filament vs filum what difference

what is difference between filament and filum

English

Etymology

Borrowed from Medieval Latin fīlāmentum, from Late Latin fīlō (to spin, draw out in a long line), from Latin fīlum (thread)

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈfɪləmənt/

Noun

filament (plural filaments)

  1. A fine thread or wire.
  2. Such a wire, as can be heated until it glows, in an incandescent light bulb or a thermionic valve.
  3. (physics, astronomy) A massive, thread-like structure, such as those gaseous ones which extend outward from the surface of the sun, or such as those (much larger) ones which form the boundaries between large voids in the universe.
    solar filament
    galaxy filament
    the Ursa Major Filament
  4. (botany) The stalk of a flower stamen, supporting the anther.
  5. (textiles) A continuous object, limited in length only by its spool, and not cut to length.

Translations

Anagrams

  • left main

Danish

Etymology

From Medieval Latin fīlāmentum.

Noun

filament n (singular definite filamentet, plural indefinite filamenter)

  1. This term needs a translation to English. Please help out and add a translation, then remove the text {{rfdef}}.

Declension

References

  • “filament” in Den Danske Ordbog

French

Noun

filament m (plural filaments)

  1. filament

Norwegian Bokmål

Etymology

From Medieval Latin fīlāmentum.

Noun

filament n (definite singular filamentet, indefinite plural filament or filamenter, definite plural filamenta or filamentene)

  1. a filament

References

  • “filament” in Det Norske Akademis ordbok (NAOB).

Norwegian Nynorsk

Etymology

From Medieval Latin fīlāmentum.

Noun

filament n (definite singular filamentet, indefinite plural filament, definite plural filamenta)

  1. a filament

Romanian

Etymology

From French filament, from Latin filamentum.

Noun

filament n (plural filamente)

  1. filament

Declension



English

Etymology

From Latin fīlum (thread). Doublet of file.

Noun

filum (plural fila)

  1. (anatomy) a filamentous anatomical structure

Latin

Etymology

From Proto-Italic *fī(s)lom, from Proto-Indo-European *gʷʰiH-(s-)lo-. Cognate with Lithuanian gysla.

Pronunciation

  • (Classical) IPA(key): /ˈfiː.lum/, [ˈfiːɫ̪ʊ̃ˑ]
  • (Ecclesiastical) IPA(key): /ˈfi.lum/, [ˈfiːlum]

Noun

fīlum n (genitive fīlī); second declension

  1. thread, string, filament, fiber
  2. texture, style, nature
  3. wick of a lamp

Declension

Second-declension noun (neuter).

Synonyms

  • (wick): mergulus

Descendants

  • Corsican: filu
  • Dalmatian: fil
  • Eastern Romance:
    • Aromanian: hir, hjir, hiru
    • Romanian: fir
  • Italian: filo, fila
  • Old French: fil
    • French: fil
      • English: file (collection of papers) (see there for further descendants)
      • French: file
        • English: file (column of people)
        • Spanish: fila
  • Old Leonese:
    • Asturian: filu
  • Old Occitan:
    • Catalan: fil, fila
    • Occitan: fial
  • Old Portuguese: fio
    • Galician: fío
    • Portuguese: fio
  • Old Spanish: filo
    • Spanish: hilo, filo
      • Cebuano: hilo
      • Kapampangan: hilo
  • Rhaeto-Romance:
    • Friulian: fîl
    • Romansch: fil
  • Sardinian: filu, fiu
  • Sicilian: filu
  • Venetian: fiło, fil
    • Turkish: filo
  • Albanian: fill
  • English: filum

Noun

fīlum n

  1. accusative singular of fīlum
  2. vocative singular of fīlum

References

  • filum in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • filum in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • filum in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition with additions by D. P. Carpenterius, Adelungius and others, edited by Léopold Favre, 1883–1887)
  • filum in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré Latin-Français, Hachette


Please follow and like us:

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Social Share Buttons and Icons powered by Ultimatelysocial