filament vs strand what difference

what is difference between filament and strand

English

Etymology

Borrowed from Medieval Latin fīlāmentum, from Late Latin fīlō (to spin, draw out in a long line), from Latin fīlum (thread)

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈfɪləmənt/

Noun

filament (plural filaments)

  1. A fine thread or wire.
  2. Such a wire, as can be heated until it glows, in an incandescent light bulb or a thermionic valve.
  3. (physics, astronomy) A massive, thread-like structure, such as those gaseous ones which extend outward from the surface of the sun, or such as those (much larger) ones which form the boundaries between large voids in the universe.
    solar filament
    galaxy filament
    the Ursa Major Filament
  4. (botany) The stalk of a flower stamen, supporting the anther.
  5. (textiles) A continuous object, limited in length only by its spool, and not cut to length.

Translations

Anagrams

  • left main

Danish

Etymology

From Medieval Latin fīlāmentum.

Noun

filament n (singular definite filamentet, plural indefinite filamenter)

  1. This term needs a translation to English. Please help out and add a translation, then remove the text {{rfdef}}.

Declension

References

  • “filament” in Den Danske Ordbog

French

Noun

filament m (plural filaments)

  1. filament

Norwegian Bokmål

Etymology

From Medieval Latin fīlāmentum.

Noun

filament n (definite singular filamentet, indefinite plural filament or filamenter, definite plural filamenta or filamentene)

  1. a filament

References

  • “filament” in Det Norske Akademis ordbok (NAOB).

Norwegian Nynorsk

Etymology

From Medieval Latin fīlāmentum.

Noun

filament n (definite singular filamentet, indefinite plural filament, definite plural filamenta)

  1. a filament

Romanian

Etymology

From French filament, from Latin filamentum.

Noun

filament n (plural filamente)

  1. filament

Declension



English

Pronunciation

  • (UK) IPA(key): /stɹænd/
  • (General American) IPA(key): /stɹænd/, [stɹɛənd]
  • Rhymes: -ænd

Etymology 1

From Middle English strand, strond, from Old English strand (strand, sea-shore, shore), from Proto-Germanic *strandō (edge, rim, shore), from Proto-Indo-European *(s)trAnt- (strand, border, field), from Proto-Indo-European *ster- (to broaden, spread out). Cognate with West Frisian strân, Dutch strand, German Strand, Danish strand, Swedish strand, Norwegian Bokmål strand.

Noun

strand (plural strands)

  1. The shore or beach of the sea or ocean; shore; beach.
  2. (poetic, archaic or regional) The shore or beach of a lake or river.
  3. A small brook or rivulet.
  4. (Britain dialectal, Northern England, Scotland) A passage for water; gutter.
  5. A street (perhaps from the similarity of shape).
Alternative forms
  • strond (obsolete)
Translations

Verb

strand (third-person singular simple present strands, present participle stranding, simple past and past participle stranded)

  1. (transitive, nautical) To run aground; to beach.
  2. (transitive, figuratively) To leave (someone) in a difficult situation; to abandon or desert.
  3. (transitive, baseball) To cause the third out of an inning to be made, leaving a runner on base.
    Jones pops up; that’s going to strand a pair.
Synonyms
  • (run aground): beach
  • (leave someone in a difficult situation): abandon, desert
Translations

Etymology 2

Origin uncertain. Cognate with Scots stran, strawn, strand (strand). Perhaps the same as strand (“rivulet, stream, gutter”; see Etymology 1 above); or from Middle English *stran, from Old French estran (a rope, cord), from Middle High German stren, strene (skein, strand), from Old High German streno, from Proto-West Germanic *strenō, from Proto-Germanic *strinô (strip, strand), from Proto-Indo-European *strēy-, *ster- (strip, line, streak, ray, stripe, row); related to Dutch streen (skein, hank of thread, strand, string), German Strähne (skein, hank of thread, strand of hair).

Noun

strand (plural strands)

  1. Each of the strings which, twisted together, make up a yarn, rope or cord.
  2. A string.
  3. An individual length of any fine, string-like substance.
    strand of spaghetti
    strand of hair.
  4. (electronics) A group of wires, usually twisted or braided.
  5. (broadcasting) A series of programmes on a particular theme or linked subject.
  6. (figuratively) An element in a composite whole; a sequence of linked events or facts; a logical thread.
    strand of truth
    • 2004, David Wray, Literacy: Major Themes in Education, Taylor & Francis →ISBN, page 78
      She responds to both questions in writing and checks her answer on the fact question. Her suspicions confirmed about the importance of the two names, Miranda vows to pay close attention to this strand of the story as she continues to read.
  7. (genetics) A nucleotide chain.
Synonyms
  • See also Thesaurus:string
Derived terms
  • do the strand
Translations

Note: many languages have particular words for “a strand of <substance>” that are different for each substance. The translations below refer to strands in general. You might find a more appropriate translation under the word for the substance itself.

