file vs register what difference

what is difference between file and register

English

Pronunciation

  • (UK, US) IPA(key): /faɪl/, [faɪ̯ɫ]
  • Rhymes: -aɪl

Etymology 1

From Old French fil (thread), from Latin fīlum (thread). Doublet of filum.

Noun

file (plural files)

  1. A collection of papers collated and archived together.
  2. A roll or list.
  3. Course of thought; thread of narration.
    • 1642, Henry Wotton, A Short View of the Life and Death of George Villiers
      Let me resume the file of my narration.
  4. (computing) An aggregation of data on a storage device, identified by a name.
    I’m going to delete these unwanted files to free up some disk space.
Synonyms
  • (collection): document, paper
Hyponyms
Derived terms
Descendants
Translations

Verb

file (third-person singular simple present files, present participle filing, simple past and past participle filed)

  1. (transitive) To commit (official papers) to some office.
  2. (transitive) To submit (a story) to a newspaper or similar publication.
  3. (transitive) To place in an archive in a logical place and order.
  4. (transitive) To store a file (aggregation of data) on a storage medium such as a disc or another computer.
  5. (intransitive, with for, chiefly law) To submit a formal request to some office.
    She filed for divorce the next day.
    The company filed for bankruptcy when the office opened on Monday.
    They filed for a refund under their warranty.
  6. (transitive, obsolete) To set in order; to arrange, or lay away.
    • I would have my several courses and my dishes well filed.
Derived terms
  • filings
  • file away
Translations

Etymology 2

From French file, from filer (to spin out, arrange one behind another), from Latin fīlāre, from filum (thread).

Noun

file (plural files)

  1. A column of people one behind another, whether “single file” or in a large group with many files side by side.
    The troops marched in Indian file.
  2. (military) A small detachment of soldiers.
  3. (chess) one of the eight vertical lines of squares on a chessboard (i.e., those identified by a letter). The analog horizontal lines are the ranks.
Derived terms
Translations

Verb

file (third-person singular simple present files, present participle filing, simple past and past participle filed)

  1. (intransitive) To move in a file.
    The applicants kept filing into the room until it was full.
Derived terms

Translations

Etymology 3

From Middle English file, fyle, from Old English fēl, fēol (file), from earlier fīil, from Proto-Germanic *finhlō, *finhilō (file, rasp), from Proto-Indo-European *peyḱ- (to adorn, form). Cognate with West Frisian file (file), Dutch vijl (file), German Feile (file).

Noun

file (plural files)

  1. A hand tool consisting of a handle to which a block of coarse metal is attached, and used for removing sharp edges or for cutting, especially through metal.
  2. (slang, archaic) A cunning or resourceful person.
    • 1857-1859, William Makepeace Thackeray, The Virginians
      Will is an old file, in spite of his smooth face.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Fielding to this entry?)
Hyponyms
  • rasp
Derived terms
Translations

Verb

file (third-person singular simple present files, present participle filing, simple past and past participle filed)

  1. (transitive) To smooth, grind, or cut with a file.
Derived terms
  • file down
  • file off
  • filing
Translations

Etymology 4

From Middle English filen (to defile), from Old English fȳlan (to defile, make foul), from Proto-West Germanic *fūlijan (to make foul). More at defile.

Verb

file (third-person singular simple present files, present participle filing, simple past and past participle filed)

  1. (archaic) To defile.
  2. To corrupt.

Anagrams

  • Life, flie, lief, life

Dutch

Etymology 1

From French file (line, row), from Late Latin filare, from Latin filum (thread). Related to fileren (to fillet) and file (computer file).

Pronunciation

  • Hyphenation: fi‧le

Noun

file f (plural files, diminutive filetje n)

  1. traffic jam
  2. queue
Synonyms
  • opstopping

Etymology 2

From English file (computer file), from Old French fil (thread), from Latin filum (thread). Related to fileren (to fillet) and file (queue, traffic jam).

