finish vs polish what difference

what is difference between finish and polish

English

Etymology

From Middle English finishen, finisshen, finischen, from Old French finiss-, stem of some of the conjugated forms of finir, from Latin fīnīre, present active infinitive of fīniō.

Pronunciation

  • enPR: fĭn’ĭsh, IPA(key): /ˈfɪnɪʃ/
  • Homophone: Finnish

Noun

finish (plural finishes)

  1. An end; the end of anything.
  2. A protective coating given to wood or metal and other surfaces.
  3. The result of any process changing the physical or chemical properties of cloth.
  4. A finishing touch; careful elaboration; polish.
  5. (sports) A shot on goal, especially one that ends in a goal.

Translations

Verb

finish (third-person singular simple present finishes, present participle finishing, simple past and past participle finished)

  1. (transitive) To complete (something).
  2. (transitive) To apply a treatment to (a surface or similar).
  3. (transitive) To change an animal’s food supply in the months before it is due for slaughter, with the intention of fattening the animal.
  4. (intransitive) To come to an end.
  5. (transitive) To put an end to; to destroy.
    These rumours could finish your career.
  6. (intransitive, sex) To reach orgasm.

Usage notes

  • (transitive, to complete): This is a catenative verb that takes the gerund (the -ing form). See Appendix:English catenative verbs

Antonyms

  • (to complete): initiate, begin, start

Derived terms

  • nice guys finish last

Translations

Related terms

  • finish line
  • finishing school

Anagrams

  • fishin’

Danish

Etymology

From English finish.

Noun

finish c (singular definite finishen, not used in plural form)

  1. (the appearance after) fine-tuning, finishing touch
  2. finish (a spectacular end in a race or a competition)

Further reading

  • “finish” in Den Danske Ordbog

Dutch

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈfɪ.nɪʃ/
  • Hyphenation: fi‧nish

Etymology 1

Borrowed from English finish.

Noun

finish m (uncountable)

  1. finish; end
Derived terms
  • finishlijn

Etymology 2

See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

Verb

finish

  1. first-person singular present indicative of finishen
  2. imperative of finishen


English

Etymology

From Middle English polishen, from Old French poliss-, stem of some of the conjugated forms of polir, from Latin polīre (to polish, make smooth).

Pronunciation

  • (UK) enPR: pŏ’lĭsh, IPA(key): /ˈpɒlɪʃ/
  • (US) enPR: pä’lĭsh, IPA(key): /ˈpɑlɪʃ/

Noun

polish (countable and uncountable, plural polishes)

  1. A substance used to polish.
  2. Cleanliness; smoothness, shininess.
  3. Refinement; cleanliness in performance or presentation.

Synonyms

  • (substance): wax
  • (smoothness, shininess): finish, sheen, shine, shininess, smoothness
  • (cleanliness in performance or presentation): class, elegance, panache, refinement, style

Derived terms

  • depolish
  • expolish
  • repolish

Related terms

  • polissoir

Translations

See also

  • apple-polish
  • French polish
  • furniture polish
  • glacial polish
  • nail polish
  • polish remover
  • shoe polish
  • spit and polish
  • stove polish
  • varnish polish

Verb

polish (third-person singular simple present polishes, present participle polishing, simple past and past participle polished)

  1. (transitive) To shine; to make a surface very smooth or shiny by rubbing, cleaning, or grinding.
  2. (transitive) To refine; remove imperfections from.
    • 1699, William Temple, Heads designed for an essay on conversations
      Study gives strength to the mind; conversation, grace: the first apt to give stiffness, the other suppleness: one gives substance and form to the statue, the other polishes it.
  3. (transitive) To apply shoe polish to shoes.
  4. (intransitive) To become smooth, as from friction; to receive a gloss; to take a smooth and glossy surface.
    • a. 1626, Francis Bacon, Inquisitions touching the compounding of metals
      The other [gold], whether it will polish so well Wherein for the latter [brass] it is probable it will
  5. (transitive) To refine; to wear off the rudeness, coarseness, or rusticity of; to make elegant and polite.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Milton to this entry?)

Synonyms

  • (to make smooth and shiny by rubbing): wax, shine, buff, furbish, burnish, smooth, bone
  • (refine): hone, perfect, refine

Derived terms

  • polishable
  • polished
  • polisher
  • polishing
  • polishment
  • polishure
  • repolish
  • unpolish

Related terms

  • polite

Translations

See also

  • interpolish
  • polish off
  • polish up, polish up on

Further reading

  • polish in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.
  • polish in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.
  • polish at OneLook Dictionary Search

Anagrams

  • Hislop, philos

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