figure vs name what difference

what is difference between figure and name

English

Etymology

From Middle English figure, borrowed from Old French figure, from Latin figūra (form, shape, form of a word, a figure of speech, Late Latin a sketch, drawing), from fingō (to form, shape, mold, fashion), from Proto-Indo-European *dʰeyǵʰ- (to mold, shape, form, knead). Cognate with Ancient Greek τεῖχος (teîkhos), Sanskrit देग्धि (degdhi), Old English dāg (dough). More at dough. Doublet of figura.

Pronunciation

  • (General American) IPA(key): /ˈfɪɡjɚ/, /ˈfɪɡɚ/
  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /ˈfɪɡə/
  • (Canada) IPA(key): /ˈfɪɡɚ/, /ˈfɪɡjɚ/
  • Rhymes: -ɪɡə(ɹ), -ɪɡjə(ɹ)
  • Hyphenation: fig‧ure

Noun

figure (plural figures)

  1. A drawing or diagram conveying information.
  2. The representation of any form, as by drawing, painting, modelling, carving, embroidering, etc.; especially, a representation of the human body.
    a figure in bronze; a figure cut in marble
  3. A person or thing representing a certain consciousness.
  4. The appearance or impression made by the conduct or career of a person.
    He cut a sorry figure standing there in the rain.
    • I made some figure there.
    • 1770, William Blackstone, Commentaries on the Laws of England
      gentlemen of the best figure in the county
  5. (obsolete) Distinguished appearance; magnificence; conspicuous representation; splendour; show.
    • 1729, William Law, A Serious Call to a Devout and Holy Life
      that he may live in figure and indulgence
  6. A human figure, which dress or corset must fit to; the shape of a human body.
  7. A numeral.
  8. A number, an amount.
  9. A shape.
  10. A visible pattern as in wood or cloth.
    The muslin was of a pretty figure.
  11. Any complex dance moveW.
  12. A figure of speech.
  13. (logic) The form of a syllogism with respect to the relative position of the middle term.
  14. (astrology) A horoscope; the diagram of the aspects of the astrological houses.
    • 1889, Franz Hartmann, The Principles of Astrological Geomancy
      its quality, like those of all the rest, is determined by its position in the house of the astrological figure
  15. (music) Any short succession of notes, either as melody or as a group of chords, which produce a single complete and distinct impression.
    • 1888, George Grove, Beethoven’s Nine Symphonies: Analytical Essays
      Here, Beethoven limits the syncopations and modifications of rhythm which are so prominent in the first and third movements, and employs a rapid, busy, and most melodious figure in the Violins, which is irresistible in its gay and brilliant effect []
  16. (music) A form of melody or accompaniment kept up through a strain or passage; a motif; a florid embellishment.

Derived terms

Related terms

  • figurine
  • figurative
  • figuratively

Descendants

  • Japanese: フィギュア (figyua)

Translations

Verb

figure (third-person singular simple present figures, present participle figuring, simple past and past participle figured)

  1. (chiefly US) To calculate, to solve a mathematical problem.
  2. (chiefly US) To come to understand.
  3. To think, to assume, to suppose, to reckon.
  4. (chiefly US, intransitive) To be reasonable.
  5. (intransitive) To enter into; to be a part of.
  6. (obsolete) To represent by a figure, as to form or mould; to make an image of, either palpable or ideal; also, to fashion into a determinate form; to shape.
  7. To embellish with design; to adorn with figures.
  8. (obsolete) To indicate by numerals.
    • 1698 , John Dryden, Epitaph of Mary Frampton
      As through a crystal glass the figured hours are seen.
  9. To represent by a metaphor; to signify or symbolize.
  10. (obsolete) To prefigure; to foreshow.
  11. (music) To write over or under the bass, as figures or other characters, in order to indicate the accompanying chords.
  12. (music) To embellish.

Derived terms

  • go figure
  • prefigure
  • figure on
  • figure out (US)

Translations

Further reading

  • figure in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.
  • figure in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.

