fetter vs shackle what difference

what is difference between fetter and shackle

English

Etymology

From Old English feter, from Proto-Germanic *feturaz (fetter), from Proto-Indo-European *ped- (foot, step). Cognate with Dutch veter (lace). Related to foot.

Pronunciation

  • (General Australian) IPA(key): /ˈfet.ə/
  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /ˈfɛt.ə/
  • (US) IPA(key): /ˈfɛt.ɚ/
  • Rhymes: -ɛtə(r)

Noun

fetter (plural fetters)

  1. A chain or similar object used to bind a person or animal – often by its legs (usually in plural).
  2. (figuratively) Anything that restricts or restrains.

Synonyms

(chains on legs):

  • leg irons

Hyponyms

(chain binding generally):

  • handcuff, handcuffs
  • leg irons
  • manacle, manacles
  • shackle, shackles

Translations

Verb

fetter (third-person singular simple present fetters, present participle fettering, simple past and past participle fettered)

  1. (transitive) To shackle or bind up with fetters.
  2. (transitive) To restrain or impede; to hamper.

Hyponyms

  • handcuff
  • manacle
  • shackle

Derived terms

  • unfetter

Translations


German

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ˈfɛtɐ]
  • Homophone: Vetter

Adjective

fetter

  1. comparative degree of fett
  2. inflection of fett:
    1. strong/mixed nominative masculine singular
    2. strong genitive/dative feminine singular
    3. strong genitive plural

Norwegian Bokmål

Etymology

From Middle Low German vedder

Noun

fetter m (definite singular fetteren, indefinite plural fettere, definite plural fetterne)

  1. a cousin (male)

Antonyms

  • kusine

References

  • “fetter” in The Bokmål Dictionary.

Norwegian Nynorsk

Etymology

From Middle Low German vedder.

Noun

fetter m (definite singular fetteren, indefinite plural fetrar, definite plural fetrane)

  1. a male cousin

Coordinate terms

  • kusine f (female cousin)

References

  • “fetter” in The Nynorsk Dictionary.

Swedish

Noun

fetter

  1. indefinite plural of fett

Vilamovian

Pronunciation

  • Hyphenation: fet‧ter

Noun

fetter m (plural fettyn)

  1. paternal uncle (brother of someone’s father)


English

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈʃækəl/
  • Rhymes: -ækəl

Etymology 1

From Middle English schakkyl, schakle, from Old English sċeacel, sċeacul, sċacul (shackle, bond, fetter), from Proto-West Germanic *skakul, from Proto-Germanic *skakulaz (shackle), from Proto-Indo-European *skeg-, *skek- (to jump, move, shake, stir), equivalent to shake +‎ -le. Cognate with Dutch schakel (link, shackle, clasp), German Schäckel (shackle), Danish skagle (a carriage trace), Swedish skakel (the loose shaft of a carriage), Icelandic skökull (a carriage pole).

Noun

shackle (plural shackles)

  1. (usually in the plural) A restraint fit over a human or animal appendage, such as a wrist, ankle or finger; normally used in pairs joined by a chain.
    Synonym: hobble
    Hyponyms: handcuff, manacle, fetter
  2. A U-shaped piece of metal secured with a pin or bolt across the opening, or a hinged metal loop secured with a quick-release locking pin mechanism.
    Coordinate term: clevis
  3. (figuratively, usually in the plural) A restraint on one’s action, activity, or progress.
    • His very will seems to be in bonds and shackles.
  4. A fetter-like band worn as an ornament.
    • 1697, William Dampier, A New Voyage Round the World
      Most of the men and women [] had all earrings made of gold, and gold shackles about their legs and arms.
  5. A link for connecting railroad cars; a drawlink or draglink.
  6. A length of cable or chain equal to 12+12 fathoms or 75 feet, or later to 15 fathoms.
  7. (Can we verify(+) this sense?) Stubble.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Pegge to this entry?)
Derived terms
  • harp shackle
  • H-shackle
  • shackleless
Translations

Further reading

  • shackle on Wikipedia.Wikipedia

Etymology 2

From Middle English schakelen, schakkylen, from the noun (see above).

Verb

shackle (third-person singular simple present shackles, present participle shackling, simple past and past participle shackled)

  1. (transitive) To restrain using shackles; to place in shackles.
  2. (transitive, by extension) To render immobile or incapable; to inhibit the progress or abilities of.
Antonyms
  • (to restrain using shackles): unshackle, untie
  • (to inhibit the abilities of): free, liberate, unshackle
Translations

Etymology 3

From shack (shake) +‎ -le.

Verb

shackle (third-person singular simple present shackles, present participle shackling, simple past and past participle shackled)

  1. (dialectal) To shake, rattle.

Anagrams

  • Kachels, hackles

Scots

Etymology

From Old English sceacel, sceacul, scacul (shackle, bond, fetter), from Proto-Germanic *skakulaz (shackle), from Proto-Indo-European *skeg-, *skek- (to jump, move, shake, stir).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ʃakl], [ʃekl]

Noun

shackle (plural shackles)

  1. shackle, fetter, manacle
  2. (anatomy) wrist

Derived terms

  • shackle-bane (wrist)

Verb

shackle (third-person singular present shackles, present participle shacklin, past shackelt, past participle shackelt)

  1. to shackle

Please follow and like us:

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Social Share Buttons and Icons powered by Ultimatelysocial