēt, from Old Norse geit, from Proto-Germanic *gaits, from Proto-Indo-European *gʰayd- (goat).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /jeːt/

Noun

get c

  1. goat

Declension

Anagrams

  • teg

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