find vs witness what difference

what is difference between find and witness

English

Etymology

From Middle English finden, from Old English findan, from Proto-West Germanic *finþan, from Proto-Germanic *finþaną (compare West Frisian fine, Low German finden, Dutch vinden, German finden, Danish finde, Norwegian Bokmål finne, Norwegian Nynorsk and Swedish finna), a secondary verb from Proto-Indo-European *pent- (to go, pass; path bridge), *póntoh₁s (compare English path, Old Irish étain (I find), áitt (place), Latin pōns (bridge), Ancient Greek πόντος (póntos, sea), Old Armenian հուն (hun, ford), Avestan ????????????????????(paṇtā̊), Sanskrit पथ (pathá, path)), Proto-Slavic *pǫtь.

Pronunciation

  • enPR: fīnd, IPA(key): /faɪnd/
  • Rhymes: -aɪnd
  • Homophone: fined

Verb

find (third-person singular simple present finds, present participle finding, simple past found or (dialectal) fand, past participle found or (archaic) founden)

  1. (transitive) To encounter or discover by accident; to happen upon.
    • a. 1667, Abraham Cowley, The Request
      Among the Woods and Forests thou art found.
  2. (transitive) To encounter or discover something being searched for; to locate.
  3. (ditransitive) To discover by study or experiment direct to an object or end.
  4. (transitive) To gain, as the object of desire or effort.
  5. (transitive) To attain to; to arrive at; to acquire.
  6. (transitive) To point out.
  7. (ditransitive) To decide that, to discover that, to form the opinion that.
    • 1647, Abraham Cowley, The Request
      The torrid zone is now found habitable.
  8. (transitive) To arrive at, as a conclusion; to determine as true; to establish.
  9. (transitive, archaic) To supply; to furnish.
  10. (transitive, archaic) To provide for
    • 1871, Charles Kingsley, At Last: a Christmas in the West Indies
      Nothing a day and find yourself.
    • 1892, W. E. Swanton, Notes on New Zealand
      the pay is good, the musterer receiving ten shillings a day, and all found, all the time he is engaged on the “run,” even should he be compelled to remain idle on account of rain or mist.
  11. (intransitive, law) To determine or judge.
  12. (intransitive, hunting) To discover game.
    • 1945, Nancy Mitford, The Pursuit of Love, Penguin 2010, page 57:
      They found at once, and there was a short sharp run, during which Linda and Tony, both in a somewhat showing-off mood, rode side by side over the stone walls.

Synonyms

  • See also Thesaurus:deem

Antonyms

  • lose

Derived terms

  • befind
  • findable
  • finder
  • hard-to-find
  • viewfinder
  • unfindable

Related terms

See also finding and found

Translations

Noun

find (plural finds)

  1. Anything that is found (usually valuable), as objects on an archeological site or a person with talent.
  2. The act of finding.
    (Can we add an example for this sense?)

Synonyms

  • (anything found): discovery, catch

Translations

Further reading

  • find in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.
  • find in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.

Anagrams

  • NFID

Danish

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /fend/, [fenˀ]
  • Rhymes: -end

Verb

find

  1. imperative of finde

Middle English

Noun

find (plural findes)

  1. Alternative form of feend


English

Alternative forms

  • (archaic) witnesse

Etymology

From Middle English witnesse, from Old English ġewitnes, equivalent to wit +‎ -ness. Cognate with Middle Dutch wetenisse (witness, testimony), Old High German gewiznessi (testimony), literary German gewissen (to witness), Icelandic vitni (witness).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈwɪtnəs/, /ˈwɪtnɪs/
  • Rhymes: -ɪtnəs, -ɪtnɪs
  • Hyphenation: wit‧ness

Noun

witness (countable and uncountable, plural witnesses)

  1. (uncountable) Attestation of a fact or event; testimony.
    She can bear witness, since she was there at the time.
    • c. 1597, William Shakespeare, The Merry Wives of Windsor, Act IV, Scene ii[1]:
      May we, with the warrant of womanhood and the witness of a good conscience, pursue him with any further revenge?
  2. (countable) One who sees or has personal knowledge of something.
    As a witness to the event, I can confirm that he really said that.
    • c. 1589-93, William Shakespeare, The Two Gentlemen of Verona, Act IV, Scene ii[7]:
      [] thyself art witness— I am betrothed.
    • c. 1786, Robert Hall, A Reverie
      Upon my looking round, I was a witness to appearances which filled me with melancholy and regret.
  3. (countable, law) Someone called to give evidence in a court.
  4. (countable) One who is called upon to witness an event or action, such as a wedding or the signing of a document.
  5. (countable) Something that serves as evidence; a sign or token.
    • Laban said to Jacob, [] This heap be witness, and this pillar be witness.

Derived terms

Translations

Verb

witness (third-person singular simple present witnesses, present participle witnessing, simple past and past participle witnessed)

  1. (transitive) To furnish proof of, to show.
    This certificate witnesses his presence on that day.
  2. (transitive) To take as evidence.
  3. (transitive) To see or gain knowledge of through experience.
    • 1801, Robert Hall, On Modern Infidelity
      This is but a faint sketch of the incalculable calamities and horrors we must expect, should we be so unfortunate as ever to witness the triumph of modern infidelity
    • 1803 (first published), John Marshall, The Life of George Washington
      General Washington did not live to witness the restoration of peace.
  4. (intransitive, construed with to or for) To present personal religious testimony; to preach at (someone) or on behalf of.
    • 1998, “Niebuhr, Reinhold”, Routledge Encyclopedia of Philosophy, volume 6, page 842
      Instead, Niebuhr’s God was the God witnessed to in the Hebrew Scriptures and the New Testament, the Bible of the Christian world.
  5. To see the execution of (a legal instrument), and subscribe it for the purpose of establishing its authenticity.

Synonyms

  • certify

Translations

Anagrams

  • wisents

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