firm vs solid what difference

what is difference between firm and solid

English

Pronunciation

  • (General American) IPA(key): /fɜɹm/, [fɝm]
  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /fɜːm/
  • Rhymes: -ɜː(ɹ)m

Etymology 1

From Italian firma (signature), from firmare (to sign), from Latin firmare (to make firm, to confirm (by signature)), from firmus (firm, stable). The contemporary sense developed in the 18th century simultaneously with German Firma (business, name of business). There are conflicting statements in the literature as to which of the two languages influenced which.

Noun

firm (plural firms)

  1. (Britain, business) A business partnership; the name under which it trades.
  2. (business, economics) A business enterprise, however organized.
  3. (slang) A criminal gang, especially based around football hooliganism.
Derived terms
  • The Firm
Translations

Etymology 2

From Middle English ferme, from Old French ferme, from Latin firmus (strong, steady). Doublet of dharma.

Adjective

firm (comparative firmer, superlative firmest)

  1. Steadfast, secure, solid (in position)
  2. Fixed (in opinion).
  3. Insistent upon something, not accepting dissent.
    He wanted to stay overnight, but I was firm with him and said he had to leave today.
  4. Durable, rigid (material state)
    firm flesh; firm muscles, firm wood; firm land (i.e. not soft and marshy)
Derived terms
Translations

Verb

firm (third-person singular simple present firms, present participle firming, simple past and past participle firmed)

  1. (transitive) To make firm or strong; fix securely.
  2. (transitive) To make compact or resistant to pressure; solidify.
  3. (intransitive) To become firm; stabilise.
  4. (intransitive) To improve after decline.
  5. (intransitive, Australia) To shorten (of betting odds).
  6. (transitive, Britain, slang) To select (a higher education institution) as one’s preferred choice, so as to enrol automatically if one’s grades match the conditional offer.
Translations

Further reading

  • Firm in the Encyclopædia Britannica (11th edition, 1911)

Anagrams

  • FRIM, fMRI, fmri, frim

German

Etymology

From Latin firmus.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /fɪʁm/

Adjective

firm (comparative firmer, superlative am firmsten)

  1. (somewhat dated) experienced, well versed

Declension

Further reading

  • “firm” in Duden online

Polish

Noun

firm f

  1. genitive plural of firma

Zoogocho Zapotec

Etymology 1

Borrowed from Spanish firma.

Noun

firm

  1. signature

Derived terms

  • chgoꞌo firm
  • choꞌo firm

Etymology 2

Borrowed from Spanish firme.

Adjective

firm

  1. firm, fixed

References

  • Long C., Rebecca; Cruz M., Sofronio (2000) Diccionario zapoteco de San Bartolomé Zoogocho, Oaxaca (Serie de vocabularios y diccionarios indígenas “Mariano Silva y Aceves”; 38)‎[2] (in Spanish), second electronic edition, Coyoacán, D.F.: Instituto Lingüístico de Verano, A.C., pages 220


English

Etymology

From Middle English solide, borrowed from Old French solide (as an adjective), from Latin solidus (solid), from Proto-Indo-European *solh₂-i-dʰ-o-s (entire), suffixed form of root *solh₂- (integrate, whole). Doublet of sol, sold, soldo, solidus, and sou.

Pronunciation

  • (General American) enPR: sŏl’ĭd, IPA(key): /ˈsɑlɪd/
  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /ˈsɒlɪd/

Adjective

solid (comparative more solid, superlative most solid)

  1. (of an object or substance) That can be picked up or held, having a texture, and usually firm. Unlike a liquid or a gas.
  2. Large in size, quantity, or value.
    Synonyms: massive, substantial
  3. Lacking holes, hollows or admixtures of other materials.
  4. Strong or unyielding.
  5. (slang) Excellent, of high quality, or reliable.
  6. Hearty; filling.
  7. Worthy of credit, trust, or esteem; substantial; not frivolous or fallacious.
    • 1875-1886, J. A. Symonds, Renaissance in Italy: The revival of learning
      The genius of the Italians wrought by solid toil what the myth-making imagination of the Germans had projected in a poem.
  8. Financially well off; wealthy.
  9. Sound; not weak.
  10. (typography) Written as one word, without spaces or hyphens.
    Synonyms: (as in closed compound) closed, closed up
    Coordinate terms: hyphenation (noun), writing as separate words (noun)
  11. (printing, dated) Not having the lines separated by leads; not open.
  12. (US, politics, slang) United; without division; unanimous.
  13. Of a single color throughout.
  14. (of drawn lines) Continuous; unbroken; not dotted or dashed.
  15. (dated) Having all the geometrical dimensions; cubic.
  16. (of volumes of materials) Measured as a single solid, as the volumes of individual pieces added together without any gaps.
    Coordinate terms: loose, stacked

Hyponyms

  • rock solid

Derived terms

Related terms

Translations

Noun

solid (plural solids)

  1. (chemistry) A substance in the fundamental state of matter that retains its size and shape without need of a container (as opposed to a liquid or gas).
  2. (geometry) A three-dimensional figure (as opposed to a surface, an area, or a curve).
  3. (informal) A favor.
    Please do me a solid: lend me your car for one week.
    I owe him; he did me a solid last year.
  4. An article of clothing which is of a single color throughout.
    I prefer solids over paisleys.
  5. (in the plural) Food which is not liquid-based.
    The doctor said I can’t eat any solids four hours before the operation.

Translations

Adverb

solid (comparative more solid, superlative most solid)

  1. Solidly.
  2. (not comparable, typography) Without spaces or hyphens.
    Many long-established compounds are set solid.

References

  • solid at OneLook Dictionary Search

Anagrams

  • diols, idols, lidos, loids, sloid, soldi

Danish

Adjective

solid

  1. solid, robust
  2. strong
  3. substantial
  4. reliable

German

Alternative forms

  • solide (both are roughly equally common)

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /zoˈliːt/

Adjective

solid (comparative solider, superlative am solidesten)

  1. solid

Declension

Further reading

  • “solid” in Duden online

Occitan

Etymology

Borrowed from Latin solidus.

Adjective

solid m (feminine singular solida, masculine plural solids, feminine plural solidas)

  1. solid

Further reading

  • Joan de Cantalausa (2006) Diccionari general occitan a partir dels parlars lengadocians, 2 edition, →ISBN, page 923.

Romanian

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /soˈlid/

Etymology 1

Borrowed from French solide, Latin solidus.

Adjective

solid m or n (feminine singular solidă, masculine plural solizi, feminine and neuter plural solide)

  1. solid, firm
Synonyms
  • tare
Related terms
  • soliditate

Etymology 2

Borrowed from Latin solidus. Cf. also solz, possibly a doublet (unless it comes from Proto-Slavic).

Noun

solid m (plural solizi)

  1. a solidus (Roman gold coin)

Further reading

  • solid in DEX online – Dicționare ale limbii române (Dictionaries of the Romanian language)

Swedish

Pronunciation

  • Rhymes: -iːd

Adjective

solid

  1. solid, massive, stable, reliable
  2. solvent, in good financial standing

Declension

Related terms

  • soliditet

Noun

solid c

  1. (geometry) a solid body

Declension

Anagrams

  • lodis

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