fillet vs taenia what difference

what is difference between fillet and taenia

English

Etymology

From Middle English filet, vylette, felet, filette, flette, from Old French filet, diminutive of fil (thread), from Latin fīlum (thread).

Pronunciation

  • enPR: fĭ’lĭt, IPA(key): /ˈfɪ.lɪt/, /ˈfɪˌleɪ̯/
  • (General American) (meat senses) IPA(key): /fɪˈleɪ/
  • Rhymes: -ɪlɪt, -eɪ

Noun

fillet (plural fillets)

  1. (now rare) A headband; a ribbon or other band used to tie the hair up, or keep a headdress in place, or for decoration.
    • 1590, Edmund Spenser, The Faerie Queene, I.iii:
      In secret shadow, farre from all mens sight: / From her faire head her fillet she undight, / And laid her stole aside.
    • 1970, John Glassco, Memoirs of Montparnasse, Mew York 2007, p. 42:
      She was talking of Raymond Duncan, a walking absurdity who dressed in an ancient handwoven Greek costume and wore his hair in long braids reaching to his waist, adding, on ceremonial occasions, a fillet of bay-leaves.
  2. A thin strip of any material, in various technical uses.
  3. (construction) A heavy bead of waterproofing compound or sealant material generally installed at the point where vertical and horizontal surfaces meet.
  4. (engineering, drafting, CAD) A rounded relief or cut at an edge, especially an inside edge, added for a finished appearance and to break sharp edges.
  5. A strip or compact piece of meat or fish from which any bones and skin and feathers have been removed.
  6. (Britain) A premium cut of meat, especially beef, taken from below the lower back of the animal, considered to be lean and tender; also called tenderloin.
    fillet steak
  7. (architecture) A thin featureless moulding/molding used as separation between broader decorative mouldings.
  8. (architecture) The space between two flutings in a shaft.
  9. (heraldry) An ordinary equal in breadth to one quarter of the chief, to the lowest portion of which it corresponds in position.
  10. The thread of a screw.
  11. A colored or gilded border.
  12. The raised moulding around the muzzle of a gun.
  13. (woodworking) Any scantling smaller than a batten.
  14. (anatomy) A fascia; a band of fibres; applied especially to certain bands of white matter in the brain.
  15. The loins of a horse, beginning at the place where the hinder part of the saddle rests.

Synonyms

  • (a boneless cut of meat): filet

Antonyms

  • (rounded outside edge): round

Derived terms

  • chicken fillet

Translations

Further reading

  • Fillet in the 1921 edition of Collier’s Encyclopedia.

Verb

fillet (third-person singular simple present fillets, present participle filleting, simple past and past participle filleted)

  1. (transitive) To slice, bone or make into fillets.
  2. (transitive) To apply, create, or specify a rounded or filled corner to.

Synonyms

  • (make into fillets): bone, debone

Translations



English

Wikispecies

Alternative forms

  • tænia, tenia

Etymology

From Latin taenia, from Ancient Greek ταινία (tainía, ribbon, tape).

Pronunciation

  • Rhymes: -iːniə

Noun

taenia (plural taenias or taeniae)

