fetish vs voodoo what difference

what is difference between fetish and voodoo

English

Alternative forms

  • fetich (dated [18th c.–present])

Etymology

Borrowed from French fétiche, from Portuguese feitiço, from Latin factīcius (artificial). Doublet of factitious.

Pronunciation

  • (UK, US) enPR: fĕtʹĭsh, fēʹtĭsh, IPA(key): /ˈfɛt.ɪʃ/, /ˈfiː.tɪʃ/

Noun

fetish (plural fetishes)

  1. Something which is believed to possess, contain, or cause spiritual or magical powers; an amulet or a talisman. [from the early 17th c.]
  2. Sexual attraction to or arousal at something abnormally sexual or nonsexual, such as an object or a nonsexual part of the body. [from the early 19th c.]
    Synonym: paraphilia
  3. An irrational, or abnormal fixation or preoccupation; an obsession. [from the 19th c.]
    • 1933, George Orwell, Down and Out in Paris and London (Harvest / Harcourt paperback edition), chapter XXII, page 117:
      We have a feeling that it must be “honest” work, because it is hard and disagreeable, and we have made a sort of fetish of manual work.

Derived terms

  • fet
  • fetishism
  • fetishist
  • fetishistic
  • fetishize
  • fetishlike
  • fetishwear

Translations

Anagrams

  • feiths, thiefs


English

Etymology

From Louisiana Creole French voudou, from Haitian Creole vodou, from a West African language, such as Ewe vódũ (deity, idol), Fon vòdún (fetish).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈvuːduː/

Noun

voodoo (countable and uncountable, plural voodoos)

  1. Any of a group of related religious practices found chiefly in and around the Caribbean, particularly in Haiti and Louisiana.
    • 2007, Kevin Filan, The Haitian Vodou Handbook, Destiny Books 2007, p. 13:
      You cannot understand Haitian Vodou as it is practised today without first knowing something about the culture from which it sprang, and the ways history has shaped religion, and vice versa.
  2. The spiritual beliefs of the Ewe/Fon of West Africa, practiced chiefly in Benin and in the south of Togo.
  3. (derogatory) Any sort of magical or irrational approach to a problem.
    I want a real explanation, not this statistical voodoo.
  4. (dated) One who practices voodoo; a native sorcerer.
    • 1889, Longman’s Magazine (volume 14, page 557)
      So a reporter of the Boston Herald (U.S.) has ‘interviewed’ a few local Voodoos. He has seen a dance round a boiling pot, seen some tomfoolery with spiders, and heard a lot of superstitious stories.

Alternative forms

  • (religion of Africa or the Americas): vodou, vodoun, voudon, voudoun, vodun, voudou, Voodoo

Synonyms

  • (religion): voodooism

Derived terms

Translations

Verb

voodoo (third-person singular simple present voodoos, present participle voodooing, simple past and past participle voodooed)

  1. To bewitch someone or something using voodoo
    He claimed his neighbor had voodooed him.

See also

  • hoodoo
  • Haitian Vodou on Wikipedia.Wikipedia
  • West African Vodun on Wikipedia.Wikipedia

Finnish

Noun

voodoo

  1. voodoo

Declension


Italian

Noun

voodoo m (invariable)

  1. Alternative spelling of vudù

Adjective

voodoo (invariable)

  1. Alternative spelling of vudù

Norwegian Bokmål

Etymology

From English voodoo, from Louisiana Creole French voudou, from Haitian Creole vodou, from a West African language.

Noun

voodoo m (definite singular voodooen, indefinite plural voodooer, definite plural voodooene)

  1. voodoo

References

  • “voodoo” in The Bokmål Dictionary.

Norwegian Nynorsk

Etymology

From English voodoo, from Louisiana Creole French voudou, from Haitian Creole vodou, from a West African language.

Noun

voodoo m (definite singular voodooen, indefinite plural voodooar, definite plural voodooane)

  1. voodoo

References

  • “voodoo” in The Nynorsk Dictionary.

Polish

Alternative forms

  • wudu

Etymology

From English voodoo, from Louisiana Creole French voudou, from Haitian Creole vodou, from a West African language.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈvu.du/

Noun

voodoo n (indeclinable)

  1. voodoo (Afro-Caribbean religion)

Further reading

  • voodoo in Wielki słownik języka polskiego, Instytut Języka Polskiego PAN
  • voodoo in Polish dictionaries at PWN

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