fizzle vs flop what difference

what is difference between fizzle and flop

English

Etymology

Attested in English since 1525-35. From earlier fysel (to fart). Related to fīsa (to fart). Compare with Swedish fisa (to fart (silently)). See also feist.

Pronunciation

  • (UK, US) IPA(key): /ˈfɪzəl/
  • Rhymes: -ɪzəl

Verb

fizzle (third-person singular simple present fizzles, present participle fizzling, simple past and past participle fizzled)

  1. To sputter or hiss.
    The soda fizzled for several minutes after it was poured.
    • 1616, Ben Jonson, The Devil Is an Ass
      It is the easest thing, sir, to be done, / As plain as fizzling.
  2. (figuratively) To decay or die off to nothing; to burn out; to end less successfully than previously hoped.
    The entire project fizzled after the founder quit.
  3. (military, of a nuclear weapon) To fail to generate the expected yield when exploded during testing.

Derived terms

  • fizzler

Translations

Noun

fizzle (plural fizzles)

  1. A spluttering or hissing sound.
  2. (military) Failure of an exploding nuclear bomb to meet its expected yield during testing.
  3. An abortive effort; a flop or dud.
  4. A state of agitation or worry.

Usage notes

In the context of nuclear testing, a fizzle (an explosion with inadequate yield) is distinguished from a dud (a failure to explode at all).

Translations

Related terms

  • fizz
  • fizzy


English

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /flɒp/
  • (General American) IPA(key): /flɑp/
  • Rhymes: -ɒp

Etymology 1

Recorded since 1602, probably a variant of flap with a duller, heavier sound

Verb

flop (third-person singular simple present flops, present participle flopping, simple past and past participle flopped)

  1. (intransitive) To fall heavily due to lack of energy.
    • 1846, Charles Dickens, Pictures from Italy
      instantly flopping back again at sight of her , and banging his little door violently
  2. (transitive) To cause to drop heavily.
  3. (intransitive, informal) To fail completely; not to be successful at all (of a movie, play, book, song etc.).
  4. (sports, intransitive) To pretend to be fouled in sports, such as basketball, hockey (the same as to dive in soccer)
  5. (intransitive) To strike about with something broad and flat, as a fish with its tail, or a bird with its wings; to rise and fall; to flap.
  6. (poker, transitive) To have (a hand) using the community cards dealt on the flop.
  7. (intransitive, slang) To stay, sleep or live in a place.
    • 1969, Howard E. Freeman, Norman R. Kurtz, America’s Troubles: A Casebook on Social Conflict, Prentice-Hall, Page 414,
      [] not just the old material goal of “three hots and a place to flop,” []
    • 1973, Alan Watts, Cloud-Hidden, Whereabouts Unknown: A Mountain Journal, Pantheon Books, page 135,
      They have opened up crypts and basements as immense pads where vagrant and impoverished hippies can flop for the night.
  8. (transitive) To flip; to reverse (an image).
    • 1968, Advertising Techniques (volumes 4-5, page 28)
      The possibilities of this type of shot are almost limitless. By quartering the screen and duplicating and flopping the picture, a kaleidoscopic effect is achieved.
    • 1986, Functional Photography (volumes 21-23, page 58)
      [] in order to flop the image left-to-right, or all printing will appear reversed.
Derived terms
Translations

Noun

flop (plural flops)

  1. An incident of a certain type of fall; a plopping down.
  2. A complete failure, especially in the entertainment industry.
    Synonyms: dud, fiasco, turkey, box office bomb
  3. (poker) The first three cards turned face-up by the dealer in a community card poker game.
    • 1996: John Patrick, John Patrick’s Casino Poker: Professional Gambler’s Guide to Winning
      The flop didn’t help you but probably did help the other hands.
    • 2003: Lou Krieger, Internet Poker: How to Play and Beat Online Poker Games
      Here are six tips to help you play successfully on the flop (the first three communal cards).
    • 2005: Henry Stephenson, Real Poker Night: Taking Your Home Game to a New Level
      The strength of your hand now has nothing to do with how strong it may have been before the flop.
  4. A ponded package of dung, as in a cow-flop.
    • 1960, Winston Graham, Ross Poldark: A Novel of Cornwall, 1783-1787, Bodley Head, Page 302,
      “Maybe as you think,” he said, “because as I’ve the misfortune of an accidental slip on a cow-flop therefore I has the inability of an unborn babe, …
    • 2000, Dean King, A Sea of Words: A Lexicon and Companion for Patrick O’Brian’s Seafaring Tales, Henry Holt & Co., Page 162,
      … cowpat or cow-flop, Cow dung, often used dry as heating fuel.
    • 2003, John W. Billheimer, Drybone Hollow, St. Martin’s Press, Page 215,
      “Cow flop in a neat package is still cow flop. What did Cable stand to gain from the flood?”
    • 2018 Brent Butt as Brent Herbert Leroy, “Sasquatch Your Language”, Corner Gas Animated
      Wherever legitimate tracks are found there’s always some fresh scat, y’know, poo, flop, dumplings.
  5. (slang) A flophouse.
    • 2013, Gardner Dozois, Jack Dann, Dangerous Games
      He was kind of worn but the tooth said he’d never lost a fight or slept in a flop.
Derived terms
Translations

Adverb

flop (not comparable)

  1. Right, squarely, flat-out.
  2. With a flopping sound.
See also
  • aflop

Related terms

  • flip-flop

Etymology 2

A variant capitalization of FLOP, a syllabic acronym of floating-point operations.

Noun

flop (plural flops)

  1. (computing) One floating-point operation per second, a unit of measure of processor speed.
    • 1992 March 2, Richard Preston, The New Yorker, “The Mountains of Pi”:
      The gigaflop supercomputers of today are almost useless. What is needed is a teraflop machine. That’s a machine that can run at a trillion flops, a trillion floating-point operations per second, or roughly a thousand times as fast as Cray Y-MP8.
  2. (computing) Abbreviation of floating-point operation.
    • 1993 August 17, New York Times, C8:
      The Correlator can perform 750 billion ‘flops’, or simple calculations, per second.
Alternative forms
  • (unit of processing speed): FLOPS
  • (floating-point operation): FLOP
Derived terms

References

  • “FLOP, n2.”, in OED Online ⁠, Oxford, Oxfordshire: Oxford University Press, December 2012.

Dutch

Etymology

Borrowed from English flop. See also flap.

Pronunciation

  • Rhymes: -ɔp

Noun

flop m (plural floppen or flops, diminutive flopje n)

  1. A failure, something that went wrong
  2. short for floppydisk

Synonyms

  • fiasco (1)
  • mislukking (1)
  • sof (1)
  • diskette (2)

Verb

flop

  1. first-person singular present indicative of floppen
  2. imperative of floppen

Anagrams

  • plof

Indonesian

Etymology 1

From Dutch flop

Noun

flop

  1. failure, something that went wrong

Etymology 2

From English flop

Noun

flop

  1. (sports) flop, to strike about with something broad and flat, to rise and fall, to flap.

Further reading

  • “flop” in Kamus Besar Bahasa Indonesia (KBBI) Daring, Jakarta: Badan Pengembangan dan Pembinaan Bahasa, Kementerian Pendidikan dan Kebudayaan Republik Indonesia, 2016.

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