fetching vs taking what difference

what is difference between fetching and taking

English

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈfɛtʃɪŋ/
  • Rhymes: -ɛtʃɪŋ
  • Hyphenation: fetch‧ing

Etymology 1

From fetch +‎ -ing.

Adjective

fetching (comparative more fetching, superlative most fetching)

  1. Attractive; pleasant to regard.
    Synonyms: see Thesaurus:attractive
Translations

Verb

fetching

  1. present participle of fetch

Etymology 2

From Middle English fetchynge, fecchynge, faching, fettynge, equivalent to fetch +‎ -ing.

Noun

fetching (plural fetchings)

  1. The act by which something is fetched.
    • 1834, Evidence on drunkenness: presented to the House of Commons
      These lumpers were also in the habit of inducing their men during the week to send to their pay-house for fetchings of drink, besides the money they were compelled to spend on Saturday night.


English

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈteɪkɪŋ/
  • Rhymes: -eɪkɪŋ

Adjective

taking (comparative more taking, superlative most taking)

  1. Alluring; attractive.
    • 1655, Thomas Fuller, The Church-History of Britain from the Birth of Jesus Christ until the Year M.DC.XLVIII, London: John Williams, “The Tenth Century,” p. 128,[1]
      [] a Proteus-Devil appeared unto him, changing into Shapes, but fixing himself at last into the form of a Fair Woman. Strange, that Satan (so subtil in making his Temptations most taking) should preferre this form []
    • 1793, Charles Dibdin, The Younger Brother, London, for the author, Volume 2, Chapter 9, p. 263,[2]
      His speech from the hustings was very original, and therefore very taking.
    • 1878, Thomas Hardy, The Return of the Native, Book 3, Chapter 1,[3]
      “Yes, Paris must be a taking place,” said Humphrey. “Grand shop-winders, trumpets, and drums; and here be we out of doors in all winds and weathers—”
  2. (obsolete) Infectious; contagious.
    • c. 1605, William Shakespeare, King Lear, Act II, Scene 4,[4]
      All the stor’d vengeances of heaven fall
      On her ingrateful top! Strike her young bones,
      You taking airs, with lameness!
    • 1647, John Fletcher and Philip Massinger, The False One, Act IV, Scene 3,[5]
      Come not near me,
      For I am yet too taking for your company.

Derived terms

  • takingly
  • takingness

Translations

Noun

taking (countable and uncountable, plural takings)

  1. The act by which something is taken.
    • 1900, Joseph Conrad, Lord Jim, Edinburgh and London: William Blackwood, Chapter 27,p. 290,[6]
      At the taking of the stockade he had distinguished himself greatly by the methodical ferocity of his fighting.
  2. (uncountable) A seizure of someone’s goods or possessions.
  3. (uncountable) A state of mental distress, resulting in excited or erratic behavior (in the expression in a taking).
    • 1874, Thomas Hardy, Far from the Madding Crowd, Chapter 30,[7]
      “And, dear miss, you won’t harry me and storm at me, will you? because you seem to swell so tall as a lion then, and it frightens me! Do you know, I fancy you would be a match for any man when you are in one o’ your takings.”
    • 1970, Mary Stewart, The Crystal Cave, New York: Fawcett Crest, Book 1, Chapter 2, p. 26,[8]
      “[…] there’ll be a beating for someone, by my reckoning, if he’s not there by the time the King’s looking round for him. He’s been in a rare taking since the outriders came in, that I can tell you.”
  4. (in the plural) Cash or money received (by a shop or other business, for example).
    Synonyms: income, receipts
    Fred was concerned because the takings from his sweetshop had fallen again for the third week.
    Count the shop’s takings.
    • 1929, Virginia Woolf, A Room of One’s Own, London: The Hogarth Press, 1931, Chapter 2, p. 60,[9]
      […] the woman who keeps the greengrocer’s shop was adding up the day’s takings with her hands in red mittens.
    • 1995, Rohinton Mistry, A Fine Balance, Toronto: McClelland & Stewart, Chapter 12, pp. 554-555,[10]
      The child was not returned to the mother. […] strangers giving him suck found it easier to display the utter despair in their faces that made for successful begging, whereas if [the mother] had had the pleasure of clasping her little son to her bosom all day, it would have been impossible to keep a spark of joy, however tiny, out of her eyes, which would have adversely affected the takings.

Translations

Verb

taking

  1. present participle of take

Tagalog

Noun

taking

  1. (Taal Batangas) boy

Synonyms

  • itoy
  • toto
  • totoy
  • tuto

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