fit vs scene what difference

what is difference between fit and scene

English

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /fɪt/
  • Rhymes: -ɪt

Etymology 1

Possibly from Middle English fit (an adversary of equal power).

Adjective

fit (comparative fitter, superlative fittest)

  1. Suitable, proper.
    • 1902, John Buchan, The Outgoing of the Tide
      He had drunk more than was fit for him, and he was singing some light song, when he saw approaching, as he said, the pale horse mentioned in the Revelation, with Death seated as the rider.
  2. Adapted to a purpose or environment.
  3. In good shape; physically well.
  4. (Britain, informal, chiefly slang) Sexually attractive; good-looking; fanciable.
  5. Prepared; ready.
    • So fit to shoot, she singled forth among her foes who first her quarry’s strength should feel.
Derived terms
Translations

Verb

fit (third-person singular simple present fits, present participle fitting, simple past and past participle fitted or fit)

  1. (transitive) To be suitable for.
    • 1918, Richard Dennis Teall Hollister, Speech-making, publ. George Wahr, pg. 81:
      The speaker should be certain that his subject fits the occasion.
  2. (transitive) To conform to in size and shape.
  3. (intransitive) To be of the right size and shape
    • 2016 February 2, Kate Winslet & al., Jimmy Kimmel Live!
      Even though in a way you let him freeze to death in the water, because the way I see it…
      I agree. Y’know, I think he actually could have fitted on that bit of door.
      There was plenty of room on the raft.
      I know. I know, I know.
  4. (transitive, with to) To make conform in size and shape.
    1. (transitive) To tailor; to change to the appropriate size.
  5. (transitive) To be in agreement with.
  6. (transitive) To adjust.
  7. (transitive) To attach, especially when requiring exact positioning or sizing.
  8. (transitive) To equip or supply.
  9. (transitive) To make ready.
  10. (intransitive, archaic) To be seemly.
  11. To be proper or becoming.
  12. (intransitive) To be in harmony.
Usage notes
  • In senses 1 to 6, this is generally a stative verb that rarely takes the continuous inflection. See Category:English stative verbs
Derived terms
Translations

Noun

fit (plural fits)

  1. The degree to which something fits.
  2. Conformity of elements one to another.
  3. The part of an object upon which anything fits tightly.
  4. (advertising) Measure of how well a particular commercial execution captures the character or values of a brand.
  5. (statistics) Goodness of fit.
  6. (bridge) The quality of a partnership’s combined holding of cards in a suit, particularly of trump.
Usage notes

Usually used in the singular preceded by an indefinite article and an adjective.

Translations

References

  • (advertising): The Advertising Research Handbook Charles E. Young, Ideas in Flight, Seattle, Washington, April 2005

Etymology 2

Unknown, possibly from Old English fitt (song), or from the sense of fitted to length.

Noun

fit (plural fits)

  1. (archaic) A section of a poem or ballad.
    • 1771, Samuel Johnson, “Letter to Bennet Langton, Esq. (March 20),” in James Boswell, Life of Samuel Johnson (1791), vol 2:
      Dr. Percy has written a long ballad in many fits.

References

  • Oxford English Dictionary: fit, fyte n. 1

Etymology 3

Unknown, possibly from Old English fitt (conflict).
Probably cognate with Italian fitta (pain, especially sudden and stabbing pain).
See more at Latin fīgere.

Noun

fit (plural fits)

  1. A seizure or convulsion.
  2. (medicine) A sudden and vigorous appearance of a symptom over a short period of time.
  3. A sudden outburst of emotion.
    Synonyms: blowout, hissy, tantrum, spell, moment
  4. A sudden burst (of an activity).
    Synonyms: flurry, frenzy, paroxysm
Derived terms
Translations

Verb

fit (third-person singular simple present fits, present participle fitting, simple past and past participle fitted)

  1. (intransitive, medicine) To suffer a fit.
    • 2016, 18 May, Three dogs die and seven more ill after drinking from the same Kent lake amid contamination fears (in The Telegraph)
      A spokesman said: “It is believed they (the dogs) got into the lake and drank from it. They came out and started fitting. Shortly after that three of them died and vets are attempting to resuscitate the other one.”