  1. (historical) A ribbon worn in the hair in ancient Greece.
    • 2002, John Griffiths Pedley, Mario Torelli (editors), Section III: Hellenistic Figurines, K: Fenale Heads, Il Santuario Di Santa Venera a Paestum, University of Michigan Press, page 212,
      Taenia and ivy leaves are added by hand. Figure wears a taenia horizontally over her brow and a spray of ivy in her hair.
  2. (architecture, Doric architecture) A band between the frieze and architrave in the Doric order.
    • 2004, William Bell Dinsmoor, The Propylaia to the Athenian Acropolis, Volume 2: The Classical Building, page 165,
      The height of the taenia was likewise determined with regard to the total height of the epistyle, and again, although we should not expect a proportion of less than one-twelfth of the total height (as in the Parthenon), it is reduced to one-thirteenth, executed as 0.089-0.090 m.
  3. (anatomy) Any of several ribbon-like bands of tissue.
    • 2004, Janice C. Colwell, Fecal and Urinary Diversions: Management and Principles, page 49,
      Each taenia traverses one of the following surfaces of the colon: the anterior surface, the posteroinferior surface, and the posterosuperior surface.
    • 2006, Richard L. Drake, Chapter 128: Anatomy of the Colon, Josef E. Fischer, Kirby I. Bland, Mark P. Callery (editors), Mastery of Surgery, Volume 1, page 1424,
      The general characteristics of the colon are its large caliber; the presence of pendant-shaped bodies of fat enclosed by peritoneum, called omental appendices; and the longitudinal muscle in its walls, which forms three narrow, ribbon-like bands called taeniae coli. The locations of the taeniae are useful landmarks and are specific in relation to the position of the colon itself. The posterior taenia, or tenia omental, is found on the posterolateral border of the ascending and descending colons and the anterior border of the transverse colon. The anterior taenia, or tenia libera, [] .
    • 2006, Hung Tzu Wen, Antônio C. M. Mussi, Albert L. Rhoton Jr, Evandro de Oliveira, Helder Tedeschi, Chapter 41: Surgical Approaches to Lesions Located in the Lateral, Third, and Fourth Ventricles, Laligam N. Sekhar, Richard Glenn Fessler (editors), Atlas of Neurosurgical Techniques: Brain, page 535,
      The choroid plexus is attached medially to the body of the fornix by the taenia fornicis and laterally to the thalamus by the taenia choroidea. The taenia is actually a continuation of the ependyma that covers the ventricular cavity over the choroid plexus of the lateral ventricle.
    • 2009, Carol E. H. Scott-Conner, Operative Anatomy, page 542,
      The taenia selected will generally be the so-called omental taenia, from which the greater omentum arises.
  4. (biology) Any species of the genus Taenia of tapeworms.
    • 1835, W. B. Joy, Worms, John Forbes, Alexander Tweedie, John Conolly (editors), The Cyclopædia of Practical Medicine, Volume 4, page 545,
      About an hour after the last dose, that is, in three hours after commencing the remedy, an entire tænia was voided alive, no other effect than a slight nausea having been experienced by the patient. [] On plunging living tæniae either into the decoction, or into the mixture of the pomegranate bark and water, they writhe and manifest great suffering.

Derived terms

  • taeniacide
  • taeniae coli:
    • taenia libera
    • taenia mesocolica
    • taenia omentalis

Anagrams

  • antiae

French

Etymology

From Latin taenia, from Ancient Greek ταινία (tainía, ribbon, tape).

Noun

taenia f (plural taenias)

  1. taenia
  2. Alternative spelling of ténia

Further reading

  • “taenia” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

Latin

Etymology

From Ancient Greek ταινία (tainía, ribbon, tape).

Pronunciation

  • (Classical) IPA(key): /ˈtae̯.ni.a/, [ˈt̪äe̯niä]
  • (Ecclesiastical) IPA(key): /ˈte.ni.a/, [ˈt̪ɛːniɑ]

Noun

taenia f (genitive taeniae); first declension

  1. ribbon
  2. tapeworm
  3. taenia (band between the frieze and architrave in the Doric order)
  4. ribbonfish (Trachipterus spp.)

Declension

First-declension noun.

References

  • taenia in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • taenia in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • taenia in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré Latin-Français, Hachette
  • taenia in The Perseus Project (1999) Perseus Encyclopedia[1]
  • taenia in Harry Thurston Peck, editor (1898) Harper’s Dictionary of Classical Antiquities, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • taenia in William Smith et al., editor (1890) A Dictionary of Greek and Roman Antiquities, London: William Wayte. G. E. Marindin

Anagrams

  • antiae

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