fix vs mess what difference

what is difference between fix and mess

English

Etymology

From Middle English fixen, borrowed from Old French *fixer (attested only as ficher, fichier; > English fitch), from fixe (fastened; fixed), from Latin fīxus (immovable; steady; stable; fixed), from fīgere (to drive in; stick; fasten), from Proto-Indo-European *dʰeygʷ- (to jab; stick; set). Related to dig.

Pronunciation

  • (UK, US) IPA(key): /ˈfɪks/
  • Rhymes: -ɪks

Verb

fix (third-person singular simple present fixes, present participle fixing, simple past and past participle fixt or fixed)

  1. (transitive, obsolete) To pierce; now generally replaced by transfix.
    1. (transitive, by extension) (Of a piercing look) to direct at someone.
  2. (transitive) To attach; to affix; to hold in place or at a particular time.
    1. (transitive, figuratively, usually in the passive) To focus or determine (oneself, on a concept); to fixate.
  3. (transitive) To mend, to repair.
  4. (transitive, informal) To prepare (food or drink).
  5. (transitive) To make (a contest, vote, or gamble) unfair; to privilege one contestant or a particular group of contestants, usually before the contest begins; to arrange immunity for defendants by tampering with the justice system via bribery or extortion.
  6. (transitive, US, informal) To surgically render an animal, especially a pet, infertile.
  7. (transitive, mathematics, sematics) To map a (point or subset) to itself.
  8. (transitive, informal) To take revenge on, to best; to serve justice on an assumed miscreant.
  9. (transitive) To render (a photographic impression) permanent by treating with such applications as will make it insensitive to the action of light.
  10. (transitive, chemistry, biology) To convert into a stable or available form.
    • 1878, William de Wiveleslie Abney, A treatise on photography
      it is well to fix with sodium hyposulphite , and to wash as usual
  11. (intransitive) To become fixed; to settle or remain permanently; to cease from wandering; to rest.
    • 1665, Edmund Waller, “Upon Her Maiesties New Buildings at Somerset-House”:
      Accuſing ſome malignant Star,
      Not Britain, for that fateful War,
      Your kindneſs baniſhes your fear,
      Reſolv’d to fix for ever here.
    • 1801, Robert Southey, Thalaba the Destroyer:
      A cheerless place! the solitary Bee,
      Whose buzzing was the only sound of life,
      Flew there on restless wing,
      Seeking in vain one blossom, where to fix.
  12. (intransitive) To become firm, so as to resist volatilization; to cease to flow or be fluid; to congeal; to become hard and malleable, as a metallic substance.
    • quicksilver will ‘fix, so asto endure the hammer

Alternative forms

  • fixe (archaic)

Synonyms

  • (pierce): impale, run through, stick
  • (hold in place): join, put together, unite; see also Thesaurus:join
  • (mend; repair): patch, put to rights, rectify; see also Thesaurus:repair
  • (make a contest unfair): doctor, rig
  • (render infertile): neuter, spay, desex, castrate
  • (settle or remain permanently): establish, settle down

Antonyms

  • (to hold in place): move, change

Derived terms

  • affix, affixative, fixed
  • fixings, fixity, fixety
  • fix someone’s wagon, fix someone up with

Descendants

  • Dutch: fixen, fiksen

Translations

Noun

fix (plural fixes)

  1. A repair or corrective action.
    Hyponyms: bugfix, technofix
  2. A difficult situation; a quandary or dilemma; a predicament.
    Synonyms: see Thesaurus:difficult situation
  3. (informal) A single dose of an addictive drug administered to a drug user.
  4. A prearrangement of the outcome of a supposedly competitive process, such as a sporting event, a game, an election, a trial, or a bid.
  5. A determination of location.
  6. (US) fettlings (mixture used to line a furnace)

Descendants

  • French: fixe, fix

Translations

References

Further reading

  • fix on Wikipedia.Wikipedia

Bouyei

Etymology

From Proto-Tai *wɤjᴬ (fire). Cognate with Thai ไฟ (fai), Northern Thai ᨼᩱ (fai), Lao ໄຟ (fai), ᦺᦝ (fay), Tai Dam ꪼꪡ, Shan ၽႆး (pháy) or ၾႆး (fáy), Tai Nüa ᥜᥭᥰ (fäy), Zhuang feiz, Saek วี๊.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /fi˧˩/

Noun

fix

  1. fire

Catalan

Etymology

Borrowed from Latin fixus.

