filter vs strain what difference

what is difference between filter and strain

English

Etymology

From Middle English filtre, from Medieval Latin filtrum (compare also Old French feutre (felt; filter)), from Frankish *filtir, from Proto-West Germanic *felt. See felt.

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /ˈfɪltə/
  • (General American) IPA(key): /ˈfɪltɚ/
  • Rhymes: -ɪltə(ɹ)
  • Homophone: philter

Noun

filter (plural filters)

  1. A device which separates a suspended, dissolved, or particulate matter from a fluid, solution, or other substance; any device that separates one substance from another.
  2. Electronics or software that separates unwanted signals (for example noise) from wanted signals or that attenuates selected frequencies.
  3. Any item, mechanism, device or procedure that acts to separate or isolate.
  4. (figuratively) self-restraint in speech.
  5. (mathematics, order theory) A non-empty upper set (of a partially ordered set) which is closed under binary infima (a.k.a. meets).
    The collection of cofinite subsets of is a filter under inclusion: it includes the intersection of every pair of its members, and includes every superset of every cofinite set.
    If (1) the universal set (here, the set of natural numbers) were called a “large” set, (2) the superset of any “large” set were also a “large” set, and (3) the intersection of a pair of “large” sets were also a “large” set, then the set of all “large” sets would form a filter.

Antonyms

  • (order theory): ideal

Hyponyms

Derived terms

  • clear-filter
  • filter bed
  • highpass filter
  • filtrand
  • filtrate
  • (order theory): ultrafilter

Descendants

  • Japanese: フィルター (firutā)
  • Korean: 필터 (pilteo)

Translations

Verb

filter (third-person singular simple present filters, present participle filtering, simple past and past participle filtered)

  1. (transitive) To sort, sift, or isolate.
    • This strainer should filter out the large particles.
  2. (transitive) To diffuse; to cause to be less concentrated or focused.
    • The leaves of the trees filtered the light.
  3. (intransitive) To pass through a filter or to act as though passing through a filter.
    • The water filtered through the rock and soil.
  4. (intransitive) To move slowly or gradually; to come or go a few at a time.
    • The crowd filtered into the theater.
  5. (intransitive) To ride a motorcycle between lanes on a road
    • I can skip past all the traffic on my bike by filtering.

Synonyms

  • (to sort, sift, or isolate) to filter out (something)

Translations

Related terms

  • filtrate
  • filtration
  • filtride

Anagrams

  • Trefil, filtre, firtle, lifter, relift, trifle

Danish

Noun

filter n (singular definite filtret or filteret, plural indefinite filtre)

  1. filter

Inflection


Dutch

Etymology

Borrowed from French filtre or German Filter, from Latin filtrum.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈfɪl.tər/
  • Hyphenation: fil‧ter

Noun

filter m or n (plural filters, diminutive filtertje n)

  1. A filter (dense mesh or fabric used for filtration).
  2. A cigarette filter.
  3. A light filter.
  4. A camera filter.

Usage notes

The word is masculine in Belgium, chiefly neuter but sometimes masculine in the Netherlands.

Derived terms

  • filtreren
  • filterkoffie
  • koffiefilter
  • luchtfilter
  • sigarettenfilter
  • uv-filter
  • waterfilter

Related terms

  • filtratie
  • filtreren

Descendants

  • Afrikaans: filter
  • Indonesian: filter

References

Anagrams

  • flirte

German

Verb

filter

  1. inflection of filtern:
    1. first-person singular present
    2. singular imperative

Hungarian

Etymology

From German Filter, from Medieval Latin filtrum.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ˈfiltɛr]
  • Hyphenation: fil‧ter
  • Rhymes: -ɛr

Noun

filter

  1. filter (any device that separates one substance from another)
  2. cigarette filter

Declension

References


Indonesian

Etymology

From Dutch filter, from French filtre, from Medieval Latin filtrum (compare also Old French feutre (felt; filter)), from Frankish *filtir, from Proto-West Germanic *felt.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ˈfɪltər]
  • Hyphenation: fil‧têr

Noun

filter

  1. filter
    1. a device which separates a suspended, dissolved, or particulate matter from a fluid, solution, or other substance; any device that separates one substance from another.
    2. (electronics, physics) electronics or software that separates unwanted signals (for example noise) from wanted signals or that attenuates selected frequencies.

Synonyms

  • penyaring
  • penapis
  • tapis

Derived terms

  • memfilter (to filter)

Further reading

  • “filter” in Kamus Besar Bahasa Indonesia (KBBI) Daring, Jakarta: Badan Pengembangan dan Pembinaan Bahasa, Kementerian Pendidikan dan Kebudayaan Republik Indonesia, 2016.

Norwegian Bokmål

Etymology

From French filtre

Noun

filter n (definite singular filteret or filtret, indefinite plural filter or filtre, definite plural filtra or filtrene)

  1. filter

Derived terms

  • kaffefilter
  • luftfilter

Related terms

  • filtrere

References

  • “filter” in The Bokmål Dictionary.

Norwegian Nynorsk

Etymology

From French filtre

Noun

filter n (definite singular filteret, indefinite plural filter, definite plural filtera)

  1. filter

Derived terms

  • luftfilter

References

  • “filter” in The Nynorsk Dictionary.

