feverish vs hectic what difference

what is difference between feverish and hectic

English

Etymology

From fever +‎ -ish.

Pronunciation

  • (UK) IPA(key): /ˈfiː.və.ɹɪʃ/
  • (US) IPA(key): /ˈfi.vɚ.ɪʃ/

Adjective

feverish (comparative more feverish, superlative most feverish)

  1. Having a fever, an elevated body temperature.
    The illness made him feverish, so they applied cold compresses.
  2. Filled with excess energy.
    He worked with feverish excitement.
  3. Morbidly eager.
    a feverish desire to see her again

Derived terms

Translations

Further reading

  • feverish in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.
  • feverish in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.


English

Alternative forms

  • hectick (obsolete)
  • hectical (archaic)

Etymology

From Middle English etik, ethik, from Old French etique, from Medieval Latin *hecticus, from Ancient Greek ἑκτικός (hektikós, habitual, hectic, consumptive), from ἕξις (héxis, a state or habit of body or of mind, condition), from ἔχειν (ékhein, to have, hold, intransitive be in a certain state).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈhɛktɪk/
  • Rhymes: -ɛktɪk
  • Hyphenation: hec‧tic

Adjective

hectic (comparative more hectic, superlative most hectic)

  1. (obsolete) Denoting a type of fever accompanying consumption and similar wasting diseases, characterised by flushed cheeks and dry skin.
    hectic fever
  2. (obsolete) Pertaining to or symptomatic of such a fever.
    • 1788, Mary Wollstonecraft, Mary, Oxford 2009, p. 18:
      Ann had a hectic cough, and many unfavourable prognostics [] .
    • 1826, Mary Shelley, The Last Man, volume 3, chapter 1:
      She never complained, but sleep and appetite fled from her, a slow fever preyed on her veins, her colour was hectic, and she often wept in secret [] .
  3. Very busy with activity and confusion; feverish.
    The city center is so hectic at 8 in the morning that I go to work an hour beforehand to avoid the crowds

Synonyms

  • feverish

Derived terms

  • hectically
  • hecticity
  • hectivity

Translations

Noun

hectic (plural hectics)

  1. (obsolete) A hectic fever.
    • c. 1600,, William Shakespeare, Hamlet, Act IV, Scene 3,[1]
      [] Do it, England;
      For like the hectic in my blood he rages,
      And thou must cure me.
  2. (obsolete) A flush like one produced by such a fever.
    • 1768, Laurence Sterne, A Sentimental Journey Through France and Italy, London: T. Becket & P.A. De Hondt, Volume 1, p. 17,[2]
      The poor Franciscan made no reply: a hectic of a moment pass’d across his cheek, but could not tarry []
    • 1819, Lord Byron, Don Juan, II.147:
      For still he lay, and on his thin worn cheek / A purple hectic played like dying day / On the snow-tops of distant hills []

Further reading

  • hectic in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.
  • hectic in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.

Romanian

Etymology

From French hectique.

Adjective

hectic m or n (feminine singular hectică, masculine plural hectici, feminine and neuter plural hectice)

  1. hectic

Declension


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