fey vs touched what difference

what is difference between fey and touched

English

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /feɪ/
  • Rhymes: -eɪ
  • Homophones: fay

Alternative forms

  • fay

Etymology 1

From Middle English fey (fated to die), from Old English fǣġe (doomed to die, timid), from Proto-Germanic *faigijaz (cowardly, wicked), from Proto-Indo-European *peyk-, *peyg- (ill-meaning, bad).

Akin to Old Saxon fēgi whence Dutch veeg (doomed, near death), Old High German feigi (appointed for death, ungodly) whence German feige (cowardly), Old Norse feigr (doomed) whence the Icelandic feigur (doomed to die), Old English fāh (outlawed, hostile). More at foe.

Adjective

fey (comparative more fey, superlative most fey)

  1. (dialectal, archaic or poetic) About to die; doomed; on the verge of sudden or violent death.
    • 1977, J. R. R. Tolkien, The Silmarillion:
      Then Fëanor laughed as one fey, and he cried: “None and none! What I have left behind I count now no loss; needless baggage on the road it has proved. Let those that cursed my name, curse me still, and whine their way back to the cages of the Valar! Let the ships burn!”
    • 1922, E. R. Eddison, The Worm Ouroboros:
      Surely the Gods have made him fey, having ordained his destruction and our humbling before these Demons.
  2. (obsolete) Dying; dead.
  3. (chiefly Scotland, Ireland) Possessing second sight, clairvoyance, or clairaudience.
  4. Overrefined, affected.
  5. Strange or otherworldly.
  6. Spellbound.
Derived terms
  • feydom
Translations

Etymology 2

From Middle English faie, fei (a place or person possessed with magical properties), from Middle French feie, fee (fairy”, “fae). More at fairy.

Adjective

fey (comparative more fey, superlative most fey)

  1. Magical or fairylike.
Translations

Noun

fey pl (plural only)

  1. Fairy folk collectively.
Synonyms
  • See fairy

See also

  • fay
  • fae

Anagrams

  • Fye, fye

Mapudungun

Pronoun

fey (Raguileo spelling)

  1. Third-person singular personal pronoun. he, she, it.

See also


Middle English

Etymology 1

Inherited from Old English fǣġe, from Proto-Germanic *faigijaz.

Alternative forms

  • (Early ME) fæie, væie, fæy, feiȝe, vaiȝe, feaye
  • feye, fay, faie, veie, veye, faye, fei, vey

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈfɛi̯(ə)/
  • (Southern ME) IPA(key): /ˈvɛi̯(ə)/
  • Rhymes: -ɛi̯(ə)

Adjective

fey

  1. Marked, fated for, or destined for death; doomed.
  2. Approaching or near one’s deathbed; about to pass away.
  3. (rare) Tending to cause or leading to death; dangerous.
  4. (rare) Having bad luck; frowned upon by fate or fortune.
  5. (rare) Weak, afflicted, or vulnerable.
Descendants
  • English: fey, fay
  • Scots: fey
References
  • “fei(e, adj.”, in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007, retrieved 2019-1-3.

Etymology 2

Borrowed from Old French feie (modern French foie), from Latin fīcātum.

Alternative forms

  • fee

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈfɛi̯(ə)/
  • Rhymes: -ɛi̯(ə)

Noun

fey

  1. (rare) The liver as used in cooking.
References
  • “fei, n.”, in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007, retrieved 2019-1-3.

Scots

Noun

fey (plural feys)

  1. a premonition of death

Adjective

fey

  1. possessing second sight, premonitory

Volapük

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /fej/

Noun

fey (nominative plural feys)

  1. fairy

Declension



English

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /tʌt͡ʃt/
  • Rhymes: -ʌtʃt

Adjective

touched (comparative more touched, superlative most touched)

  1. Emotionally moved (by), made to feel emotion (by).
    I was touched that he should remember my birthday.
    • 1845, Benjamin Disraeli, Sybil, Book 4, Chapter 1,
      “They say her Majesty is more touched about these affairs of the Chartists than anything else,” said Mr Egerton.
    • 1868, Louisa May Alcott, Little Women, Part 2, Chapter 42: All Alone,
      “If there is anything good or true in what I write, it isn’t mine. I owe it all to you and Mother and Beth,” said Jo, more touched by her father’s words than by any amount of praise from the world.
    • 1883, Jules Verne, Mary de Hauteville (translator), The Green Ray, Chapter XXI: A Tempest in a Cavern,
      “And you came to save me, Mr. Oliver,” answered Miss Campbell, more touched by the courage of the young man than the dangers which could still happen.
  2. Slightly mentally deficient; touched in the head.
    • 1913, Fyodor Dostoevsky, Eva M. Martin (translator), The Idiot, Part III, Chapter IV,
      “Don’t you see he is a lunatic, prince?” whispered Evgenie Pavlovitch in his ear. “Someone told me just now that he is a bit touched on the subject of lawyers, that he has a mania for making speeches and intends to pass the examinations. I am expecting a splendid burlesque now.”
    • 1922, James Joyce, Ulysses, Episode 8: The Lestrygonians,
      All a bit touched. Mad Fanny and his other sister Mrs Dickinson driving about with scarlet harness.

Synonyms

  • (moved): affected, emotional, moved
  • (slightly mentally deficient): retarded (offensive), touched in the head

Translations

Verb

touched

  1. simple past tense and past participle of touch

Please follow and like us:

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Social Share Buttons and Icons powered by Ultimatelysocial