fetich vs fetish what difference

what is difference between fetich and fetish

English

Noun

fetich (plural fetiches)

  1. Dated form of fetish.
    • 1913: Walter Lippmann, A Preface to Politics, pages page 152 (2008 publication)
      The one thing that no democrat may assume is that the people are dear good souls, fully competent for their task. The most valuable leaders never assume that. No one, for example, would accuse Karl Marx of disloyalty to workingmen. Yet in 1850 he could write at the demagogues among his friends: “While we draw the attention of the German workman to the undeveloped state of the proletariat in Germany, you flatter the national spirit and the guild prejudices of the German artisans in the grossest manner, a method of procedure without doubt the more popular of the two. Just as the democrats made a sort of fetich of the words, ‘the people,’ so you make one of the word ‘proletariat.’” John Spargo quotes this statement in his “Life.” Marx, we are told, could use phrases like “democratic miasma.” He never seems to have made the mistake of confusing democracy with demolatry.

References

  • fetich” listed as a variant spelling, in use from the eighteenth century onward, of “fetish, n.”, listed in the Oxford English Dictionary [2nd Ed.; 1989]

Anagrams

  • chétif, fitché, hetfic


English

Alternative forms

  • fetich (dated [18th c.–present])

Etymology

Borrowed from French fétiche, from Portuguese feitiço, from Latin factīcius (artificial). Doublet of factitious.

Pronunciation

  • (UK, US) enPR: fĕtʹĭsh, fēʹtĭsh, IPA(key): /ˈfɛt.ɪʃ/, /ˈfiː.tɪʃ/

Noun

fetish (plural fetishes)

  1. Something which is believed to possess, contain, or cause spiritual or magical powers; an amulet or a talisman. [from the early 17th c.]
  2. Sexual attraction to or arousal at something abnormally sexual or nonsexual, such as an object or a nonsexual part of the body. [from the early 19th c.]
    Synonym: paraphilia
  3. An irrational, or abnormal fixation or preoccupation; an obsession. [from the 19th c.]
    • 1933, George Orwell, Down and Out in Paris and London (Harvest / Harcourt paperback edition), chapter XXII, page 117:
      We have a feeling that it must be “honest” work, because it is hard and disagreeable, and we have made a sort of fetish of manual work.

Derived terms

  • fet
  • fetishism
  • fetishist
  • fetishistic
  • fetishize
  • fetishlike
  • fetishwear

Translations

Anagrams

  • feiths, thiefs

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