Verb

strand (third-person singular simple present strands, present participle stranding, simple past and past participle stranded)

  1. (transitive) To break a strand of (a rope).
  2. (transitive) To form by uniting strands.
Translations

Anagrams

  • Arndts, drants

Afrikaans

Etymology

From Dutch strand, from Middle Dutch strant.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /strant/

Noun

strand (plural strande, diminutive strandjie)

  1. beach

Danish

Etymology

From Old Norse strǫnd.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /stran/, [sd̥ʁɑnˀ]

Noun

strand c (singular definite stranden, plural indefinite strande)

  1. beach
  2. shore, seashore
  3. seaside

Inflection

Derived terms

Verb

strand

  1. imperative of strande

Dutch

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /strɑnt/
  • Hyphenation: strand
  • Rhymes: -ɑnt

Etymology 1

From Middle Dutch strant. This etymology is incomplete. You can help Wiktionary by elaborating on the origins of this term.

Noun

strand n (plural stranden, diminutive strandje n)

  1. beach, strand
Derived terms
Descendants
  • Afrikaans: strand

Etymology 2

See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

Verb

strand

  1. first-person singular present indicative of stranden
  2. imperative of stranden

Hungarian

Etymology

From German Strand.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ˈʃtrɒnd]
  • Rhymes: -ɒnd

Noun

strand (plural strandok)

  1. beach (a sandy shore of a body of water used for summertime leisure, swimming, suntanning)
  2. pool, swimming pool (an urban open-air facility with lawns, trees and several artificially constructed pools, used for summertime leisure)

Declension

Derived terms

  • strandol
  • strandos

(Compound words):

  • strandcipő
  • strandpapucs
  • strandtáska

References

Further reading

  • strand in Bárczi, Géza and László Országh. A magyar nyelv értelmező szótára (’The Explanatory Dictionary of the Hungarian Language’). Budapest: Akadémiai Kiadó, 1959–1962. Fifth ed., 1992: →ISBN

Icelandic

Etymology

From stranda (to run aground).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /strant/
  • Rhymes: -ant

Noun

strand n (genitive singular strands, nominative plural strönd)

  1. running aground, stranding

Declension


Middle English

Alternative forms

  • strande
  • stround, stronde, strond

Etymology

From Old English strand.

Noun

strand (plural strandes)

  1. (chiefly Northern) beach, shoreline

Descendants

  • English: strand
  • Scots: strand
  • Yola: sthroane

References

  • “strō̆nd(e, n.(1).”, in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007.

Norwegian Bokmål

Etymology 1

From Old Norse strǫnd

Noun

strand f or m (definite singular stranda or stranden, indefinite plural strender, definite plural strendene)

  1. a beach or shore
Derived terms
  • nakenstrand
  • sandstrand
  • strande
  • strandlinje

Etymology 2

Verb

strand

  1. imperative of strande

References

  • “strand” in The Bokmål Dictionary.

Norwegian Nynorsk

Etymology

From Old Norse strǫnd. Akin to English strand.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /strɑnd/, /strɑnː/

Noun

strand f (definite singular stranda, indefinite plural strender, definite plural strendene)

  1. a beach or shore

Derived terms

  • nakenstrand
  • sandstrand
  • strande
  • strandlinje

References

  • “strand” in The Nynorsk Dictionary.

Old English

Etymology

From Proto-Germanic *strandō.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /strɑnd/

Noun

strand n

  1. beach
  2. shore

Declension

Descendants

  • Middle English: strand, strande
    • English: strand
    • Scots: strand
    • Yola: sthroane
  • Old French: estrande, estran

Old Saxon

Etymology

From Proto-Germanic *strandō (edge; shore).

Noun

strand n

  1. beach

Descendants

  • Middle Low German: strand, strant m
    • Plautdietsch: Straunt

Swedish

Etymology

From Old Swedish strand, from Old Norse strǫnd, from Proto-Germanic *strandō, from Proto-Indo-European *(s)trAnt-.

Pronunciation

Noun

strand c

  1. beach (not necessarily sandy)
  2. shore

Declension

Related terms

References

  • strand in Svenska Akademiens ordlista (SAOL)

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