fireman vs stoker what difference

what is difference between fireman and stoker

English

Etymology

fire +‎ -man

Pronunciation

  • (General American) IPA(key): /ˈfaɪɹmən/
  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /ˈfaɪəmən/
  • Hyphenation: fire‧man

Noun

fireman (plural firemen)

  1. (firefighting) Someone (especially one who is male) who is skilled in the work of fighting fire.
    • 1993, Nancy F. Cott (editor), History of Women in the United States. Historical Articles on Women’s Lives and Activities. 15. Women and War, page 432:
      By February 1944 there were over two thousand women employed at the Alabama Dry Dock and Shipbuilding Company […]. There were also female firemen on almost every shipyard crane […].
    • 30 June 2019, Don’t call us for cats stuck in trees, Fire Brigade warns (Daily Telegraph)
      For firemen everywhere rescuing cats from trees has been as much a part of the job as tackling blazing buildings.
    Synonyms: firefighter, smoke eater
    Hyponyms: firewoman, hotshot, smokejumper
  2. (rail transport, nautical) A person (originally a man) who keeps the fire going underneath a steam boiler (originally, shoveling coal by hand), particularly on a railroad locomotive or steamship.
    • ca. 1913 The wreck of Old 97 [ballad, Blue Ridge Mountains], verse 3:
      He looked around his cab at his black greasy fireman, saying ‘shovel on a little more coal, and when we cross that White Oak Mountain, you can watch Old 97 roll’.
    • 1938, Xavier Herbert, Capricornia, Chapter IX, p. 140, [1]
      No grass grew under a train when the engineer let Fireman McLash take the throttle.
    Synonym: (informal) bakehead
  3. (rail transport, by extension) An assistant on any locomotive, whether steam-powered or not.
  4. (baseball) A relief pitcher.
  5. (mining, historical) A safety inspector in coal mines.

Usage notes

  • (firefighting): Historically only a man, but now used to refer to female firefighters as well. In modern usage, the gender-inclusive term firefighter is generally preferred.
  • (rail transport): This term is commonly used for both males and females, firewoman is rarer in this sense.

Derived terms

Related terms

Translations

See also

  • tillerman
  • stoker

Anagrams

  • feminar, inframe


English

Etymology

From Middle Dutch stoker (stoker), from Middle Dutch stoken (to stoke, incite, literally to poke, jab, thrust), ultimately equivalent to stoke +‎ -er. More at stoke.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈstəʊkə(ɹ)/

Noun

stoker (plural stokers)

  1. A person who stokes, especially one on a steamship pr steam train who stokes coal in the boilers.
    • 1953, Samuel Beckett, Watt
      For this was a line so little frequented, especially at this hour, when the driver, the stoker, the guard and the station staffs all along the line, were anhelating towards their wives, after the long hours of continence, that the train would hardly draw up, when it would be off again, like a bouncing ball.
  2. A device for stoking a fire; a poker.
  3. A device that feeds coal into a furnace etc automatically.
  4. A person who pedals on the back of a tandem bicycle.

Synonyms

  • (fireplace utensil): firestick, poker

Derived terms

  • mechanical stoker

Translations

See also

  • fireman

Anagrams

  • Kortes, Koster, stroke, tokers, trokes

Dutch

Etymology

From Middle Dutch stoker. Equivalent to stoken +‎ -er.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈstoː.kər/, (Southern Dutch) [ˈstoː.kər], (Northern Dutch) [ˈstoʊ̯.kər]
  • Hyphenation: sto‧ker
  • Rhymes: -oːkər

Noun

stoker m (plural stokers, diminutive stokertje n)

  1. stoker, one who stokes fuel
  2. agitator, one who sows division or discord
    Synonyms: onruststoker, scheurmaker

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