fetter vs hobble what difference

what is difference between fetter and hobble

English

Etymology

From Old English feter, from Proto-Germanic *feturaz (fetter), from Proto-Indo-European *ped- (foot, step). Cognate with Dutch veter (lace). Related to foot.

Pronunciation

  • (General Australian) IPA(key): /ˈfet.ə/
  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /ˈfɛt.ə/
  • (US) IPA(key): /ˈfɛt.ɚ/
  • Rhymes: -ɛtə(r)

Noun

fetter (plural fetters)

  1. A chain or similar object used to bind a person or animal – often by its legs (usually in plural).
  2. (figuratively) Anything that restricts or restrains.

Synonyms

(chains on legs):

  • leg irons

Hyponyms

(chain binding generally):

  • handcuff, handcuffs
  • leg irons
  • manacle, manacles
  • shackle, shackles

Translations

Verb

fetter (third-person singular simple present fetters, present participle fettering, simple past and past participle fettered)

  1. (transitive) To shackle or bind up with fetters.
  2. (transitive) To restrain or impede; to hamper.

Hyponyms

  • handcuff
  • manacle
  • shackle

Derived terms

  • unfetter

Translations


German

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ˈfɛtɐ]
  • Homophone: Vetter

Adjective

fetter

  1. comparative degree of fett
  2. inflection of fett:
    1. strong/mixed nominative masculine singular
    2. strong genitive/dative feminine singular
    3. strong genitive plural

Norwegian Bokmål

Etymology

From Middle Low German vedder

Noun

fetter m (definite singular fetteren, indefinite plural fettere, definite plural fetterne)

  1. a cousin (male)

Antonyms

  • kusine

References

  • “fetter” in The Bokmål Dictionary.

Norwegian Nynorsk

Etymology

From Middle Low German vedder.

Noun

fetter m (definite singular fetteren, indefinite plural fetrar, definite plural fetrane)

  1. a male cousin

Coordinate terms

  • kusine f (female cousin)

References

  • “fetter” in The Nynorsk Dictionary.

Swedish

Noun

fetter

  1. indefinite plural of fett

Vilamovian

Pronunciation

  • Hyphenation: fet‧ter

Noun

fetter m (plural fettyn)

  1. paternal uncle (brother of someone’s father)


English

Etymology

From Middle English hobblen, hobelen, akin to Middle Dutch hoblen, hobbelen (Modern Dutch hobbelen).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈhɒbəl/
  • Rhymes: -ɒbəl

Noun

hobble (plural hobbles)

  1. (chiefly in the plural) One of the short straps tied between the legs of unfenced horses, allowing them to wander short distances but preventing them from running off.
  2. An unsteady, off-balance step.
  3. (archaic, informal) A difficult situation; a scrape.
    • 1845, Joseph Sheridan Le Fanu, The Cock and Anchor
      “Saddle a horse—any horse—only let him be sure and fleet,” cried Ashwoode, “and I’ll pay you his price thrice over!”
      “Well, it’s a bargain,” replied the groom, promptly; “I don’t like to see a gentleman caught in a hobble, if I can help him out of it. []
  4. (dialect, Britain and Newfoundland) An odd job; a piece of casual work.

Synonyms

  • tether (rope)

Translations

Verb

hobble (third-person singular simple present hobbles, present participle hobbling, simple past and past participle hobbled)

  1. To fetter by tying the legs; to restrict (a horse) with hobbles.
    • 1865, Charles Dickens, Doctor Marigold
      you hobble your old horse and turn him grazing
  2. To walk lame, or unevenly.
    • The friar was hobbling the same way too.
  3. (figuratively) To move roughly or irregularly.
    • 1815, William Wordsworth, The White Doe of Rylstone
      The hobbling versification, the mean diction.
  4. To perplex; to embarrass.

Synonyms

  • (walk unevenly): hirple

Derived terms

  • hobble skirt
  • hobbly
  • unhobble

Translations

Anagrams

  • hobbel

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