Pronunciation

  • (Balearic, Central, Valencian) IPA(key): /ˈfiks/
  • Rhymes: -iks

Adjective

fix (feminine fixa, masculine plural fixos, feminine plural fixes)

  1. fixed, not changing
  2. stationary

Derived terms

  • fixar
  • telefonia fixa

Further reading

  • “fix” in Diccionari de la llengua catalana, segona edició, Institut d’Estudis Catalans.

Czech

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ˈfɪks]
  • Rhymes: -ɪks

Noun

fix m

  1. felt-tip pen, marker

Synonyms

  • popisovač

Dutch

Pronunciation

Verb

fix

  1. first-person singular present indicative of fixen
  2. imperative of fixen

French

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /fiks/
  • Homophone: fixe

Noun

fix m (plural fix)

  1. Alternative spelling of fixe

German

Etymology

Latin fīxus

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [fɪks]
  • Homophone: Ficks

Adjective

fix (comparative fixer, superlative am fixesten)

  1. fixed (costs, salary)
    Synonym: fest
  2. quick
    Synonym: schnell
  3. smart
    Synonym: aufgeweckt

Declension

Descendants

  • Hungarian: fix

See also

  • fix und fertig

Hungarian

Etymology

From German fix, from French fixe, from Latin figere, fixus.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ˈfiks]
  • Rhymes: -iks

Adjective

fix (not comparable)

  1. fixed, steady
    Synonyms: rögzített, megszabott
  2. immovable
    Synonym: szilárd
  3. sure, certain
    Synonyms: biztos, bizonyos

Declension

Derived terms

(Compound words):

  • fixpont

(Expressions):

  • fix objektív

Noun

fix

  1. a steady salary

Declension

References


Old French

Alternative forms

  • fils, fis, fiz

Noun

fix m

  1. inflection of fil:
    1. oblique plural
    2. nominative singular

Romanian

Etymology

From French fixe, from Latin fixus.

Adjective

fix m or n (feminine singular fixă, masculine plural ficși, feminine and neuter plural fixe)

  1. fixed

Declension


Swedish

Etymology

  • Homophone: ficks

Adjective

fix

  1. fixed, inflexible, rigid
    en fix idé

    a fixed idea

Declension

Related terms

  • fixstjärna

Noun

fix c

  1. a fix, a dose of an addictive drug

Declension


English

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /mɛs/
  • Rhymes: -ɛs

Etymology 1

Perhaps a corruption of Middle English mesh (mash), compare muss, or derived from Etymology 2 “mixed foods, as for animals”.

Noun

mess (countable and uncountable, plural messes)

  1. A disagreeable mixture or confusion of things; hence, a situation resulting from blundering or from misunderstanding.
    Synonyms: disorder; see also Thesaurus:disorder
  2. (colloquial) A large quantity or number.
  3. (euphemistic) Excrement.
  4. (figuratively) A person in a state of (especially emotional) turmoil or disarray; an emotional wreck.
Quotations
  • For quotations using this term, see Citations:mess.
Translations

Verb

mess (third-person singular simple present messes, present participle messing, simple past and past participle messed)

  1. (transitive, often used with “up”) To make untidy or dirty.
    1. To make soiled by defecating.
  2. (transitive, often used with “up”) To throw into disorder or to ruin.
  3. (intransitive) To interfere.
  4. (used with “with”) To screw around with, to bother, to be annoying to.