Pronunciation

  • Hyphenation: file

Noun

file m (plural files, diminutive filetje n)

  1. (computing) file (an aggregation of data on a storage device identified by a name)

Anagrams

  • lief

Esperanto

Etymology

fil- + -e

Adverb

file

  1. filially (in a filial manner or way)

Finnish

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈfileˣ/, [ˈfile̞(ʔ)]
  • Rhymes: -ile
  • Syllabification: fi‧le

Noun

file

  1. Alternative form of filee

Declension


French

Etymology

From fil or the verb filer.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /fil/
  • Homophones: fil, filent, files, fils, Phil, -phile

Noun

file f (plural files)

  1. A line of objects placed one after the other.
  2. (Belgium) traffic jam

Synonyms

  • (jam): bouchon, embouteillage

Derived terms

Descendants

  • English: file (column of people)
  • Spanish: fila

Verb

file

  1. first-person singular present indicative of filer
  2. third-person singular present indicative of filer
  3. first-person singular present subjunctive of filer
  4. third-person singular present subjunctive of filer
  5. second-person singular imperative of filer

Further reading

  • “file” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

Anagrams

  • fiel

Irish

Etymology

From Old Irish fili, from Primitive Irish ᚃᚓᚂᚔᚈᚐᚄ (velitas), from Proto-Celtic *weless.

Noun

file m (genitive singular file, nominative plural filí)

  1. poet

Declension

Derived terms

Mutation


Italian

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈfi.le/

Noun

file m (invariable)

  1. (computing) file

Noun

file f

  1. plural of fila

Anagrams

  • elfi

Northern Kurdish

Alternative forms

  • fele, fileh, fillah, fille

Etymology

From Arabic فَلَّاح(fallāḥ). Sedentary Armenians called so after their way of life by nomadic Kurds.

Noun

file m or f

  1. Armenian
  2. Christian
  3. peasant, farmer

Derived terms

  • filekî
  • fileyî

References

Further reading

  • Jaba, Auguste; Justi, Ferdinand (1879) Dictionnaire Kurde-Français [Kurdish–French Dictionary], Saint Petersburg: Imperial Academy of Sciences, page 294b
  • Kurdojev, K. K. (1960), “file”, in Kurdsko-russkij slovarʹ [Kurdish–Russian Dictionary], Moscow: Gosudarstvennoje izdatelʹstvo inostrannyx i nacionalʹnyx slovarej, page 263a

Norwegian Nynorsk

Etymology 1

From fil f (a file).

Alternative forms

  • fila (a infinitive)

Verb

file (present tense filar/filer, past tense fila/filte, past participle fila/filt, passive infinitive filast, present participle filande, imperative fil)

  1. (transitive) To use a file to file.
  2. (transitive) To rub (making a sound).
  3. (transitive, figuratively) To polish, refine.

Etymology 2

Probably related to Swedish fil.

Noun

file m (definite singular filen, indefinite plural filar, definite plural filane)

  1. This term needs a translation to English. Please help out and add a translation, then remove the text {{rfdef}}.

References

  • “file” in The Nynorsk Dictionary.

Old Irish

Verb

file

  1. Alternative form of fil

Picard

Etymology

From Latin filia.

Noun

file f (plural files)

  1. girl
  2. daughter

Related terms

  • fiu

Slovene

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /filéː/
  • Hyphenation: fi‧lé

Noun

filẹ̑ m inan

  1. fillet

Inflection


Spanish

Verb

file

  1. Formal second-person singular (usted) imperative form of filar.
  2. First-person singular (yo) present subjunctive form of filar.
  3. Formal second-person singular (usted) present subjunctive form of filar.
  4. Third-person singular (él, ella, also used with usted?) present subjunctive form of filar.


English

Alternative forms

  • registre (obsolete)

Etymology

From Medieval Latin registrum, from Late Latin regesta (list, items recorded), from Latin regerere (to record, to carry back), from re- + gerero (to carry, bear). Compare Latin registoria (a treasurer). Some senses influenced by association with Latin regere (to rule).

