fixation vs obsession what difference

what is difference between fixation and obsession

English

Etymology

From Old French fixation.

Pronunciation

  • (US) IPA(key): /fɪksˈeɪʃən/
  • Rhymes: -eɪʃən

Noun

fixation (countable and uncountable, plural fixations)

  1. The act of fixing.
  2. The state of being fixed or fixated.
  3. The act of uniting chemically with a solid substance or in a solid form; reduction to a non-volatile condition; — said of volatile elements.
  4. The act or process of ceasing to be fluid and becoming firm.
  5. In metals, a state of resistance to evaporation or volatilization by heat.
  6. A state of mind involving obsession with a particular person, idea, or thing.
  7. (law) Recording a creative work in a medium of expression for more than a transitory duration, thereby satisfying the “fixation” requirement for the purposes of copyright law.
    In order to obtain copyright on a recording in the United States, the recording must have been reduced to fixation on or after February 15, 1972.
  8. (genetics) The change in a gene pool from a situation where there exists at least two variants of a particular gene (allele) to a situation where only one of the alleles remains.

Synonyms

  • (state of being fixed): fixedness

Antonyms

  • (act of fixing): movement, change

Translations

References

Fixation (population genetics) on Wikipedia.Wikipedia


French

Etymology

fixer +‎ -ation

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /fik.sa.sjɔ̃/

Noun

fixation f (plural fixations)

  1. fixation
    Tu ferais bien de vérifier les fixations avant de partir.
  2. (psychology, informal) fixation, obsession
    Synonyms: fixette, obsession

Further reading

  • “fixation” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).


English

Etymology

From Latin obsessio (a besieging), from obsidere (to besiege); see obsess.

Pronunciation

  • (UK, US) IPA(key): /əbˈsɛʃən/
  • Rhymes: -ɛʃən

Noun

obsession (countable and uncountable, plural obsessions)

  1. A compulsive or irrational preoccupation.
  2. An unhealthy fixation.
  3. Influence or control by evil spirits without possession.
    • 1973, Jessie Penn-Lewis, Evan Roberts, War on the Saints, →ISBN.
      if an evil spirit counterfeits the presence of God, and comes upon the man as an influence only, it may be described as obsession; but when a footing is gained in him, it is “possession,” because the obsessing spirits have gained access, and possess the ground they hold, up to the extent of the ground given.
    • 1999, Mary E. McDonough, God’s Plan of Redemption, page 85, →ISBN.
      They should see that a perception of their identification with the Victor of Calvary is absolutely necessary if they are to constantly and victoriously resist the obsession of evil spirits.
    • 2007, James E. Padgett, The Teachings of Jesus, page 100, →ISBN.
      It is true, that by the workings of the law of attraction, and the susceptibility of mortals to the influence of spirit powers, mortals may become obsessed by the spirits of evil—that is evil spirits of men who once lived on earth—and this obsession may become so complete and powerful that the living mortal may lose all power to resist this influence of the evil spirits…

Related terms

  • obsess
  • obsessed
  • obsessional
  • obsessive, obsessively

Translations

Further reading

  • obsession in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.
  • obsession in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.

Anagrams

  • bosonises

French

Etymology

From Latin obsessio (a besieging), from obsidere (to besiege); see obsess.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɔp.sɛ.sjɔ̃/

Noun

obsession f (plural obsessions)

  1. obsession

Related terms

  • obsédant
  • obsédé
  • obséder
  • obsessif

Further reading

  • “obsession” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

Anagrams

  • ébossions, obéissons

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