Translations

Derived terms

Etymology 2

From Middle English mes, partly from Old English mēse, mēose (table); and partly from Old French mes, Late Latin missum, from mittō (to put, place (e.g. on the table)). See mission, and compare Mass (religious service).

Noun

mess (plural messes)

  1. (obsolete) Mass; a church service.
  2. (archaic) A quantity of food set on a table at one time; provision of food for a person or party for one meal; also, the food given to an animal at one time.
    • c. 1555, Hugh Latimer, letter to one in prison for the profession of the Gospel
      1. a mess of pottage
  3. (collective) A number of persons who eat together, and for whom food is prepared in common, especially military personnel who eat at the same table.
  4. A building or room in which mess is eaten.
  5. A set of four (from the old practice of dividing companies into sets of four at dinner).
  6. (US) The milk given by a cow at one milking.
  7. (collective) A group of iguanas.
    Synonym: slaughter
Derived terms
Translations
Further reading
  • Mess (military) on Wikipedia.Wikipedia

Verb

mess (third-person singular simple present messes, present participle messing, simple past and past participle messed)

  1. (intransitive) To take meals with a mess.
  2. (intransitive) To belong to a mess.
  3. (intransitive) To eat (with others).
    • 1836, George Simpson & al., HBC Standing Rules and Regulations, §18:
      Resolved 18. That no Guide or Interpreter whether at the Factory Depot or Inland be permitted to mess with Commissioned Gentlemen or Clerks in charge of Posts; but while at the Depot they will be allowed per Week 4 days ordinary rations…
  4. (transitive) To supply with a mess.

Further reading

  • Mess (disambiguation) on Wikipedia.Wikipedia

References

  • mess in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.

Anagrams

  • MSEs, MSes, Mses, Mses., SEMs, SMEs, sems

Hungarian

Alternative forms

  • messél, metssz, metsszél

Etymology

metsz +‎ -j (personal suffix)

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ˈmɛʃː]
  • Hyphenation: mess
  • Rhymes: -ɛʃː

Verb

mess

  1. second-person singular subjunctive present indefinite of metsz

Maltese

Etymology

From Arabic مَسَّ(massa).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /mɛs/

Verb

mess (imperfect jmiss, past participle mimsus)

  1. to touch
  2. (figuratively) to touch, to affect

Conjugation


Manx

Etymology

From Old Irish mes. Cognate with Irish meas (fruit, mast)

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /meːs/

Noun

mess m (genitive singular mess, plural messyn)

  1. (botany) fruit

Derived terms

  • messghart

Mutation


Norwegian Bokmål

Verb

mess

  1. imperative of messe

Old Irish

Alternative forms

  • mes

Etymology

From Proto-Celtic *messus, from Proto-Indo-European *med-.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [mʲes]

Noun

mess m (genitive messa, nominative plural mesai)

  1. verbal noun of midithir
  2. judgment
    • c. 800–825, Diarmait, Milan Glosses on the Psalms, published in Thesaurus Palaeohibernicus (reprinted 1987, Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies), edited and with translations by Whitley Stokes and John Strachan, vol. I, pp. 7–483, Ml. 55d11

Declension

Descendants

  • Irish: meas

Mutation

Further reading

  • Gregory Toner, Maire Ní Mhaonaigh, Sharon Arbuthnot, Dagmar Wodtko, Maire-Luise Theuerkauf, editors (2019), “1 mes(s)”, in eDIL: Electronic Dictionary of the Irish Language

Swedish

Etymology

Clipping of sms.

Noun

mess n

  1. (colloquial) text message
    Synonym: sms

Declension

Derived terms

  • messa

References

  • mess in Svenska Akademiens ordlista (SAOL)
  • mess in Svensk ordbok (SO)

Vilamovian

Noun

mess n

  1. brass

Related terms

  • messera

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