Etymology 4

Verb

fit

  1. (African-American Vernacular, dated) Fought.
    • c. 19th century, unknown author, Joshua Fit the Battle of Jericho
      Joshua fit the battle of Jericho and the walls came tumbling down

Anagrams

  • ITF, TIF, if’t

Azerbaijani

Etymology

Of onomatopoetic origin.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [fit]

Noun

fit (definite accusative fiti, plural fitlər)

  1. whistle
  2. siren (a device that makes a piercingly loud sound as an alarm or signal, or the sound from such a device)

Declension

Derived terms

  • fit çalmaq (to whistle)

Catalan

Pronunciation

  • (Balearic, Central, Valencian) IPA(key): /ˈfit/
  • Rhymes: -it

Adjective

fit (feminine fita, masculine plural fits, feminine plural fites)

  1. fixed (of eyes, regard, etc.)

Noun

fit m (plural fits)

  1. target

Chinese

Etymology

Borrowed from English fit.

Pronunciation

Adjective

fit

  1. (Cantonese) fit (physically well; in good shape)

Czech

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ˈfɪt]

Adjective

fit

  1. fit, healthy

Usage notes

  • This adjective is indeclinable.

Further reading

  • fit in Příruční slovník jazyka českého, 1935–1957
  • fit in Slovník spisovného jazyka českého, 1960–1971, 1989

Dutch

Pronunciation

  • Rhymes: -ɪt

Adjective

fit (comparative fitter, superlative fitst)

  1. fit (in good shape)

Inflection


French

Pronunciation

Verb

fit

  1. third-person singular past historic of faire

German

Etymology

From English fit.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /fɪt/
  • Rhymes: -ɪt

Adjective

fit (comparative fitter, superlative am fittesten)

  1. fit (in good physical shape)

Declension

Derived terms

  • Fitmacher
  • Fitness (rarely Fitheit)

Icelandic

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /fɪːt/
  • Rhymes: -ɪːt

Noun

fit f (genitive singular fitjar, nominative plural fitjar)

  1. (zoology) web, interdigital webbing, a membrane that connects the digits of an animal
  2. (knitting) a casting on, casting on

Declension

Related terms

  • breiðafit
  • fitja
  • fuglafit
  • fuglsfit
  • gullfit
  • hundafit
  • lykkjufit
  • Halldórufit
  • silfurfit
  • skollafit
  • sundfit

Further reading

  • A deliberation on the word “fit” on the Stofnun Árna Magnússonar í íslenskum fræðum (“Árni Magnússon Institute for Icelandic Studies”)



Latin

Verb

fit

  1. third-person singular present passive indicative of faciō
  2. third-person singular present active indicative of fīō

Luxembourgish

Etymology

From English fit, probably through German fit.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /fit/
  • Rhymes: -it

Adjective

fit (masculine fitten, neuter fit, comparative méi fit, superlative am fitsten)

  1. fit (in good shape)

Norwegian Nynorsk

Etymology

From Old Norse fit.

Noun

fit f (definite singular fita or fiti, indefinite plural fitjar or fiter, definite plural fitjane or fitene)

  1. form removed with the spelling reform of 2012; superseded by fet

Old Norse

Noun

fit f (genitive fitjar, plural fitjar)

  1. (zoology, anatomy) webbed foot (of swimming birds)
  2. (zoology, anatomy) flippers (of a seal)
  3. (landform) meadowland on the banks of a lake or river

Declension

References

  • fit in Geir T. Zoëga (1910) A Concise Dictionary of Old Icelandic, Oxford: Clarendon Press

Scots

Etymology 1

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Noun

fit (plural fits)

  1. foot
  2. lower end (of a street, river, field etc)
Derived terms
  • fitbaw

Verb

fit (third-person singular present fits, present participle fitin, past fitt, past participle fitt)

  1. to foot

Etymology 2

See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

Pronoun

fit

  1. Doric form of what

Volapük

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [fit]

Noun

fit (nominative plural fits)

  1. (male or female) fish (cold-blooded vertebrate)

Declension

Derived terms

See also



English

Alternative forms

  • scæne (archaic)

Etymology

From Middle French scene, from Latin scaena, scēna, from Ancient Greek σκηνή (skēnḗ, scene, stage). Doublet of scena.

