fix vs limit what difference

what is difference between fix and limit

English

Etymology

From Middle English fixen, borrowed from Old French *fixer (attested only as ficher, fichier; > English fitch), from fixe (fastened; fixed), from Latin fīxus (immovable; steady; stable; fixed), from fīgere (to drive in; stick; fasten), from Proto-Indo-European *dʰeygʷ- (to jab; stick; set). Related to dig.

Pronunciation

  • (UK, US) IPA(key): /ˈfɪks/
  • Rhymes: -ɪks

Verb

fix (third-person singular simple present fixes, present participle fixing, simple past and past participle fixt or fixed)

  1. (transitive, obsolete) To pierce; now generally replaced by transfix.
    1. (transitive, by extension) (Of a piercing look) to direct at someone.
  2. (transitive) To attach; to affix; to hold in place or at a particular time.
    1. (transitive, figuratively, usually in the passive) To focus or determine (oneself, on a concept); to fixate.
  3. (transitive) To mend, to repair.
  4. (transitive, informal) To prepare (food or drink).
  5. (transitive) To make (a contest, vote, or gamble) unfair; to privilege one contestant or a particular group of contestants, usually before the contest begins; to arrange immunity for defendants by tampering with the justice system via bribery or extortion.
  6. (transitive, US, informal) To surgically render an animal, especially a pet, infertile.
  7. (transitive, mathematics, sematics) To map a (point or subset) to itself.
  8. (transitive, informal) To take revenge on, to best; to serve justice on an assumed miscreant.
  9. (transitive) To render (a photographic impression) permanent by treating with such applications as will make it insensitive to the action of light.
  10. (transitive, chemistry, biology) To convert into a stable or available form.
    • 1878, William de Wiveleslie Abney, A treatise on photography
      it is well to fix with sodium hyposulphite , and to wash as usual
  11. (intransitive) To become fixed; to settle or remain permanently; to cease from wandering; to rest.
    • 1665, Edmund Waller, “Upon Her Maiesties New Buildings at Somerset-House”:
      Accuſing ſome malignant Star,
      Not Britain, for that fateful War,
      Your kindneſs baniſhes your fear,
      Reſolv’d to fix for ever here.
    • 1801, Robert Southey, Thalaba the Destroyer:
      A cheerless place! the solitary Bee,
      Whose buzzing was the only sound of life,
      Flew there on restless wing,
      Seeking in vain one blossom, where to fix.
  12. (intransitive) To become firm, so as to resist volatilization; to cease to flow or be fluid; to congeal; to become hard and malleable, as a metallic substance.
    • quicksilver will ‘fix, so asto endure the hammer

Alternative forms

  • fixe (archaic)

Synonyms

  • (pierce): impale, run through, stick
  • (hold in place): join, put together, unite; see also Thesaurus:join
  • (mend; repair): patch, put to rights, rectify; see also Thesaurus:repair
  • (make a contest unfair): doctor, rig
  • (render infertile): neuter, spay, desex, castrate
  • (settle or remain permanently): establish, settle down

Antonyms

  • (to hold in place): move, change

Derived terms

  • affix, affixative, fixed
  • fixings, fixity, fixety
  • fix someone’s wagon, fix someone up with

Descendants

  • Dutch: fixen, fiksen

Translations

Noun

fix (plural fixes)

  1. A repair or corrective action.
    Hyponyms: bugfix, technofix
  2. A difficult situation; a quandary or dilemma; a predicament.
    Synonyms: see Thesaurus:difficult situation
  3. (informal) A single dose of an addictive drug administered to a drug user.
  4. A prearrangement of the outcome of a supposedly competitive process, such as a sporting event, a game, an election, a trial, or a bid.
  5. A determination of location.
  6. (US) fettlings (mixture used to line a furnace)

Descendants

  • French: fixe, fix

Translations

References

Further reading

  • fix on Wikipedia.Wikipedia

Bouyei

Etymology

From Proto-Tai *wɤjᴬ (fire). Cognate with Thai ไฟ (fai), Northern Thai ᨼᩱ (fai), Lao ໄຟ (fai), ᦺᦝ (fay), Tai Dam ꪼꪡ, Shan ၽႆး (pháy) or ၾႆး (fáy), Tai Nüa ᥜᥭᥰ (fäy), Zhuang feiz, Saek วี๊.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /fi˧˩/

Noun

fix

  1. fire

Catalan

Etymology

Borrowed from Latin fixus.

Pronunciation

  • (Balearic, Central, Valencian) IPA(key): /ˈfiks/
  • Rhymes: -iks

Adjective

fix (feminine fixa, masculine plural fixos, feminine plural fixes)

  1. fixed, not changing
  2. stationary

Derived terms

  • fixar
  • telefonia fixa

Further reading

  • “fix” in Diccionari de la llengua catalana, segona edició, Institut d’Estudis Catalans.

Czech

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ˈfɪks]
  • Rhymes: -ɪks

Noun

fix m

  1. felt-tip pen, marker

Synonyms

  • popisovač

Dutch

Pronunciation

Verb

fix

  1. first-person singular present indicative of fixen
  2. imperative of fixen

French

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /fiks/
  • Homophone: fixe

Noun

fix m (plural fix)

  1. Alternative spelling of fixe

German

Etymology

Latin fīxus

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [fɪks]
  • Homophone: Ficks

Adjective

fix (comparative fixer, superlative am fixesten)

  1. fixed (costs, salary)
    Synonym: fest
  2. quick
    Synonym: schnell
  3. smart
    Synonym: aufgeweckt

Declension

Descendants

  • Hungarian: fix

See also

  • fix und fertig

Hungarian

Etymology

From German fix, from French fixe, from Latin figere, fixus.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ˈfiks]
  • Rhymes: -iks

Adjective

fix (not comparable)

  1. fixed, steady
    Synonyms: rögzített, megszabott
  2. immovable
    Synonym: szilárd
  3. sure, certain
    Synonyms: biztos, bizonyos

Declension

Derived terms

(Compound words):

  • fixpont

(Expressions):

  • fix objektív

Noun

fix

  1. a steady salary

Declension

References


Old French

Alternative forms

  • fils, fis, fiz

Noun

fix m

  1. inflection of fil:
    1. oblique plural
    2. nominative singular

Romanian

Etymology

From French fixe, from Latin fixus.

