fiddle vs tinker what difference

what is difference between fiddle and tinker

English

Etymology

From Middle English fithele, from Old English fiþele. Cognate with Old High German fidula (German Fiedel), Middle Dutch vedele (Dutch vedel, veel), Old Norse fiðla (Icelandic fiðla, Danish fiddel, Norwegian fela).

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /ˈfɪd(ə)l/
  • (General American) enPR: fĭdʹl, IPA(key): /ˈfɪdl̩/, [ˈfɪɾl̩]
  • Hyphenation: fid‧dle
  • Rhymes: -ɪdəl

Noun

fiddle (plural fiddles)

  1. (music) Any of various bowed string instruments, often a violin when played in any of various traditional styles, as opposed to classical violin.
    Synonym: violin
  2. A kind of dock (Rumex pulcher) with leaves shaped like the musical instrument.
  3. An adjustment intended to cover up a basic flaw.
  4. A fraud; a scam.
  5. (nautical) On board a ship or boat, a rail or batten around the edge of a table or stove to prevent objects falling off at sea. (Also fiddle rail)

Derived terms

Translations

See also

  • crowd, crwth

Verb

fiddle (third-person singular simple present fiddles, present participle fiddling, simple past and past participle fiddled)

  1. To play aimlessly.
    • Talking, and fiddling with their hats and feathers.
    You’re fiddling your life away.
  2. (transitive) To adjust or manipulate for deception or fraud.
    I needed to fiddle the lighting parameters to get the image to look right.
    Fred was sacked when the auditors caught him fiddling the books.
  3. (music) To play traditional tunes on a violin in a non-classical style.
    • 1625, Francis Bacon, Of the True Greatness of Kingdoms and Estates
      Themistocles [] said he could not fiddle, but yet he could make a small town a great city.
  4. To touch or fidget with something in a restless or nervous way, or tinker with something in an attempt to make minor adjustments or improvements.

Synonyms

  • (to adjust in order to cover a basic flaw): fudge

Derived terms

Translations

See also

  • fritter


English

Etymology

From Middle English tinkere, perhaps from Old English *tincere, from tin (tin) + Old English *cere (as in bēocere (beekeeper)), from Proto-Germanic *kazjaz (vessel-maker), from Proto-Germanic *kazą (vessel; vat; tub).

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /ˈtɪŋkə(ɹ)/
  • (General American) IPA(key): /ˈtɪŋkɚ/
  • Hyphenation: tin‧ker
  • Rhymes: -ɪŋkə(ɹ)

Noun

tinker (plural tinkers)

  1. An itinerant tinsmith and mender of household utensils made of metal.
  2. (dated, chiefly Britain and Ireland, offensive) A member of the Irish Traveller community. A gypsy.
  3. (usually with “little”) A mischievous person, especially a playful, impish youngster.
  4. Someone who repairs, or attempts repair, on anything mechanical, or who invents such devices; one who tinkers; a tinkerer.
  5. The act of repair or invention. (Can we add an example for this sense?)
  6. (military, obsolete) A hand mortar.
  7. Any of various fish: the chub mackerel, the silverside, the skate, or a young mackerel about two years old.
  8. A bird, the razor-billed auk.

Synonyms

  • (mischievous person): rapscallion, rascal, rogue, scamp, scoundrel
  • (member of the travelling community): traveller

Derived terms

  • if ifs and ands were pots and pans, there’d be no work for tinkers’ hands
  • tinkerer

Translations

Verb

tinker (third-person singular simple present tinkers, present participle tinkering, simple past and past participle tinkered)

  1. (intransitive) To fiddle with something in an attempt to fix, mend or improve it, especially in an experimental or unskilled manner.
  2. (intransitive) To work as a tinker.
  3. (transitive) To tinker with; to tweak or attempt to fix.
    • 1894, Thomas Hardy, A Few Crusted Characters
      the broken bureau-lock and tinkered window-pane

Translations

See also

  • tinker, tailor
  • tinker’s damn

Further reading

  • tinker in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.

Anagrams

  • Kinter, reknit

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