figural vs figurative what difference

what is difference between figural and figurative

English

Etymology

From Old French figural, from late Latin figūrālis, from figūra (figure).

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /ˈfɪɡ(j)ʊɹəl/
  • (General American) IPA(key): /ˈfɪɡjəɹəl/
  • Hyphenation: fig‧ur‧al

Adjective

figural (comparative more figural, superlative most figural)

  1. Representing by means of a figure; emblematic.
    • 2007, John Burrow, A History of Histories, Penguin 2009, p. 185:
      The counterparts, in the Christian era, to the figural anticipation of Christ in the Old Testament were the deliverer monarchs and leaders of later times []
  2. Figurative, not literal.
  3. (mathematics, obsolete) Of numbers, describing a geometrical figure.
  4. (obsolete) Pertaining to a figure, shape.
  5. (rare) Pertaining to (human) figures.
    • 2009, Diarmaid MacCulloch, A History of Christianity, Penguin 2010, p. 262-3:
      Some of the Umayyads found themselves charmed by the cultures which they had conquered, so that archaeologists in Palestine and Syria have revealed an astonishing flourishing of Christian-style figural art under their rule.
  6. (music) Figurate.

Old French

Adjective

figural m (oblique and nominative feminine singular figurale)

  1. symbolic

Declension

Descendants

  • English: figural
  • French: figural


English

Etymology

From Middle French figuratif.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈfɪɡəɹətɪv/

Adjective

figurative (comparative more figurative, superlative most figurative)

  1. Of use as a metaphor, simile, or metonym, as opposed to literal; using figures; as when saying that someone who eats more than they should is a pig or like a pig.
  2. Metaphorically so called.
  3. With many figures of speech.
  4. Emblematic, symbolic; representative, exemplative
    • 1594, Richard Hooker, Of the Lawes of Ecclesiastical Politie
      This, they will say, was figurative, and served, by God’s appointment, but for a time, to shadow out the true glory of a more divine sanctity.
  5. (art) representing forms recognisable in life and clearly derived from real object sources, in contrast to abstract art.
    • 1875-1886, John Addington Symonds, Renaissance in Italy
      They belonged to a nation dedicated to the figurative arts, and they wrote for a public familiar with painted form.

Usage notes

  • Said of language, expression, etc.

Antonyms

  • literal

Derived terms

Related terms

  • figure

Translations

Further reading

  • figurative in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.
  • figurative in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.
  • “figurative”, in Lexico, Dictionary.com; Oxford University Press, 2019–present.
  • figurative art on Wikipedia.Wikipedia

French

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /fi.ɡy.ʁa.tiv/
  • Homophone: figuratives

Adjective

figurative

  1. feminine singular of figuratif

German

Pronunciation

Adjective

figurative

  1. inflection of figurativ:
    1. strong/mixed nominative/accusative feminine singular
    2. strong nominative/accusative plural
    3. weak nominative all-gender singular
    4. weak accusative feminine/neuter singular

Italian

Adjective

figurative

  1. feminine plural of figurativo

Anagrams

  • figuratevi

Norwegian Bokmål

Adjective

figurative

  1. definite singular/plural of figurativ

Norwegian Nynorsk

Adjective

figurative

  1. definite singular/plural of figurativ

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