French

Etymology

Borrowed from Latin figūra.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /fi.ɡyʁ/

Noun

figure f (plural figures)

  1. face
  2. figure

Synonyms

  • visage

Derived terms

Further reading

  • “figure” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

Italian

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /fiˈɡu.re/
  • Rhymes: -ure

Noun

figure f

  1. plural of figura

Portuguese

Verb

figure

  1. first-person singular present subjunctive of figurar
  2. third-person singular present subjunctive of figurar
  3. third-person singular negative imperative of figurar
  4. third-person singular imperative of figurar

Spanish

Verb

figure

  1. Formal second-person singular (usted) imperative form of figurar.
  2. First-person singular (yo) present subjunctive form of figurar.
  3. Formal second-person singular (usted) present subjunctive form of figurar.
  4. Third-person singular (él, ella, also used with usted?) present subjunctive form of figurar.


English

Etymology 1

From Middle English name, nome, from Old English nama, noma, from Proto-West Germanic *namō, from Proto-Germanic *namô, from Proto-Indo-European *h₁nómn̥. Cognates include Saterland Frisian Noome, West Frisian namme, Dutch naam, German Name, Danish navn, Swedish namn, Latin nōmen (Spanish nombre). Possible cognates outside of Indo-European include Finnish nimi.

Pronunciation

  • enPR: nām, IPA(key): /neɪm/
  • Rhymes: -eɪm

Noun

name (plural names)

  1. Any nounal word or phrase which indicates a particular person, place, class, or thing.
    Synonyms: proper name; see also Thesaurus:name
    • Whatsoever Adam called every living creature, that was the name thereof.
    • 1904, L. Frank Baum, The Marvelous Land of Oz:
      So good a man as this must surely have a name.
  2. Reputation.
    • 1902, John Buchan, The Outgoing of the Tide
      The parish stank of idolatry, abominable rites were practiced in secret, and in all the bounds there was no one had a more evil name for the black traffic than one Alison Sempill, who bode at the Skerburnfoot.
    • 1952, Old Testament, Revised Standard Version, Thomas Nelson & Sons, 2 Samuel 8:13:
      And David won a name for himself.[1]
  3. An abusive or insulting epithet.
  4. A person (or legal person).
    • They list with women each degenerate name.
    • p. 2002, second edition of, 2002, Graham Richards, Putting Psychology in its Place, →ISBN, page 287 [2]
      Later British psychologists interested in this topic include such major names as Cyril Burt, William McDougall, [] .
    • 2008 edition of, 1998, S. B. Budhiraja and M. B. Athreya, Cases in Strategic Management, →ISBN page 79 [3]:
      Would it be able to fight the competition from ITC Agro Tech and Liptons who were ready and able to commit large resources? With such big names as competitors, would this business be viable for Marico?
    • 2009 third edition of, 1998, Martin Mowforth and Ian Munt, Tourism and Sustainability, →ISBN, page 29 [4]:
      International non-governmental organisations (INGOs), including such household names as Amnesty International, Greenpeace and [] .
  5. Those of a certain name; a race; a family.
  6. (computing) A unique identifier, generally a string of characters.
  7. (Britain, finance) An investor in Lloyds of London bearing unlimited liability.
  8. Authority.
Hyponyms
Derived terms
Related terms
  • anonymous
  • cognomen
  • namely
  • nom de guerre
  • nom de plume
  • nominal
  • pseudonym
Descendants
  • Sranan Tongo: nen
  • Japanese: ネーム
Translations
References
  • name on Wikipedia.Wikipedia

Etymology 2

From Middle English namen, from Old English namian (to name, mention) and ġenamian (to name, call, appoint), from Proto-West Germanic *namōn (to name). Compare also Old English nemnan, nemnian (to name, give a name to a person or thing).

