feudatory vs liege what difference

what is difference between feudatory and liege

English

Alternative forms

  • feodatory (17 th century)

Etymology

From the Latin feudātōrius, from the Mediaeval Latin feudāre (to enfeoff), from feudum, feodum.

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) enPR: fyo͞oʹdətərĭ, IPA(key): /ˈfjuːdətəɹɪ/

Adjective

feudatory (not comparable)

  1. Relating to feudalism, feudal.

Related terms

  • feudatory state

Translations

Noun

feudatory (plural feudatories)

  1. A feudal vassal.
  2. A feudal territory, a fief.
    • 2016, Peter H. Wilson, The Holy Roman Empire, Penguin 2017, p. 587:
      Henry VII granted a privilege in 1309 endorsing the three valleys as self-governing rural feudatories forming their own imperial bailiwick directly under him.
  3. A fee paid by such a vassal to hold land.

References

  • feudatory, a. and n.” listed in the Oxford English Dictionary [2nd Ed.; 1989]


English

Etymology

From Middle English liege, lege, lige, from Anglo-Norman lige, from Old French liege (liege, free), from Middle High German ledic, ledec (free, empty, vacant) (Modern German ledig (unmarried)) from Proto-Germanic *liþugaz (flexible, free, unoccupied).

Akin to Old Frisian leþeg, leþoch (free), Old English liþiġ (flexible), Old Norse liðugr (free, unhindered), Old Saxon lethig (idle), Low German leddig (empty), Middle Dutch ledich (idle, unemployed) (Dutch ledig (empty) and leeg (empty)), Middle English lethi (unoccupied, at leisure).

An alternate etymology traces the Old French word to Late Latin laeticus (of or relating to a semifree colonist in Gaul), from laetus (a semi-free colonist), from Gothic *???????????????? (*lēts) (attested in derivatives such as ???????????????????????????? (fralēts)), from Proto-Germanic *lētaz (freeman; bondsman, serf), from Proto-Germanic *lētaną (to let; free; release).

Pronunciation

  • (UK, General American) IPA(key): /liːdʒ/, /liːʒ/
  • Rhymes: -iːdʒ, -iːʒ

Noun

liege (plural lieges)

  1. A free and independent person; specifically, a lord paramount; a sovereign.
  2. (in full liege lord) A king or lord.
  3. The subject of a sovereign or lord; a liegeman.

Translations

Adjective

liege (not comparable)

  1. Sovereign; independent; having authority or right to allegiance.
  2. Serving an independent sovereign or master; bound by a feudal tenure; obliged to be faithful and loyal to a superior, such as a vassal to his lord; faithful.
  3. (obsolete, law) Full; perfect; complete; pure.

Translations

Related terms

  • liege lord
  • liegeman

Dutch

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈli.ɣə/

Verb

liege

  1. (archaic) singular present subjunctive of liegen

German

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈliː.ɡə/

Verb

liege

  1. first-person singular indicative present of liegen
  2. first-person singular subjunctive present of liegen
  3. third-person singular subjunctive present of liegen

Middle English

Etymology 1

Borrowed from Late Latin leuca, leuga.

Noun

liege

  1. Alternative form of lege (league)

Etymology 2

Borrowed from Anglo-Norman lige.

Noun

liege

  1. Alternative form of lege (liege)

Adjective

liege

  1. Alternative form of lege (adjective)

Pennsylvania German

Etymology

From Middle High German liegen, from Old High German liogan, from Proto-West Germanic *leugan. Compare German lügen, Dutch liegen, English lie.

Verb

liege

  1. to tell a lie

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