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /ˈɹɛdʒ.ɪs.tə/
  • (General American) IPA(key): /ˈɹɛdʒ.ɪs.tɚ/
  • Hyphenation: re‧gis‧ter

Noun

register (plural registers)

  1. A formal recording of names, events, transactions etc.
    The teacher took the register by calling out each child’s name.
  2. A book of such entries.
  3. An entry in such a book.
  4. The act of registering.
  5. A certificate issued by the collector of customs of a port or district to the owner of a vessel, containing the description of a vessel, its name, ownership, and other material facts. It is kept on board the vessel, to be used as evidence of nationality or as a muniment of title.
  6. One who registers or records; a registrar; especially, a public officer charged with the duty of recording certain transactions or events.
    a register of deeds
  7. A distinct horizontal (or, more rarely, vertical) section of a work of art or inscription that is divided into several such sections.
    • 2005, Abeer El-Shahawy, The Egyptian Museum in Cairo: A Walk Through the Alleys of Ancient Egypt, page 23:
      The reverse side is divided into three registers. In the first register is the name of Narmer represented as a fish and a chisel inscribed in the serekh.
  8. A device that automatically records a quantity.
  9. (telecommunications) The part of a telegraphic apparatus that automatically records the message received.
  10. (telecommunications) A list of received calls in a phone set.
  11. (computing) A small unit of very fast memory that is directly accessible to the central processing unit, and is mostly used to store inputs, outputs or intermediate results of computations.
    • 1992, Michael A. Miller, The 68000 Microprocessor Family: Architecture, Programming, and Applications (page 47)
      When the microprocessor decodes the JSR opcode, it stores the operand into the TEMP register and pushes the current contents of the PC ($00 0128) onto the stack.
    • 2014, Jason Gregory, Game Engine Architecture, Second Edition (page 90)
      If you can trace back through the disassembly to where the variable is first loaded into a register, you can often discover its value or its address by inspecting that register.
  12. (printing) The exact alignment of lines, margins and colors.
  13. (printing) The inner part of the mould in which types are cast.
  14. (music) The range of a voice or instrument.
  15. (music) An organ stop.
  16. (linguistics) A style of a language used in a particular context.
    • It seems equally clear that the ‘Complement + Prepositionʼ order illustrated in (172) (a) is likewise highly marked, and hence subject to heavy restrictions on its use. And sure enough, this does indeed seem to be the case: for one thing, forms such as thereafter, herein, whereby are stylistically highly marked (e.g. they are only used in particular registers such as legal language).
  17. A grille at the outflow of a ventilation duct, capable of being opened and closed to direct the air flow.
    • 1984, Stephen King, Gramma
      He went up to the room he shared with Buddy and opened the hot-air register so he could hear what his mother did next.
  18. (chiefly US) Clipping of cash register.

Synonyms

  • See also Thesaurus:list

Hyponyms

  • cash register
  • parish register

Derived terms

  • registry

Related terms

  • register office

Translations

Verb

register (third-person singular simple present registers, present participle registering, simple past and past participle registered)

  1. (transitive) To enter in a register; to enlist.
  2. (transitive) To sign-up, especially to vote.
  3. (transitive) To record, especially in writing.
  4. (transitive, intransitive) To buy the full version of trial software by providing one’s details and payment.
  5. (transitive) To express outward signs.
  6. (transitive, mail) To record officially and handle specially.
  7. (transitive, especially printing) To make or adjust so as to be properly or precisely aligned.
  8. (intransitive) To place one’s name, or have one’s name placed in a register.
    They registered for school.
  9. (intransitive) To make an impression.
  10. (intransitive) To be in proper alignment; to align or correspond exactly.
    • 1974, Robert Elman, The Hunter’s Field Guide to the Game Birds and Animals of North America (→ISBN)
      The slightly smaller hind print may overlap but seldom registers precisely in the front track.
    • 1992, Dwight R. Schuh, Bowhunter’s Encyclopedia: Practical, Easy-to-Find Answers to Your Bowhunting Questions, Stackpole Books (→ISBN), page 279:
      [] but cat tracks are slightly more staggered, and on each side the back foot registers directly on the track of the front foot.
  11. (law) To voluntarily sign over for safe keeping, abandoning complete ownership for partial.

Synonyms

  • (enter in a register): enroll, put down; see also Thesaurus:enlist
  • (sign-up): register, reserve, schedule, enroll, book

Antonyms

  • unregister, deregister

Derived terms

Related terms

  • registrar
  • registration

Translations

References

  • register in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.
  • register in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.

Anagrams

  • Riegerts, registre

Danish

Noun

register n (singular definite registret, plural indefinite registre)

  1. database, registry, data repository
    Hun er ikke i registret for varulve.