Verb

name (third-person singular simple present names, present participle naming, simple past and past participle named)

  1. (ditransitive) To give a name to.
  2. (transitive) To mention, specify.
  3. (transitive) To identify as relevant or important
  4. (transitive) To publicly implicate by name.
  5. (transitive) To designate for a role.
  6. (transitive, Westminster system politics) To initiate a process to temporarily remove a member of parliament who is breaking the rules of conduct.
Synonyms
  • (give a name to): bename, designate, dub; see also Thesaurus:denominate
Derived terms
Translations

See also

  • christen
  • epithet
  • moniker
  • sobriquet

Etymology 3

Borrowed from Spanish ñame, substituting n for the unfamiliar Spanish letter ñ. Doublet of yam.

Noun

name (plural names)

  1. Any of several types of true yam (Dioscorea) used in Caribbean Spanish cooking.
Synonyms
  • cush-cush
Translations

Anagrams

  • -mane, -nema, Amen, Eman, Enma, MEAN, MENA, Mena, NEMA, NMEA, amen, mane, mean, mnae, neam

Afrikaans

Noun

name

  1. plural of naam

Central Malay

Etymology

Borrowed from Sanskrit नामन् (nāman). Cognate with English name.

Noun

name

  1. name

References

  • “Besemah” in Greenhill, S.J., Blust, R., & Gray, R.D. (2008). The Austronesian Basic Vocabulary Database: From Bioinformatics to Lexomics. Evolutionary Bioinformatics, 4:271-283.

Cimbrian

Noun

name ?

  1. (Tredici Comuni) name

References

  • “name” in Patuzzi, Umberto, ed., (2013) Ünsarne Börtar [Our Words], Luserna, Italy: Comitato unitario delle isole linguistiche storiche germaniche in Italia / Einheitskomitee der historischen deutschen Sprachinseln in Italien

Dutch

Pronunciation

Verb

name

  1. (archaic) singular past subjunctive of nemen

Noun

name

  1. (archaic) Dative singular form of naam

Anagrams

  • amen, mane

Eastern Arrernte

Noun

name

  1. grass

References

  • 2007. The UCLA Phonetics Lab Archive. Los Angeles, CA: UCLA Department of Linguistics.

Japanese

Romanization

name

  1. Rōmaji transcription of なめ

Lithuanian

Noun

name m

  1. locative singular of namas
  2. vocative singular of namas

Middle Dutch

Etymology 1

From Old Dutch namo, from Proto-Germanic *namô.

Noun

nāme m or f

  1. name
  2. fame, reputation
Inflection

This noun needs an inflection-table template.

Derived terms
  • nāmen
Descendants
  • Dutch: naam
  • Limburgish: naam, naom

Etymology 2

From Old Dutch *nāma, from Proto-Germanic *nēmō.

Noun

nâme f

  1. taking
  2. receiving
Inflection

This noun needs an inflection-table template.

Related terms
  • nēmen
Descendants
  • Dutch: name (mostly in compounds)

Further reading

  • “name”, in Vroegmiddelnederlands Woordenboek, 2000
  • Verwijs, E.; Verdam, J. (1885–1929), “name (I)”, in Middelnederlandsch Woordenboek, The Hague: Martinus Nijhoff, →ISBN, page I
  • Verwijs, E.; Verdam, J. (1885–1929), “name (II)”, in Middelnederlandsch Woordenboek, The Hague: Martinus Nijhoff, →ISBN, page II

Middle English

Alternative forms

  • nome

Etymology

From Old English nama, from Proto-West Germanic *namō, from Proto-Germanic *namô, from Proto-Indo-European *h₁nómn̥.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈnaːm(ə)/

Noun

name (plural names or namen)

  1. name

Related terms

  • surname

Descendants

  • English: name
  • Scots: name, naim, nem, nome
  • Yola: naame

References

  • “nāme, n.”, in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007.

Northern Kurdish

Etymology

Borrowed from Persian نامه(nâme).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /nɑːˈmɛ/

Noun

name f

  1. letter (a document)

Pali

Alternative forms

Verb

name

  1. singular optative active of namati (to bend)

Volapük

Noun

name

  1. dative singular of nam

Zazaki

Etymology

Compare Middle Persian ????????????(nʾm /nām/).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /nɔːme/

Noun

name (nam?

  1. name
  2. reputation

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