Adjective

fix m or n (feminine singular fixă, masculine plural ficși, feminine and neuter plural fixe)

  1. fixed

Declension


Swedish

Etymology

  • Homophone: ficks

Adjective

fix

  1. fixed, inflexible, rigid
    en fix idé

    a fixed idea

Declension

Related terms

  • fixstjärna

Noun

fix c

  1. a fix, a dose of an addictive drug

Declension


English

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈlɪmɪt/
  • (India) IPA(key): /ˈlɪmɪt/, /ˈlɪmt/
  • Rhymes: -ɪmɪt

Etymology 1

From Middle English limit, from Old French limit, from Latin līmes (a cross-path or balk between fields, hence a boundary, boundary line or wall, any path or road, border, limit).

Noun

limit (plural limits)

  1. A restriction; a bound beyond which one may not go.
    There are several existing limits to executive power.
    Two drinks is my limit tonight.
    • 1839, Charles Dickens, Nicholas Nickleby, chapter 21:
      It is the conductor which communicates to the inhabitants of regions beyond its limit []
    • 1922, James Joyce, Ulysses, episode 17:
      Ever he would wander, selfcompelled, to the extreme limit of his cometary orbit, beyond the fixed stars and variable suns and telescopic planets, astronomical waifs and strays, to the extreme boundary of space []
    • 2012 March 6, Dan McCrum, Nicole Bullock and Guy Chazan, Financial Times, “Utility buyout loses power in shale gas revolution”:
      At the time, there seemed to be no limit to the size of ever-larger private equity deals, with banks falling over each other to arrange financing on generous terms and to invest money from their own private equity arms.
  2. (mathematics) A value to which a sequence converges. Equivalently, the common value of the upper limit and the lower limit of a sequence: if the upper and lower limits are different, then the sequence has no limit (i.e., does not converge).
    The sequence of reciprocals has zero as its limit.
  3. (mathematics) Any of several abstractions of this concept of limit.
    Category theory defines a very general concept of limit.
  4. (category theory) The cone of a diagram through which any other cone of that same diagram can factor uniquely.
    Synonyms: inverse limit, projective limit
    Hyponyms: terminal object, categorical product, pullback, equalizer, identity morphism
  5. (poker) Fixed limit.
  6. The final, utmost, or furthest point; the border or edge.
    the limit of a walk, of a town, or of a country
  7. (obsolete) The space or thing defined by limits.
  8. (obsolete) That which terminates a period of time; hence, the period itself; the full time or extent.
  9. (obsolete) A restriction; a check or curb; a hindrance.
  10. (logic, metaphysics) A determining feature; a distinguishing characteristic.
  11. (cycling) The first group of riders to depart in a handicap race.
  12. (colloquial, as “the limit”) A person who is exasperating, intolerable, astounding, etc.
Synonyms
  • (restriction): bound, boundary, limitation, restriction, threshold
Derived terms
Descendants
  • German: Limit
Translations

Adjective

limit (not comparable)

  1. (poker) Being a fixed limit game.

See also

  • bound
  • function

Etymology 2

From Middle English limiten, from Old French limiter, from Latin līmitō (to bound, limit, fix, determine), from līmes; see noun.

Verb

limit (third-person singular simple present limits, present participle limiting, simple past and past participle limited)

  1. (transitive) To restrict; not to allow to go beyond a certain bound, to set boundaries.
    • [The Chinese government] has jailed environmental activists and is planning to limit the power of judicial oversight by handing a state-approved body a monopoly over bringing environmental lawsuits.
  2. (mathematics, intransitive) To have a limit in a particular set.
  3. (obsolete) To beg, or to exercise functions, within a certain limited region.
Synonyms
  • (restrict): See Thesaurus:hinder
Translations

Further reading

  • limit in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.
  • limit in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.
  • limit at OneLook Dictionary Search

Anagrams

  • milit.

Czech

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ˈlɪmɪt]

Noun

limit m

  1. limit

Related terms

  • limita
  • limitní
  • limitovat

Further reading

  • limit in Příruční slovník jazyka českého, 1935–1957
  • limit in Slovník spisovného jazyka českého, 1960–1971, 1989

Hungarian

Etymology

From English limit.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ˈlimit]
  • Hyphenation: li‧mit
  • Rhymes: -it

Noun

limit (plural limitek)

  1. limit (the final, utmost, or furthest point)

Declension

References


Polish

Etymology

From French limite, from Old French limit, from Latin līmes.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈlʲi.mʲit/

Noun

limit m inan

  1. limit (restriction; bound beyond which one may not go)

Declension

Derived terms

  • (verb) limitować
  • (adjective) limitowy

Further reading

  • limit in Wielki słownik języka polskiego, Instytut Języka Polskiego PAN
  • limit in Polish dictionaries at PWN

Serbo-Croatian

Etymology

From German Limit.

Noun

lìmit m (Cyrillic spelling лѝмит)

  1. boundary
  2. boundary that cannot be surpassed

Declension


Tagalog

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈli.mit/

Noun

limit

  1. frequency
  2. closeness; compactness; density

Synonyms

  • kalimitan

Derived terms

  • malimit

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