filter vs percolate what difference

what is difference between filter and percolate

English

Etymology

From Middle English filtre, from Medieval Latin filtrum (compare also Old French feutre (felt; filter)), from Frankish *filtir, from Proto-West Germanic *felt. See felt.

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /ˈfɪltə/
  • (General American) IPA(key): /ˈfɪltɚ/
  • Rhymes: -ɪltə(ɹ)
  • Homophone: philter

Noun

filter (plural filters)

  1. A device which separates a suspended, dissolved, or particulate matter from a fluid, solution, or other substance; any device that separates one substance from another.
  2. Electronics or software that separates unwanted signals (for example noise) from wanted signals or that attenuates selected frequencies.
  3. Any item, mechanism, device or procedure that acts to separate or isolate.
  4. (figuratively) self-restraint in speech.
  5. (mathematics, order theory) A non-empty upper set (of a partially ordered set) which is closed under binary infima (a.k.a. meets).
    The collection of cofinite subsets of is a filter under inclusion: it includes the intersection of every pair of its members, and includes every superset of every cofinite set.
    If (1) the universal set (here, the set of natural numbers) were called a “large” set, (2) the superset of any “large” set were also a “large” set, and (3) the intersection of a pair of “large” sets were also a “large” set, then the set of all “large” sets would form a filter.

Antonyms

  • (order theory): ideal

Hyponyms

Derived terms

  • clear-filter
  • filter bed
  • highpass filter
  • filtrand
  • filtrate
  • (order theory): ultrafilter

Descendants

  • Japanese: フィルター (firutā)
  • Korean: 필터 (pilteo)

Translations

Verb

filter (third-person singular simple present filters, present participle filtering, simple past and past participle filtered)

  1. (transitive) To sort, sift, or isolate.
    • This strainer should filter out the large particles.
  2. (transitive) To diffuse; to cause to be less concentrated or focused.
    • The leaves of the trees filtered the light.
  3. (intransitive) To pass through a filter or to act as though passing through a filter.
    • The water filtered through the rock and soil.
  4. (intransitive) To move slowly or gradually; to come or go a few at a time.
    • The crowd filtered into the theater.
  5. (intransitive) To ride a motorcycle between lanes on a road
    • I can skip past all the traffic on my bike by filtering.

Synonyms

  • (to sort, sift, or isolate) to filter out (something)

Translations

Related terms

  • filtrate
  • filtration
  • filtride

Anagrams

  • Trefil, filtre, firtle, lifter, relift, trifle

Danish

Noun

filter n (singular definite filtret or filteret, plural indefinite filtre)

  1. filter

Inflection


Dutch

Etymology

Borrowed from French filtre or German Filter, from Latin filtrum.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈfɪl.tər/
  • Hyphenation: fil‧ter

Noun

filter m or n (plural filters, diminutive filtertje n)

  1. A filter (dense mesh or fabric used for filtration).
  2. A cigarette filter.
  3. A light filter.
  4. A camera filter.

Usage notes

The word is masculine in Belgium, chiefly neuter but sometimes masculine in the Netherlands.

Derived terms

  • filtreren
  • filterkoffie
  • koffiefilter
  • luchtfilter
  • sigarettenfilter
  • uv-filter
  • waterfilter

Related terms

  • filtratie
  • filtreren

Descendants

  • Afrikaans: filter
  • Indonesian: filter

References

Anagrams

  • flirte

German

Verb

filter

  1. inflection of filtern:
    1. first-person singular present
    2. singular imperative

Hungarian

Etymology

From German Filter, from Medieval Latin filtrum.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ˈfiltɛr]
  • Hyphenation: fil‧ter
  • Rhymes: -ɛr

Noun

filter

  1. filter (any device that separates one substance from another)
  2. cigarette filter

Declension

References


Indonesian

Etymology

From Dutch filter, from French filtre, from Medieval Latin filtrum (compare also Old French feutre (felt; filter)), from Frankish *filtir, from Proto-West Germanic *felt.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ˈfɪltər]
  • Hyphenation: fil‧têr

Noun

filter

  1. filter
    1. a device which separates a suspended, dissolved, or particulate matter from a fluid, solution, or other substance; any device that separates one substance from another.
    2. (electronics, physics) electronics or software that separates unwanted signals (for example noise) from wanted signals or that attenuates selected frequencies.

Synonyms

  • penyaring
  • penapis
  • tapis

Derived terms

  • memfilter (to filter)

Further reading

  • “filter” in Kamus Besar Bahasa Indonesia (KBBI) Daring, Jakarta: Badan Pengembangan dan Pembinaan Bahasa, Kementerian Pendidikan dan Kebudayaan Republik Indonesia, 2016.

Norwegian Bokmål

Etymology

From French filtre

Noun

filter n (definite singular filteret or filtret, indefinite plural filter or filtre, definite plural filtra or filtrene)

  1. filter

Derived terms

  • kaffefilter
  • luftfilter

Related terms

  • filtrere

References

  • “filter” in The Bokmål Dictionary.

Norwegian Nynorsk

Etymology

From French filtre

Noun

filter n (definite singular filteret, indefinite plural filter, definite plural filtera)

  1. filter

Derived terms

  • luftfilter

References

  • “filter” in The Nynorsk Dictionary.

Serbo-Croatian

Alternative forms

  • fìltar

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /fǐlter/
  • Hyphenation: fil‧ter

Noun

fìlter m (Cyrillic spelling фѝлтер)

  1. filter

Swedish

Noun

filter n

  1. A filter.

Declension

Anagrams

  • fertil


English

Etymology

From Latin percōlō (I filter), itself, from per (through) + cōlō (I strain) (from cōlum (a strainer), of unknown origin).

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /ˈpɜːkəleɪt/
  • (US) IPA(key): /ˈpəɹkəleɪt/

Verb

percolate (third-person singular simple present percolates, present participle percolating, simple past and past participle percolated)

  1. (transitive) To pass a liquid through a porous substance; to filter.
  2. (intransitive) To drain or seep through a porous substance.
    Water percolates through sand.
  3. (transitive) To make (coffee) in a percolator.
    I’ll percolate some coffee.
  4. (intransitive, figuratively) To spread slowly or gradually; to slowly become noticed or realised.
    Reports on the pitiful state of many prisons have finally percolated through to the Home Office, which has promised to look into the situation.
    Through media reports it percolated to the surface that the police investigation was profoundly flawed.

Related terms

  • percolation
  • percolator
  • colander

Translations

Noun

percolate (plural percolates)

  1. (rare) A liquid that has been percolated.

Translations

Anagrams

  • prelocate

Italian

Verb

percolate

  1. inflection of percolare:
    1. second-person plural present indicative
    2. second-person plural imperative
  2. feminine plural of percolato

Latin

Verb

percōlāte

  1. second-person plural present active imperative of percōlō

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