    She is not in the registry of werewolves.
  2. (sociolingustics) register
    • 2006, Danske studier →ISBN
      I midten af 1970’erne etablerede Child Directed Speech sig som en retning inden for børnesprogsforskningen, oprindeligt fordi man var inspireret af den antropologisk og sociolingvistisk funderede identifikation af et særligt register, Baby Talk, som voksne bruger i talen til børn (Ferguson 1977).

      In the mid-1970’s, Child Directed Speech established itself as a branch in child language research, originally because one was inspired by the anthropologically and sociolingustically founded identification of a special register, Baby Talk, that adults use in speech with children (Ferguson 1977).
    • 1974, Dialektstudier
      I den sociolingvistiske litteratur læser man ofte at samtaleemnet som en komponent der indgår i de sprogligt interagerendes respektive definitioner af situationen,[sic] kan have indflydelse på valget af den kode eller det register som samtalen føres i.

      In sociolingustic literature, one often reads that the dialog topic, as a component in the lingustically interacting persons’ respective definitions of the situation, may influence the choice of the code or register in which the dialogue is conducted.
  3. This term needs a translation to English. Please help out and add a translation, then remove the text {{rfdef}}.

Declension

Related terms

  • registrere, registreret

Dutch

Etymology

From Middle Dutch register, from Old French registre, from Medieval Latin registrum, which see.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˌrəˈɣɪs.tər/, /ˌreːˈɣɪs.tər/
  • Hyphenation: dag‧re‧gis‧ter

Noun

register n (plural registers, diminutive registertje n)

  1. A register, an index, esp. as an appendix in a book.
  2. A register, a lodger.
  3. A register, a musical range.
  4. A register, a style of language, e.g. with respect to formality and politeness.
  5. A register, an organ stop.

Derived terms

  • dagregister

Related terms

  • registratie
  • registreren

Descendants

  • Afrikaans: register
  • Indonesian: register

Inari Sami

Etymology

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Noun

register

  1. register, registry

Inflection

This noun needs an inflection-table template.

Derived terms

  • registeristiđ

Indonesian

Etymology

From Dutch register, from Middle Dutch register, from Old French registre, from Medieval Latin registrum, which see.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [reˈɡɪstər]
  • Hyphenation: ré‧gis‧têr

Noun

régistêr (first-person possessive registerku, second-person possessive registermu, third-person possessive registernya)

  1. register:
    1. a formal recording of names, events, transactions etc.
    2. (printing) the exact alignment of lines, margins and colors.
    3. (computing) a small unit of very fast memory that is directly accessible to the central processing unit, and is mostly used to store inputs, outputs or intermediate results of computations.

Related terms

Further reading

  • “register” in Kamus Besar Bahasa Indonesia (KBBI) Daring, Jakarta: Badan Pengembangan dan Pembinaan Bahasa, Kementerian Pendidikan dan Kebudayaan Republik Indonesia, 2016.

Norwegian Bokmål

Etymology

From Medieval Latin registrum

Noun

register n (definite singular registeret or registret, indefinite plural register or registre, definite plural registra or registrene)

  1. a register (list or record)
  2. (music) a register (voice range in singing; part of an organ)

Derived terms

  • registerkjede
  • registerreim

Related terms

  • registrere

References

  • “register” in The Bokmål Dictionary.

Norwegian Nynorsk

Etymology

From Medieval Latin registrum

Noun

register n (definite singular registeret, indefinite plural register, definite plural registera)

  1. a register (list or record)
  2. (music) a register (voice range in singing; part of an organ)

Derived terms

  • registerkjede
  • registerreim

Related terms

  • registrere

References

  • “register” in The Nynorsk Dictionary.

Swedish

Etymology

From Old Swedish register, from Medieval Latin registrum, from Late Latin regesta (list, items recorded), from Latin regerere (to record, to carry back), from re- + gerere (to carry, bear). Compare Latin registoria (a treasurer). Some senses influenced by association with Latin regere (to rule).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /rɛˈjɪstɛr/

Noun

register n

  1. a register, a list, an index, a catalog, a directory, a database
  2. a machine that keeps a register, a cash register

Declension

Hyponyms

Derived terms

  • registrera

References


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