Serbo-Croatian

Alternative forms

  • fìltar

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /fǐlter/
  • Hyphenation: fil‧ter

Noun

fìlter m (Cyrillic spelling фѝлтер)

  1. filter

Swedish

Noun

filter n

  1. A filter.

Declension

Anagrams

  • fertil


English

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /stɹeɪ̯n/
  • Rhymes: -eɪn

Etymology 1

From Middle English streen, strene, streon, istreon (race, stock, generation), from Old English strēon, ġestrēon (gain, wealth), from Proto-Germanic *streuną (heap, treasure, profit, gain), from Proto-Indo-European *strew- (to spread, strew) (cognate with Old Saxon gistriuni, Old High German gistriuni (gain, property, wealth, business), Latin strues (heap)). Confused in Middle English with the related noun strend, strynd, strund, from Old English strȳnd (race; stock), from strēonan, strȳnan (to beget; acquire). Related also to Dutch struinen (to prowl, root about, rout).

Noun

strain (plural strains)

  1. (archaic) Race; lineage, pedigree.
  2. (biology) A particular variety of a microbe, virus, or other organism, usually a taxonomically infraspecific one.
  3. (figuratively) Hereditary character, quality, tendency, or disposition.
    Synonyms: propensity, proneness
    • a. 1694, John Tillotson, The Advantages of Religion to Societies
      Intemperance and lust breed diseases, which being propogated, spoil the strain of a nation.
  4. (music, poetry) Any sustained note or movement; a song; a distinct portion of an ode or other poem; also, the pervading note, or burden, of a song, poem, etc.
    Synonyms: theme, motive, manner, style
  5. Language that is eloquent, poetic, or otherwise heightened.
    (The addition of quotations indicative of this usage is being sought:)
  6. (rare) A kind or sort (of person etc.).
  7. (obsolete) Treasure.
  8. (obsolete) The blood-vessel in the yolk of an egg.
Translations
Related terms
  • strew

Etymology 2

From Middle English straynen, streinen, streynen, from Old French estreindre (whence French étreindre (to grip)), from Latin stringere (to draw tight together, to tie).

Verb

strain (third-person singular simple present strains, present participle straining, simple past and past participle strained)

  1. (obsolete) To hold tightly, to clasp.
    • 1590, Edmund Spenser, The Faerie Queene, III.ii:
      So hauing said, her twixt her armes twaine / She straightly straynd, and colled tenderly []
    • Evander with a close embrace / Strained his departing friend.
    • 1859, Ferna Vale, Natalie; or, A Gem Among the Sea-Weeds
      “Farewell!”—the mother strained her child to her heart again, and again put her from her, to embrace her more closely.
  2. To apply a force or forces to by stretching out.
  3. To damage by drawing, stretching, or the exertion of force.
  4. To act upon, in any way, so as to cause change of form or volume, as when bending a beam.
  5. To exert or struggle (to do something), especially to stretch (one’s senses, faculties etc.) beyond what is normal or comfortable.
    • They strain their warbling throats / To welcome in the spring.
    • 1898, J. Meade Falkner, Moonfleet Chapter 4
      Thus my plight was evil indeed, for I had nothing now to burn to give me light, and knew that ’twas no use setting to grout till I could see to go about it. Moreover, the darkness was of that black kind that is never found beneath the open sky, no, not even on the darkest night, but lurks in close and covered places and strains the eyes in trying to see into it.
  6. To stretch beyond its proper limit; to do violence to, in terms of intent or meaning.
    • 1724, Jonathan Swift, Drapier’s Letters, 4
      There can be no other meaning in this expression, however some may pretend to strain it.
  7. (transitive) To separate solid from liquid by passing through a strainer or colander
  8. (intransitive) To percolate; to be filtered.
  9. To make uneasy or unnatural; to produce with apparent effort; to force; to constrain.
  10. To urge with importunity; to press.
  11. (transitive) hug somebody; to hold somebody tightly.
Derived terms
  • strainer
  • strain every nerve
Translations

Noun

strain (countable and uncountable, plural strains)

  1. The act of straining, or the state of being strained.
    • 1832, Charles Stewart Drewry (A.M.I.C.E.), A memoir on suspension bridges, page 183:
      If the Menai Bridge, for instance, were loaded at that rate, the entire strain on the main chains would be about 2000 tons ; while the chains containing 260 square inches of iron would bear, at 9 tons per square inch, 2340 tons, without stretching  …
    • 2004, Sanjay Shrivastava, Medical Device Materials: Proceedings from the Materials & Processes for Medical Devices Conference 2003, 8-10 September 2003, Anaheim, California, ASM International (→ISBN), page 176:
      Therefore, the goal of this study is to assess the influence of strain on the corrosion resistance of passivated Nitinol and stainless steel implant materials. Materials and Methods Nitinol (50.8%at. Ni) wire (NDC, Fremont, CA) and 316L stainless …
  2. A violent effort; an excessive and hurtful exertion or tension, as of the muscles.
  3. An injury resulting from violent effort; a sprain.
  4. (uncountable, engineering) A dimensionless measure of object deformation either referring to engineering strain or true strain.
  5. (obsolete) The track of a deer.
    • 1624, John Smith, Generall Historie, in Kupperman 1988, p. 145:
      When they have shot a Deere by land, they follow him like bloud-hounds by the bloud, and straine, and oftentimes so take them.
Derived terms
  • breaking strain

Translations

Related terms

  • stress
  • strict
  • stringent

Etymology 3

From Middle English strenen (to beget, father, procreate), from Old English strēonan, strīenan, strȳnan (to beget, generate, gain, acquire), from Proto-Germanic *striunijaną (to furnish, decorate, acquire).

Verb

strain (third-person singular simple present strains, present participle straining, simple past and past participle strained)

  1. (obsolete) To beget, generate (of light), engender, copulate (both of animals and humans), lie with, be born, come into the world.

Anagrams

  • Sartin, Tarins, Trains, atrins, instar, santir, sartin, starin’, tairns, tarins, trains

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