Pronunciation

  • enPR: sēn, IPA(key): /siːn/
  • Homophone: seen
  • Rhymes: -iːn

Noun

scene (plural scenes)

  1. The location of an event that attracts attention.
  2. (archaic, theater) the stage.
  3. (theater) The decorations; furnishings and backgrounds of a stage, representing the place in which the action of a play is set
  4. (theater, film, television, radio) A part of a dramatic work that is set in the same place or time. In the theatre, generally a number of scenes constitute an act.
  5. The location, time, circumstances, etc., in which something occurs, or in which the action of a story, play, or the like, is set up
    • c. 1810, John M. Mason, On Religious Controversy
      The world is a vast scene of strife.
  6. A combination of objects or events in view or happening at a given moment at a particular place.
    • Through what new scenes and changes must we pass!
  7. A landscape, or part of a landscape; scenery.
    • A sylvan scene with various greens was drawn, / Shades on the sides, and in the midst a lawn.
  8. An exhibition of passionate or strong feeling before others, creating embarrassment or disruption; often, an artificial or affected action, or course of action, done for effect; a theatrical display
    • 1832, Thomas De Quincey, Kolsterheim
      Probably no lover of scenes would have had very long to wait or some explosions between parties, both equally ready to take offence, and careless of giving it.
  9. An element of fiction writing.
  10. A social environment consisting of an informal, vague group of people with a uniting interest; their sphere of activity; a subculture.

Derived terms

Translations

See also

  • proscenium

Verb

scene (third-person singular simple present scenes, present participle scening, simple past and past participle scened)

  1. (transitive) To exhibit as a scene; to make a scene of; to display.

Anagrams

  • cenes, cense, sence

Danish

Etymology

Via Latin scaena from Ancient Greek σκηνή (skēnḗ, scene, stage).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /seːnə/, [ˈseːnə]
  • Homophone: sene

Noun

scene c (singular definite scenen, plural indefinite scener)

  1. stage (platform for performing in a theatre)
  2. scene (section of a film or a play)
  3. scene (a setting or a behaviour)

Inflection

Derived terms

  • iscenesætte
  • sceneri
  • sceneshow

Italian

Noun

scene f pl

  1. plural of scena

Middle French

Etymology

First known attestation 1486, borrowed from Latin scaena.

Noun

scene f

  1. stage (location where a play, etc., takes place)

References


Norwegian Bokmål

Alternative forms

  • sene

Etymology

From Ancient Greek σκηνή (skēnḗ, scene, stage), via Latin scaena

Noun

scene m (definite singular scenen, indefinite plural scener, definite plural scenene)

  1. a stage (in a theatre)
  2. a scene (in a film or play)

Derived terms

  • iscenesette
  • sceneshow

References

  • “scene” in The Bokmål Dictionary.

Norwegian Nynorsk

Alternative forms

  • sene

Etymology

From Ancient Greek σκηνή (skēnḗ, scene, stage), via Latin scaena

Noun

scene m (definite singular scenen, indefinite plural scenar, definite plural scenane)
scene f (definite singular scena, indefinite plural scener, definite plural scenene)

  1. a stage (in a theatre)
  2. a scene (in a film or play)

Derived terms

  • sceneshow

References

  • “scene” in The Nynorsk Dictionary.

Old English

Etymology

From Proto-West Germanic *skaunī, from Proto-Germanic *skauniz.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈʃeː.ne/

Adjective

sċēne

  1. Alternative form of sċīene

Declension


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